(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



1994 




Annual Report 



Town of Andover 
Massachusetts 



Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
ELM SQUARE 
ANDOVER, MA 01810 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 
1994 ANNUAL REPORT 



PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, SECTION 49 

OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTOGRAPH: 

Main Street - 1957 - by Dorothy Piercy 

Collection of the Andover Historical Society 
on Long-term Loan to the Andover Town Offices 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1994ando 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 

Andover, MA 01810 

(508) 470-3800 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 

The year 1994 was one of challenges and accomplishments. The 

planning efforts of previous years came together in 1994 to form 

the bases for events that made us proud to be Andoverites. The 
following deserve special attention: 

In May, the voters overwhelmingly approved two debt exemptions 
for the Andover Schools which totalled $40. 5M. The sum of 
$38. 5M was for additions and renovations to the Andover High 
School, South Elementary School and Sanborn Elementary School. 
The sum of $2.0M was for a system-wide computer technology 
program. During the summer, site work including driveways, 
parking lots and soccer fields was completed at both the South 
and Sanborn Elementary Schools. By years end, contracts were 
awarded to Stone-Congress for the Andover High School and to 
R. W. Grainger for the South Elementary School. The contract 
for Sanborn Elementary School will be bid in the Spring of 
1995. Also, the Town borrowed $9.0M for the first phase of 
the school construction project at an interest rate of 5.6%. 
Moody's Investors Service rated the Town Aa. 

In June, the Board of Selectmen, along with 400 other runners 
and walkers, participated in a town-wide celebration of 
community spirit and enthusiasm known as the first Annual 24 
Hour Relay Challenge. The weekend event was planned and 
coordinated by Andover High School's Community Service 
Committee. This unique happening brought all segments of the 
community together to run and/or walk in a relay event for 
twenty-four hours to raise funds to support inter-generational 
programs at the High School. 

The FY-1995 Town Budget was awarded the Government Finance 
Officers Association annual "Distinguished Budget 
Presentation" award. Andover won this award on its first 
application in the program. The award reflects the commitment 
of the governing body and staff to meeting the highest 
principles of governmental budgeting. In order to receive the 
budget award, the Town had to satisfy nationally recognized 
guidelines for effective budget presentation. These 
guidelines are designed to assess how well the Town's budget 
serves as a policy document, a financial plan, an operations 
guide and a communications device. Budget documents must be 
rated "proficient" in all four categories to receive the 
award . 



The Town's commitment to Total Quality continued with a second 
training grant from the Executive Office of Communities and 
Development (EOCD) for the Towns of Andover, Arlington, Danvers and 
Bedford. In 1994, the Town had three successful Total Quality 
Teams : 

Licensing Team defined and improved the licensing/permitting 
of new food and alcohol serving facilities. 

TIMES (Take Ideas and Make Meaningful Solutions) Team 
established an internal communication process to provide 
employees with a suggestion program to create a better working 
environment . 

P.C. Focus Team analyzed the use of P.C. 's by Town 
Departments, provided a program for the selection and 
acquisition of hardware and software and provided training to 
support this program. 

Total Quality training continued with the emphasis on training 
teams on the basic concepts and tools of quality and training the 
trainers so that each of the four communities can be more self 
sufficient. 

As one can read, 1994 was a year of grand accomplishments. 
These events could not have taken place without the cooperation and 
teamwork of the Board of Selectmen, department heads, employees, 
members of boards/committees and citizens. The quality of life in 
Andover is a direct result of the countless hours of hard work and 
planning that these individuals and groups do on behalf of the 
community they serve. 

Please continue this quality of life by participating in the 
Annual Town Election on Monday, March 27, 1995 and the Annual Town 
Meeting on April 10, 11, 12, 1995. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



2 

OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (508) 470-3800 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Dear Citizens of Andover: 

This has been a busy year for the Town of Andover and your 
Board of Selectmen. 

After 40 years, Ford's Coffee Shop closed its doors and Tom 
and Stella Koravos were honored at the Annual Town Meeting in 
April . 

At that meeting, voters passed a $40. 5M debt override to 
provide additions to the Andover High School and South and Sanborn 
Elementary Schools. Part of the funds will be used to update and 
improve the system-wide technology program. The override was 
passed at a ballot election that took place after the meeting. All 
of the projects are in process at this time. 

A Task Force on Classification was established and they gave 
a report to the Board of Selectmen prior to their 1995 decision on 
tax rate classification which remained at the same differential 
between residential and commercial/ industrial. 

For the first time in many years, all of the Town's labor 
contracts were signed prior to the end of the fiscal year. 

Work still continues on the River Road project and work will 
begin to make the Gould Road/Rte. 125 intersection safer. There 
will also be a lane reduction on Route 28 in the Phillips Academy 
area. 

A major bylaw passed overwhelmingly at the Annual Town Meeting 
that eliminated smoking in all public buildings and restaurants in 
Andover . 

We also agreed to eliminate the sounding of train whistles and 
are awaiting a legislative act before it goes into effect. 

Town buildings for the youth and elderly are planned. Present 
plans are to expand the Senior Center at its present site and to 
build a youth center at Recreation Park. Both of these projects 
are planned to be financed through donations, gifts and not Town 
funds . 

Next year we begin celebration of Andover' s 350th anniversary 
and we hope all of its residents will participate in the many 
events planned by the 350th Anniversary Committee. 

Respectfully submitted for the 
Board of Selectmen, 




Gerald H. Silverman 
Chairman 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 

Andover, MA 01810 

(508) 470-3800 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Board of Selectmen » 

FROM: Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manager/^^^ 

SUBJ: 1994 Accomplishments/Highlights W* JU 

DATE: March 8, 1995 

This memo is presented to show the 1994 highlights and 
accomplishments of the departments, boards and committees of the 
Town of Andover. As we enter 1995 and determine what goals we want 
to set for the year, it is helpful to look back and reflect on what 
was accomplished during the past calendar year. 

In 1994, the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager's Offices 
witnessed the following highlights: 

Settled collective bargaining agreements with all employee 
groups for a three-year period (FY-93, FY-94 and FY-95) . The 
total wage package for all groups totalled 9% over the life of 
the contract. 

Ford's Coffee Shop, a gathering place for townspeople on Main 
Street for over 40 years, closed its doors on April 2nd. The 
Main Street mural from the coffee shop was given to the Town 
Offices on permanent loan from the Andover Historical Society. 

Voters approved a $40. 5M debt exemption in May, 1994 to fund 
additions and renovations to the South Elementary and Sanborn 
Elementary Schools and the Andover High School. Also included 
in the $40. 5M was $2.0M for system-wide computer technology 
improvements . 

Tax Classification Task Force was formed to provide the Board 
with citizen input in the annual real estate tax 
classification process. They issued a report in November. 

The Board of Selectmen voted to classify the tax rate with the 
resulting residential rate of $16.06 and the commercial, 
industrial and personal property rate of $24.19. 

The Board of Selectmen participated in the first Annual 24 
Hour Relay Challenge, a celebration of community spirit, in 
June at Andover High School along with approximately 400 other 
people. 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Two 

The Golden Knights Parachute Team participated in the Town's 
Memorial Day festivites. 

The Andover Village Improvement Society (A.V.I.S.) celebrated 
their 100th anniversary. An exhibit depicting their 
activities over the last one hundred years was displayed in 
the Town Offices second floor hallway during the summer 
months . 

Voters at the Special Town Meeting authorized the Town Manager 
and Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature to enact a 
special law relative to discontinuing the sounding of train 
whistles at railroad crossings in the Town that are otherwise 
protected by warning devices. The Town's petition was filed 
by the Legislature and will be heard in 1995. 

The Board of Selectmen witnessed the investiture of Barbara 
Landis Chase as the Fourteenth Head of School at Phillips 
Academy in September. 

As a result of the Commowealth ' s re-alignment of voting 
districts, Precinct 5 (West Andover) was moved from the 17th 
Essex District to the 18th Middlesex District with Lowell and 
Tewksbury and represented by State Senator Edward LeLacheur 
(D-Lowell) . 



FINANCE & BUDGET 

Issued bids for Andover High School and South Elementary 
School addition and renovation projects. 

Borrowed $9 million for the first phase of the School Building 
Program at an interest rate of 5.6%. 

Maintained Town's Aa rating from Moody's Investors Service. 

Awarded contract for computerized, in-house motor vehicle 
excise billing and accounts receivable system. 

Submitted the Town of Andover FY1995 Budget to Government 
Finance Officers Association annual "Distinguished Budget 
Presentation" awards program. In late January, 1995, GFOA 
informed the Town that its FY-1995 Budget won a "Distinguished 
Budget Presentation" award. 

Prepared public informational letter about Town services to 
new homeowners when a "certificate of lien" is issued for a 
residential real estate closing. 

Bid Town's three-year property, liability and motor vehicle 
insurance package. The $300,000 annual savings helped to 
provide additional funds for school operations for FY1995. 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Three 



The Patriotic Holiday Committee raised almost $15,000 in 
donations for the Elm Green Veterans Memorial project. An 
anonymous donor has agreed to donate the final $10,000 once 
the Committee has raised an additional $5,000 to complete the 
pro j ect . 

Finalized the real estate re-evaluation program begun by the 
Board of Assessors in 1993. 



ACCOUNTING & RETIREMENT 

Calculated and paid the retroactive compensation for over 300 
Town employees as all ten (10) labor agreements were signed 
with retroactive payments to July 1, 1992. The office spent 
considerable time over the last eight months calculating 
salary schedules for each agreement. Settlement required the 
calculation of approximately 45 sets of salary schedules and 
the recalculation of each employee's weekly earnings for the 
past 2h years. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Bill Fahey, Youth Services Coordinator, was hired in January 
through the School Department's Tobacco Cessation Grant. He 
has been working with the newly formed Andover Youth Council 
establishing a variety of programs including: personal growth 
groups, Outward Bound, Teen Corp and the Summer Connection 
Program. 

The Andover Youth Council and the Department of Community 
Services worked in conjunction with the Department of 
Municipal Maintenance, youth sport groups and neighbors on 
plans to upgrade Recreation Park including a community Youth 
Center and additional playing fields. 

Several new and exciting programs were offered this year - an 
after school foreign language program for elementary students 
and a summer Studio for the Arts enrichment program. 

Other town-wide projects included: Earth Day, Safety 
Saturday, Bike Rodeo, Fourth of July activities and the Our 
Town program. The Department of Community Services continues 
to offer a variety of children's after school and evening 
adult enrichment and recreational classes. 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Four 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Conducted a community-wide survey designed to provide 
information about how Andover residents use the library and 
how to increase future usage. This survey provided much of 
the data needed by the Library's Long Range Planning 
Committee . 

Completed the Library's Long Range Plan covering the period 
1994 - 1997. It includes an Action Plan of 8 goals with 22 
associated objectives and 60 activities. 

State reimbursement increased by 37% for regional activities 
at Memorial Hall Library which translates into increased 
reference staff and materials for library users and increased 
backup support in reference, inter-library loan, and delivery 
for the 37 towns and cities in northeastern Massachusetts. 

Reference Department added 10 "EBSCO" work stations which 
provide indexing and abstracting to 490 periodicals and full 
text for 125 periodicals. 

Children's Library special programs such as "Baby Talk", 
Summer Reading, Puppet Shows, "Readers of the Round Table" and 
Children's Book Week activities complemented the increased 
circulation of Children's materials. 

Youth Adult Librarian developed a summer volunteer program for 
teens and a summer reading program entitled "Reach Out and 
Read". A Young Adult Advisory Group has been formed. 

A new voice mail telephone system was added to provide direct 
access to departments and to improve service to patrons at the 
front desk of the Library. 

Shirley McGrath retired in April after serving the Town for 
15^5 years as Assistant Director of the Library. Beth Mazin, 
who worked at the Philadelphia Free Library for 13 years and 
at the Memorial Hall Library as a Reference Librarian since 
1987, was promoted to that position. Glenda Schaake was 
promoted to the position of Head of Reference in July after 
having worked in that department for the past 10 years. 

TOWN CLERK 

Office staff prepared for four elections, an Annual Town 
Meeting, a Special Town Meeting, a Special Election and an 
election recount during 1994. 

The new mail-in voter registration passed into law by the 
Legislature was implemented. 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Five 



Over 1,000 new voter registrations were processed between July 
1st and October 11th - the last day to register to vote for 
the State Election. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

A survey of the number of seniors who received Senior Center 
services and/or programs was done. It revealed that of the 
4,600 seniors in the community, 1,383 were involved in some 
way over the past three years, with a greater proportion 
participating over the past year due to new programs, 
volunteer efforts and a greater need for outreach services. 

Several new classes have been added this year: Creative 
Writing, Beginner's Water Color, Beginner's Oil Painting, Tai 
Chi, Yoga, Beginner's Line Dance and Woodcarving. In 
addition, many new lectures were added to the already existing 
schedule throughout the year and several thematic social 
celebrations were very successful. 

There was a marked increase in the number of services provided 
by the Outreach Department. The Coordinator's full-time 
status since July 1, 1994 has allowed us to provide more 
services to unduplicated seniors. 

The activity level at the Senior Center has increased 
impressively this past year due to the numbers participating 
in various classes and programs. Because of this demand, it 
became clear that an Activities Coordinator would be needed to 
coordinate and develop present and future programs. The 
Council received a State Formula Grant of $13,835 to fund the 
Activities Coordinator's position. Judith Kennedy was hired 
to fill this position. 

The implementation of a S.H.I.N.E. Counseling Program has 
provided many hours of client counseling on health insurance 
information which can be a confusing and frustrating subject 
for seniors. 

Meals-on-Wheels had a 30% increase due in large part to 
changes in hospital policies, whereby frail seniors are being 
returned to their homes earlier and not being well enough to 
prepare their meals. Presently, 45 meals are being delivered 
daily. 

Elderly Social Day Care Program continued to experience a 
sharp decline in participants. This is due to a variety of 
reasons including new criteria set up by the health care 
reimbursement system. The Council's goal is to continue to 
make strong efforts to increase the census in the Elderly Day 
Care Program. 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Six 

Development of plans for a new senior center project gained 
momentum in 1994. The Council on Aging spent the past year 
exploring sites through the RFP process and in discussions 
with the architect, Planning Division and Town officials. 
Presently, the Council will focus on the expansion and 
renovation to the existing building. The Council on Aging 
Board hopes to complete this project, with the support and 
direction of Town officials, over the next few years. 

Senior Tax Voucher Program was approved at the Special Town 
Meeting. Andover senior property owners may work in community 
service for 100 hours at $5.00 per hour for a maximum of a 
$500.00 rebate on their taxes. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Constructed 3,913 feet of storm drainage at a cost of $158,054 
on: Canterbury Street, Bailey Road, Rasmussen Circle, 
Tewksbury Street and Pleasant Street. 

Completed 6,100 feet of water main installation at a cost of 
$221,000 on: Brown Street, High Street and County Road. 

Rebuilt/Resurfaced 5.9 miles of roadways at a cost of $506,600 
on: Barbara Lane, Germano Way, Bailey Road, Boston Road, 
Chandler Circle, County Road, Gould Road, Marwood Drive, 
Pinecrest Road, Suncrest Road, Rattlesnake Hill Road, Shaw 
Drive, Chatham Road, Meadowbrook Drive, Sandy Brook Circle, 
Glenn Cove Road and Pleasant Street. 

Constructed 7,553 feet of underdrain installation at a cost of 
$106,775 on: Chatham Road, Meadowbrook Drive, Sandy Brook 
Circle, Shaw Drive, Barbara Lane, Germano Way, Marie Drive, 
Kathleen Drive and Arcadia Drive. 

Collected approximately 2,870 tons of recyclable newspapers, 
magazines, steel/tin cans and glass at a cost of $151,835. 
The compost site on Bald Hill accepted 1,260 tons of leaves 
and grass clippings. A model program of providing various 
drop off sites was continued for collecting used button 
batteries in an effort to economically remove harmful metals 
from the waste stream. 

Research completed demonstrating the relationship of Iodine 
Number and other capacity tests to determine the condition of 
the granular activated carbon for taste and odor control. 

Highway Division was challenged by the largest snow 
accumulation in the past ten years as over 90 inches of snow 
fell. The Division removed snow and ice, kept all roads clear 
and prevented hazardous driving and walking conditions. 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Seven 



Water Treatment Plant produced nearly two billion gallons of 
water during 1994. The laboratory staff submitted and passed 
the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) WS034 study with a 
94% rating. Generally, 80% is acceptable. All water quality 
requirements in Andover were less than the regulatory limits 
set by the EPA for inorganics, volatile organics, synthetic 
organics, trihalomethanes , nitrates and nitrites. The 
laboratory performed over 40,000 tests during the 1994 period. 
The fourth testing period of the lead (Pb) and copper (CU) 
program was completed with the 90th percentiles valueless than 
the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 15 ug/L Pb and 1.3 mg/L 
Cu. respectively. All bacteriological testing and monitoring 
requirements met EPA standards. Giardia, Cryptosporidium and 
enteric viruses have been tested monthly since May 1994. All 
results to date have been negative. CT values average 3-5 
times higher than D.E.P. requirements for Andover finish 
water . 



DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

Wood Park Fence - a considerable amount of time and manpower 
were put into refurbishing the fence. Stone piers were 
rebuilt by Town employees. The "Our Town" employees did all 
of the painting of the wooden sections of the fence. They 
also helped in moving and placing stones for the mason. 

West Middle School - Media Center skylight was replaced. A 
wall was built in the woodshop to make additional classroom 
space. Twelve water coolers were replaced. The 20,000 gallon 
oil tank was removed. Magnetic door closers were installed on 
all classroom doors. 

West Elementary School - new tile floors were installed in six 
classrooms - kindergarten area was recarpeted. Both old and 
new gymnasiums were restriped and sanded. An additional 200 
linear feet of fence was installed. 

Shawsheen School - twelve replacement windows were installed. 
Most of the third floor, the Main Office, Media Center and a 
classroom were recarpeted. A wall was removed in the old 
cafeteria to make a large room for the Kids' Club. Magnetic 
door closers were installed and new lighting was installed on 
the ground floor. Fire alarm pull-stations were added to all 
stairways . 

Bancroft School - entire first floor carpeting, including the 
Media Center and hallway in front of the Main Office, was 
replaced. Skylight was replaced in the cafeteria. Structural 
repairs were completed as a result of the structural study. 
Storm water drains were installed. The driveway and parking 
area was paved. 



10 



1994 Acomplishments/Highlights 
Page Eight 

Ballardvale Fire Station - paving was done and twelve 
replacement windows were installed on the apparatus deck. 

Ballardvale Playground - new playground equipment was 
installed. A new roof was put on the storage shed and new 
doors were installed. 

Town Offices - in cooperation with the Andover Historical 
Society, the Ford's Coffee Shop mural was cleaned, stretched, 
framed and hung in the first floor corridor. A new electric 
generator was installed and a new room was built for it. 

Safety Center - a new generator was installed and the 
electricians assisted in the installation of the E-911 
emergency telephone system. 

DPW/DMM Operations Center - a partition wall was installed to 
separate the maintenance area where the mechanics work from an 
adjacent garage area. This separation will reduce heat loss 
and provide a better working space for the employees. 

Forestry planted trees along the new Bartlet Street sidewalk 
and new shrubs in front of the West Middle School. 

Granite curb was installed on the Chestnut Street and Whittier 
Street sides of The Park. 

The Bald Hill leaf composting area was expanded by 60,000 
square feet. New gates and a walk-in/ drop-off pad were added. 

The Annual Town Meeting authorized the purchase and demolition 
of two houses on Pearson Street. The site was cleared of the 
two houses in December. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Phillips Academy demolished Draper Hall in December. This was 
the result of several years of negotiating with the school 
concerning the structural and fire safety of the building. 

ISO analyzed the Town's fire safety and water distribution 
system in January. The Town maintained its Class 4 rating and 
it can be increased to Class 3 with some additional work. 

Fire Prevention Permitting Office was relocated to the 
Community Development and Planning Department in the Town 
Offices in January to better serve residents and builders. 

Cable and hardware were purchased for voice alarm and the 
installation of the new system has begun. 



11 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Nine 

During Fire Prevention Week in October, over 3,000 students in 
the public and private schools were instructed on fire safety. 
At the annual Open House over 5,000 adults and children toured 
Central Station and climbed aboard various apparatus on 
display. 

Training was completed by ambulance EMT's in the new 
epinephrine auto-injection system to treat persons suffering 
severe allergic reactions. This service will be provided 
starting in January, 1995. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

Law Enforcement Television was installed and implemented. 
This service provides in-house training on current law 
enforcement topics. A follow-up policy on domestic abuse was 
instituted throughout the department. 

Trauma Intervention Program (T.I. P.) was introduced to the 
department . 

Community policing efforts resulted in all area officers being 
more involved with solving problems in their areas. This is 
accomplished by having the area officer solve any and all 
problems in their area whether they are crime related or not. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

Investigated three bank robberies and cleared all of them. 
The Andover Bank was robbed in August and again in September 
by a masked armed robber. During the second robbery, a 
special response plan was in place resulting in the suspect's 
arrest. During November, the Shawmut Bank was robbed by a 
note passer. Investigation resulted in a warrant being issued 
and an arrest made. Seven other bank robberies in the North 
Shore area were cleared by both arrests. 

Seventeen housebreaks were cleared by detectives and a total 
of sixteen people charged with these breaks (does not include 
uniformed officers breaks cleared) . In June there were early 
morning breaks into homes near the center of Town while the 
victims were sleeping. Warrants were issued against two 
suspects for several of the breaks. 

Participated in a Regional Burglary Task Force providing 
technical assistance with latent print recovery. Numerous 
breaks into larger businesses were occurring by cutting alarms 
and professionally cutting safes. Departmental assistance 
resulted in two suspects being charged. 



12 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Ten 

Latent print recovery has resulted in thirty cases being 
cleared. Latent prints were matched in armed robberies, 
housebreaks, recovered stolen vehicles and larcenies. We have 
continued to assist other agencies in latent print recovery at 
serious crime scenes. 

RECORDS DIVISION 

Implemented on-line Court Tracking Program which enables 
department to track the status of all pending and closed court 
cases. 

Installed laptop computers in the marked cruisers which makes 
it possible for patrol to communicate silently with Dispatch 
and other patrol vehicles. It also enables them to link with 
the State and local computer systems and write report 
narratives from their vehicles. 

Received two grants from the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau, 
$10,000 was awarded for OUI, Speed and Pedestrian Enforcement 
and $3,000 was jointly awarded with the State Police for J- 
Step. 

Finalized planning and street addressing throughout the Town 
for activation of E-911 in June, 1995. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

HEALTH DIVISION 

Proposed and implemented first ever local by-law restricting 
smoking in municipal buildings, food service facilities and 
other public buildings. 

Secured $150,000 grant from Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health to form a regional consortium with North Andover, 
Methuen, Middleton and Dracut to address health hazards and 
impacts associated with tobacco. 

Instituted new glucose screening program for Senior Citizens 
to raise awareness of diabetes in elderly sponsored by a grant 
from the Andover Home for Aged. 

Established Town-wide rabies education and control policy to 
address rabies epidemic in raccoons. 

Modified pre-school immunization action plan to target 
unimmunized newborns to six year olds. 



13 



1994 Accomplishments/Highlights 
Page Eleven 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The most important change in the Building Division operation 
has been the on-going transition to a computerized permit 
issuance and data processing system. 

Fire Prevention Services provided at the Building Division has 
improved the customer services to builders seeking various 
types of permits from the Andover Fire Departments Fire 
Prevention Division. 

Both new construction starts and additions/alterations to 
existing structures have continued to be active during 1994. 

Single family home construction starts exceeded ninety homes, 
seven existing subdivisions have either been completed or are 
near completion and construction has either been started or is 
about to start on seven new subdivisions. 

Phillips Academy has continued to renovate and refurbish the 
campus by renovation of the Addison Gallery building, Taylor 
Hall dormitory, Sherman House and Epsom Art Center. The long- 
awaited demolition of Draper Hall at Abbot Campus took place 
in December and plans are presently being prepared for the 
renovation and reuse of the remaining East Wing of Draper Hall 
as well as Abbot Hall. 

Two major industrial projects were completed: at Hewlett 
Packard a new Office/Research and Development complex was 
completed and at Genetics Institute the Clinical Laboratory 
building was completed and occupied. 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 

Several key parcels of land were acquired for conservation 
purposes through funds approved at the 1993 Annual Town 
Meeting. The most significant acquisition is a unique three 
acre parcel within the Haggetts Pond Watershed located off 
Woodhill Road. Tentative agreements have been reached in 
several other negotiations. 

PLANNING DIVISION 

Zoning By-law Study Committee was appointed and they are 
working on the reorganization and redefining of the Zoning By- 
law that governs, defines and regulates the land use. The 
goal of this task force is to provide better and more user- 
friendly regulations, more efficient code enforcement and 
better customer service to Town residents. 



14 



1994 Accompli ishments/Highlights 
Page Twelve 

State officially awarded $1,000,000 PWED grant to the Town for 
the construction of Burtt Road construction. This new road 
will open up 100 acres of land to development and allow major 
expansion of the Genetics Institute facility. 

Planning Division worked at part of Bio-tech Task Force to 
assist the City of Lawrence in the development of RDNA 
Regulations. This is part of an on-going effort to foster 
inter-municipal cooperation with Andover's sister communities. 

$6,000,000 River Road construction project continues. The 
Planning Division was involved in successful negotiations with 
state officials and area residents in resolving problems. 

Coordinated with State officials on Route 125/Gould Road 
traffic signals. This project will provide for major safety 
improvements at a very dangerous intersection. 

Coordinated with State and Phillips Academy on Route 28 safety 
improvements. This project is intended to make that section 
of Route 28 which bisects the Academy more "pedestrian 
friendly" . 

1994 proved to be the busiest year since 1984 for new 
development proposals and land use issues. As quoted in the 
newspaper, the Town experienced a "mini-boom" in new plans and 
new construction in 1994. 



RSS/sac 



15 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and 
reinforce confidence in Town financial management by managing and 
planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost effective 
and responsive manner. Our mission is accomplished through a 
collaboration of team efforts which provide departments and the 
public with the necessary information to record and assure 
accuracy, accountability and justification. 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 1995 Budget was 
released on January 21, 1994. During the months of January, 
February and March, approximately fifteen meetings were held with 
the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to 
review the budget and warrant article requests and prepare 
recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

On March 31, 1994 the Finance Committee Report was mailed to 
10,907 households. The Annual Town Meeting was held on 
April 11, 1994 and the Fiscal Year 1995 operating budget 
(Article 12) was adopted in the amount of $60,223,538. This budget 
was an increase of 3.9% from the fiscal year 1994 operating budget 
(Article 3) of $57,948,466. 

The Annual Town Meeting also voted for a number of capital 
projects and authorized the town to borrow for the following 
pro j ects : 

School Building Program $38,500,000* 

School Technology Program 2,000,000* 

School Architectural Fees 1,000,000 

Road Repair 425,000 

Bridge Repair 150,000 

Water Main Engineering 200,000 

Pearson Street Land Purchase 200,000 

♦Subject to Proposition 2% ballot election. On May 17, 1994 voters passed two 
Debt Exclusion questions, exempting these projects from Proposition 2V4 tax levy 
limitations. 

The Andover Cable Advisory Committee met monthly to discuss 
matters involving TCI Cablevision of Andover and its services to 
Andover customers. TCI serves approximately 7,800 customers in 
town. During the summer, TCI notified the town of TCI's interest 
in license renewal. The existing cable license expires in June, 
1997. As the year ended, the Cable Advisory Committee began its 
discussions regarding the legal requirements for renewal. 

In October, the Town Manager released the FY1996-FY2000 
Capital Improvement Program. This program totalled approximately 
$33 million in projects of which $12.5 million was recommended for 
FY1996. 



16 



The Town borrowed $10 million in October for projects 
authorized by previous Town Meetings. Moody's Investors Services 
confirmed Andover's Aa rating and the bonds were competitively sold 
at an interest rate of 5.6%. The $10 million funds expenditures 
for the following purposes: 

School Building Program $7,448,000 

Pearson Street Land Acquisition 200,000 

Conservation Land Acquisition 270,000 

Bridge Repair 150,000 

Road Repair 425,000 

Water Mains 1,307,000 

Water Engineering Plans 200,000 

An additional $1,500,000 was borrowed to fund costs associated 
with the school building program. Spending requirements, mandated 
by the State's Education Reform Act, resulted in a Special Town 
Meeting on December 5, 1994. In late November, a special Finance 
Committee report was mailed to over 11,000 households. Article 1 
amended Article 12 of the Annual Town budget and appropriated 
$600,460 to the School department and $109,526 for other 
departmental purposes. The final FY1995 budget, including all non- 
appropriated expenses, was $64,893,668 or 7% over the FY1994 budget 
of $60,638,805. This budget includes $1,732,184 in debt service 
for the school building program. A four-year budget, tax rate and 
revenue comparison shows information for FY1992, FY1993, FY1994, 
and FY1995. 

Several members of the Finance Department served on the local 
Total Quality Steering Committee and staff from the Tax 
Collector/Treasurer, Finance, and Data Processing Offices have been 
involved in three different TQM projects. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

During 1994 there were approximately 1,851 purchase orders 
processed for the Town, 2,721 purchase orders processed for the 
School Department, and 4,599 Requests for Payment. Approximately 
42 bid openings were held, plus 14 Requests for Proposals. The 
continued use of State bids and contracts has proved to be 
beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more political 
subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a wide range of 
goods and services such as: paper products for copy machines, 
police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels and 
supplies. 

Some examples of major bids and proposals put out by Central 
Purchasing in 1994 are as follows: 

Heavy Duty Dump Trucks (3) 
• Bancroft School Drainage Improvements 



17 



Library Front Entrance 

Painting of Road Markings 

School supplies and equipment 

School Lunch (7 items) 

Parks & Grounds Equipment 

Miscellaneous road materials and concrete pipes 

Office supplies, equipment and furniture 

Hazardous Waste Transportation and Disposal 

Andover High Additions and Renovations 

South Elementary Additions and Renovations 

Engineering & Design Work for Recreation Park 

The Office of Central Purchasing is responsible for contract 
compliance regarding Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan, insurance 
coordination and risk management for all Town and School 
departments with the exception of health and personal insurance, 
which is handled by the Personnel Department. 

Areas of importance in the early 90' s where Central Purchasing 
and insurance coordination were able to save time and dollars for 
the Town are as follows: 

Insurance request for proposals resulted in a $300,000 

savings to the Town 

Collaborative bid on Gasoline & Diesel Fuel involving 12 towns 

Collaborative bid on Fuel Oil (#2 & #4) involving 7-10 towns 

Collaborative bid on copy machine paper involving 7 towns 

Collaborative bid on Student Insurance involving 5 towns 

Introduction of a new catastrophe Accident Medical Insurance 

or Interscholastic Athletics 

Coverage for all Interscholastic Athletics and Band activities 

Introduction of various other insurance coverages available to 

students throughout the year 

Contracts for various major projects throughout the Town 

Creation of Safety Handbook for all Town and School employees 

Establishing safety programs for all Town and School employees 

Created and continuously update Workers Compensation packet of 

procedures and applicable forms by Elaine Shola who personally 

explained contents of packet to each school and each 

department 

Introduction of various programs to the advantage of the Town 

and School employees 

rOfuri-m R/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer's Division is responsible for the 
collection and disbursement of all Town monies including trust 
funds. 

Some of the highlights of the Treasurer's Office for the year 
1994 are as follows: 



18 



Instituted a policy of wire transfers for all debt payments, 

eliminating check processing and earning several more days' 

interest . 

Reviewed and consolidated miscellaneous trust funds into a 

structured trust agreement. Other specific trusts will be 

added in 1995 eliminating bank books and statements and 

increasing yield. 

Started a long process of document storage, retrieval, and 

microfilming. 

After issuing several BANS, successfully borrowed 10 million 

dollars, at a rate below budget, for the first phase of the 

school building projects. 

Solicited and reviewed bids for a new excise tax program. 

Attended the annual school for Collector/Treasurers at the 

University of Massachusetts in Amherst during the month of 

August . 

Ordered and installed the necessary software to electronically 

distribute the state payroll withholding taxes with plans to 

expand to most payroll deductions in 1995. 

Informational letter about Town services included with every 

lien certificate. 



VETERANS SERVICES 

Fourteen families were assisted with funds to help pay for 
fuel, food, medical and personal needs. The Town is reimbursed for 
75% of these expenditures by the State according to Chapter 115 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Eight veterans were admitted to Veterans Administration 
hospitals. Forty-five veterans died in 1994. One from World War 
I, thirty-four World War II, nine from the Korean War and one from 
the Vietnam War. 



DATA PROCESSING 

The Data Processing division is responsible for the 
development, modification and maintenance of all computer 
applications resident in the central DEC computer system. During 
1994, some major highlights were: 

selection of motor vehicle excise billing/AR system 

computerization of salary schedules to link with payroll 

system for all seven bargaining units 

developed computer tape program for payment of property tax 

escrow accounts from banks who use tax services. 

modified sewer bills to reflect State sewer grant credit for 

all sewer customers 



19 



TEN TOP TAXPAYERS - FISCAL 1995 



Taxpayer Name 

1) Raytheon 

2) Andover Mills Realty Ltd. Partnership 

3) Hewlett-Packard Company 

4) Digital Equipment Corp. 

5) Gillette Company 

6) Genetics Institute, Inc. 

7) Comecticutt General Life Ins. Co. 

6) Prudential Insurance Corp. of America 

9) New England Tel. t Tel. 

10) Massachusetts Electric Co. 



Property 


Total Taxable 


Total 


Taxable 


Total Tax 


Percent of 


Type 


Real Property 


Personal 


Property 


Assessed 


Total Levy 


Industrial 


$68,785,100 






$1,662,356.30 


3.466X 


Commercial 


$50,297,400 






$1,213,774.62 


2.531X 


Industrial 


$41,465,500 






$1,000,860.22 


2.087X 


Industrial 


$35,226,145 






$852,120.45 


1.777X 


Industrial 


$25,971,600 






$628,253.00 


1.310% 


Industrial 


$21,171,400 






$512,136.17 


1.068X 


Commercial 


$20,779,400 






$498,861.04 


1.040X 


Commercial 


$19,503,800 






$471,353.84 


0.983X 


Utility 


$5,377,200 


$12 


,133,200 


$423,576.58 


0.883X 


Utility 


$1,016,900 


$14,762,500 


$377,072.84 


0.786X 


Total 


$289,594,445 


$26,895,700 


$7,640,365.05 


15.932X 


Grand Value 


$316,490,145 











FIVE ADDITIONAL TOP TAXPAYERS - FISCAL 1995 



Taxpayer Name 



1) Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 

2) C A Investment Trust 

3) American Real Estate Holdings/GCA 

4) RUF, Inc 

5) Trustees of Phillips Academy 



Property 
Type 



Commercial 
Resd/Comm 
Industrial 
Industrial 
Residential 

Total 

Grand Value 



Total Taxable Total Taxable 
Real Property Personal Property 



$13,009,100 
$15,702,200 
$11,747,500 
$11,325,800 
$16,106,000 

$67,890,600 

$68,625,600 



$735,000 



$735,000 



Total Tax 


Percent of 


Assessed 


Total Levy 


$331,289.30 


0.691X 


$304,869.49 


0.636X 


$282,613.50 


0.589X 


$273,971.10 


0.571X 


$266,850.08 


0.556X 


$1,459,593.47 


3.044X 



FIFTEEN TOP REAL ESTATE ASSESSMENTS - FISCAL 1995 



Taxpayer Name 

1) Andover Mills Realty Ltd. Partnership 

2) Hewlett-Packard Company 

3) Raytheon Co. 

4) Bolger, David F Rev. Tr (Raytheon) 

5) Gillette Company 

6) Genetics Institute, Inc. 

7) Digital Equipment Corp. 

8) RUF, Inc. (Cressey Dockhem) 

9) American Real Estate Holdings 

10) Comecticutt General Life Ins. Co. 

11) Digital Equipment Corp. 

12) Merrimac Mutual Fire Insurance 

13) Brookside Estates LP 

14) Riverview Commons 

15) Dynamics Research Corporation 



Property 


Real Property 


Type 


Assessment 


Office 


$49,409,100 


Industrial 


$40,753,700 


Industrial 


$35,062,900 


Industrial 


$33,423,300 


Industrial 


$25,947,300 


Industrial 


$21,133,600 


Industrial 


$17,310,880 


Industrial 


$11,088,600 


Industrial 


$11,020,700 


Hotel 


$10,650,300 


Industrial 


$10,543,700 


Office 


$10,313,500 


Apartments 


$10,080,400 


Apartments 


$9,120,700 


Office 


$7,435,400 


Totals 


$303,294,080 



Percent of 


Total Tax 


Percent of 


Total Value 


Assessed 


Total Levy 


1.846X 


$1,192,286.65 


2.486X 


1.523X 


$985,832.00 


2.056X 


1.310X 


$847,792.69 


1.768X 


1.249X 


$808,144.59 


1.685X 


0.970X 


$627,665.19 


1.309X 


0.790X 


$511,221.78 


1.066X 


0.647X 


$418,750.19 


0.873X 


0.414X 


$268,233.23 


0.559X 


0.412X 


$266,590.73 


0.556X 


0.398X 


$257,630.76 


0.537X 


0.394X 


$255,052.10 


0.532X 


0.385X 


$249,483.57 


0.520X 


0.377X 


$161,891.22 


0.338X 


0.341X 


$146,478.44 


0.305X 


0.278X 


$179,862.33 


0.375X 



11.332X $7,176,915.47 



14.966X 



20 



TOWN OF ANDOVER BUDGET 





FY1992 


FY1993 


FY1994 


FY1995 


EXPENDITURES 

Appropriations & Articles 


53,196,677 


54,796,857 


58,128,449 


60,602,824 


Other Local Expenditures: 
Tax Title Purposes 
Final Court Judgements 
Overlay/ Other Deficits 
Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 
Debt Service 

Total Local Expenditures 


25,000 
40,156 

529,416 

62360 



657,432 


40,000 
162,482 

90,922 

533,403 



826307 


38,900 



537,845 

38,830 



615,575 


20,000 



653,461 

70350 

1,732,184 

2,475,995 


State and County Charges 
Overlay Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 


941,683 
704,669 


1,023,998 
643348 


1,096^83 
798,198 


1,093,634 
721,215 


55,500,461 


57,291,010 


60,638,805 


64,893,668 










Estimated Receipts from State: 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 

Total from State 


2,979,927 

5,128 

2,985,055 


3,420,951 

21,999 

3,442,950 


3,771,132 

23,256 

3,794388 


4,068,046 

27457 

4,095,603 


Estimated Local Receipts: 
Local Estimated Receipts 
Offset Receipts 

Total Local Receipts 


11,134,111 

513,462 

11,647473 


10,670,000 

609,429 

11,279,429 


11,226,500 

652,979 

11379,479 


11420400 

570,220 

12,090,720 


Free Cash and Other Revenue: 
Free Cash — Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Revenue Sharing 

Total Other Appropriations 


1,000 

287,031 



288,031 


264 
244,453 

244,717 


179,983 
309406 

489,489 


54300 
397,909 

452,209 


Free Cash — Operating Budget 








200,000 


300,000 


Total Estimated Receipts 


14,920,659 


14,967,096 


16363356 


16,938432 


Total Property Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES 


40,579302 


42323,914 


44,275,449 


47,955,136 


55,500,461 


57,291,010 


60,638,805 


64,893,668 



VALUATIONS & TAX RATES 

TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 


FY1992 


FY1993 


FY1994 


FY1995 


2303,016 


2,766,943 


2,624,173 


2,676333 


RESroENTIALTAX RATE 


13.26 


14.10 


15.14 


16.06 


COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 


1737 


1836 


22.78 


24.19 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


14.48 


1530 


16.87 


17.92 



WHERE REVENUES COME FROM 

STATE ADD 
LOCAL REVENUE 
OTHER FUNDS 
FREE CASH 
PROPERTY TAXES 


FY1992 


FY1993 


FY1994 


FY1995 


538% 

20.99% 

042% 

0.00% 

73.12% 


6.01% 

19.69% 

0.43% 

0.00% 

73.88% 


6.26% 

1949% 

0.81% 

033% 

73.02% 


631% 

18.63% 

0.70% 

0.46% 

73.90% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



21 



FINANCE AND BUDGET 
ANNUAL STATISTICAL REPORT 



1992 



1993 



1994 



Billing Statistics 
Real Estate tax accounts 
Real Estate tax bills 
Personal Property tax accounts 
Personal Property tax bills 
Motor Vehicle Excise bills 

Water accounts 

Water bills (Not inc specials) 

Sewer accounts 

Sewer bills (Not inc specials) 



Other Statistics 
Municipal Lien certificates processed 
W-2s issued- Town 
W-2s issued- School 
Parking tickets processed 
Purchase Orders processed- Town 
Purchase Orders processed- School 
Other Payments processed-Town 
Fin Com Annual Town Meeting Reports mailed 
Fin Com Special Town Meeting Reports mailed 
Cable TV subscribers 
Town FTE employees 
Number of Retirees 



10,490 


10,486 


10,706 


41,960 


41,944 


42,824 


310 


388 


353 


1,240 


1,552 


1,412 


28,552 


28,727 


28,046* 




4 


'not final 


9348 


9,481 


9,618 


18,696 


18,962 


19,236 


4,590 


4,622 


4,651 


9,180 


9,244 


9302 




3,234 


2,655 


637 


626 


698 


836 


823 


868 


10,100 


11,123 


12,049 


1,661 


1,719 


1,851 


2,690 


2,530 


2,721 


4,151 


4^98 


4,599 


10,780 


10,827 


10,907 


10,800 


10,895 


11,011 


7,488 


7,571 


7,858 


305.4 


304.6 


309.9 


277 


296 


296 



Real Estate Exemptions 

cl.41 

cl22 

cl37 

Others 

Dollars exempted 



46 


49 


67 


211 


199 


192 


19 


17 


21 


71 


72 


74 


$168,405 


$174,149 


$182,875 



22 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1004 









BALANCE 








BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCPAL 


JULY 1,1003 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


JUNE 30. 1004 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




075,43346 


60.000.00 


26.220.26 




1,061.662.72 


RETFEMENT 


TOWN 




0.00 








0.00 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




654,47563 




16,422.23 




672,607.66 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




206,00561 




0,400.33 




306,40404 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 






162.347.22 


00.000.00 


8.315.48 




280,66270 


POST WAR REHABIUTATION 


TOWN 




30.463.05 




066.13 




31.431.18 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5.766.63 


8.521.35 




270.62 




6.702.17 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




17,400.66 




423.53 


5.500.00 


12,414.30 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






106.04 




6.57 




20261 


CD&P -ROGERS BROOK 






3,650.35 




61.42 




3,020.77 


TDJ-SPECIAL 




14.300.00 


0.00 








0.00 


TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 






1,134,340.06 


5.075.220.06 


16.127.X 


5,564,045.10 


1.663.661.18 


M.V. LBRARY CONSORTIUM 


LBRARY 




276,723.55 


300,000 00 


14.423.59 


260,000.00 


331.147.14 


J. GREELEY 


LBRARY 


5.000.00 


5,000.00 




167.61 


167.61 


5,000.00 


MARGARET & TOWLE 


PRINCPAL 


345.62&S0 


345,62550 








345,62550 


MARGARET G TOWLE 


INCOME 




113.36477 




35,700.60 


6,043.42 


140,14204 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD&COAL 


5.000.00 


31,562.23 




1,047.65 




33,530.06 


DAVD& LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10,000.00 


27.640.60 




026.27 




28,576.07 


W.L RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7,845.81 


27.304.70 


25.13 


014.71 




28.244.63 


AJ. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


1 £487.70 




307.10 




12,804.80 


El. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1.302.77 


1.500.00 




50.25 


50.25 


1,500.00 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


002.02 




33.26 




1.026.16 


SPRING GROVE 






575.441.40 


28,650.00 


16.470.36 


671.32 


610.600.54 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


PRINCPAL 




17.700.73 








17.700.73 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


INTERSET 




1.042.50 




65.07 


65.07 


1,042.50 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


LOT SALES 




122,40454 


14.200.00 


3,317.62 




140,01216 


WEST PARISH 






2.310.00 




77.30 


77.30 


2.310.00 


CHRIST CHURCH 






7.610.00 




254.04 


254.04 


7.610.00 


ST. AUGUSTINES 






650.00 




21.76 


21.76 


650.00 


EMIUNE LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 


1,000.00 


1.000.00 




33.50 


33.50 


1.000.00 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 




544.60 




18.24 


10.24 


544.60 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




31.665.07 




1,060.61 




32,726.78 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




7,632.10 




146.10 


2,806.75 


5.160.54 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCPAL 




24,416.51 


021.35 


515.76 


1,200.00 


24.565.62 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1,000.00 


7.601.60 




257.67 


60.00 


7,680.27 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 




0.00 








0.00 


FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1.120.67 




37.5S 


60.00 


1.008.42 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.68 


030.47 




31.17 


100.00 


661.64 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


166.47 




15.57 




204.04 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


8,281.07 




277.42 




6,558.40 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


6.431.06 




215.44 




6.646.52 


A&A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1,000.00 


4.310.51 




144.70 




4.464.21 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLAR SHP 


506.50 


508.50 








508.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






055.31 


140.00 


32.00 


160.00 


067.31 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


250.00 


836.41 




26.02 




664.43 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


616.76 




20.66 




637.42 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


50.00 


376.16 




1£67 




300.85 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 


4.074,470.55 


6.460.106.44 


150.04000 


5.644.327.46 


5.750,249.62 



23 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long- 
time resident of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to 
the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. 
Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from 
this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement of 
assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who 
may be in need of aid, comfort or support on account of old age, 
disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen 
by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance with the 
terms of Mrs. Towle' s will. The cases are referred to the Trustees 
by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and 
interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on eight 
(8) cases, disbursing $12,923.12 on approved cases (which numbered 
8) and small administration expenses. Only the income of the Fund 
is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial 
portion of the current income is invested under the direction of 
the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer 
upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1993 $115,817.77 
Receipts - 1994 38.601.07 

$154,418.84 
Disbursements - 1994 12.923.12 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1994 $141,495.72 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 
17 of the 1893 Annual Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left 
to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to purchase wood or 
coal. Three trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the 
Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 

Balance on hand 7/1/93 $31,582.23 
Income 1993/1994 1.947.85 

Balance as of 7/1/93 $33,530.08 



24 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

STATMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1994 

SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



12/31/83 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



12/31/94 



PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 0.00 -GAIN ON SALE OF SECURITIES 

SECURrTIES AT BOOK VALUE 1M.073.18 -BROKERAGE FEES/TAX 

-INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 
-TRANSFERS FROM RESERVE FUND 
RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 



COST OR MARKET 



0.00 -ADJUSTMENT TO COST/MARKET RESERVE 



(518.75) PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 2,221.31 

(880.82) SECURrTIES AT BOOK VALUE 183.210.01 

(1.385.85) 

1,250.28 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 



0.00 COST OR MARKET 



0.00 



106,073.10 



DECREASE 



(1.534.04) 



105.438.22 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 

(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



4,583.12 

2.278.00 DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 
1,275.24 INTEREST RECEIVED-BONDS/NOTES 
INTEREST RECEIVED-OTHER 



NET INCOME 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 
1 ,726.25 CASH IN BANK - CHECKING 
6,768.78 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 
367.66 



8,137.02 INCOME TOTAL 


8.862.60 


EXPENSES 




ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS 


4.713.74 


MISC.OPERATING EXPENSES 


502.41 


EXPENSE TOTAL 


5,216.15 



3,646.54 



4,681.67 
1.123.82 
4.718.70 



10.524.28 



-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJECT FUNDS 
-10% OF INCOME (1/1-12/31/03) 

TOTAL TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL 

INCREASE 



373.28 (7/1/03 - 6/30/04) 
886.00 



1.250.28 
2.387.26 



175.110.18 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



175.062.50 



25 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1994 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 









CURRENT 


ADDITIONS 










BALANCE TRANSFERRED 


YEAR 


TO 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/84 


INCOME 


NET INCOME 


PRINCIPAL 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/94 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


2,791 .05 




65.66 




2,856.71 




2,856.71 


J.W.BARNARD 


7,282.34 




174.31 




7,456.65 


510.00 


6,946.65 


ALICE M.BELL 


1,096.64 




26.30 




1,122.94 


26.00 


1 ,096.94 


EDNA G.CHAPIN 


2,502.93 




60.03 




2,562.96 


60.00 


2,502.96 


FRED W.DOYLE 


11,719.14 




278.98 




11,998.12 


1 ,000.00 


10,998.12 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1 ,632.34 




39.15 




1 ,671 .49 


39.00 


1 ,632.49 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


1 ,950.26 




46.82 




1 ,997.08 




1 ,997.08 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1 ,096.63 




26.30 




1,122.93 


26.00 


1 ,096.93 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1 ,099.01 




26.36 




1,125.37 


26.00 


1 ,099.37 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


2,687.23 




64.50 




2,751 .73 


65.00 


2,686.73 


MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 




977.44 


296.88 


25,000.00 (A) 26,274.32 


1 ,000.00 


25,274.32 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


10,000.27 




247.68 


385.16 (B) 


10,633.11 


248.00 


10,385.11 


ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 




2,104.53 


237.51 


20,000.00 (A) 22,342.04 


2,000.00 


20,342.04 


HENRY WYATT 






46.22 


3,891 .98 (C) 


3.938.20 




3,938.20 


RESERVE- COST OR MKT. 






(2,690.68) 




(2,690.68) 




(2,690.68) 




43.857.84 


3.081 .97 


(1 .053.98) 


49.277.14 


95.162.97 


5.000.00 


90.162.97 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

INTEREST INCOME 
DIVIDEND INCOME 

INCOME TRANSFERRED FROM BAYBANK 
GAIN/(LOSS) ON SALE OF SECURITES 
BROKERAGE FEES/TAXES 
INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES 
AD J.TO LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 
NET INCOME 



(A) Administration of funds transferred from BayBank 

(B) Gift from Andover Community for Education 

(C) New fund established by Town Employees 



2,978.21 
244.50 

3,081 .97 
(800.00) 
(247.51) 
(538.51) 

(2,690.68) 



2.027.98 



FUNDS/SECURITIES HELD 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

1 00 SHARES MERCK & CO 

200 SHARES TECO ENERGY, INC 

100 SHARES WACHOVIA CORP. NEW 

$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.000%, 1 1/30/97 

$10,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.000%, 12/31/97 

$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 5.125%, 3/31/98 

$5,000 PEPSICO INC. NOTE. 6.250%. 9/1/99 

$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.375%. 8/15/02 

$5,000 IBM NOTE 7.250%, 11/1/02 

$20,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.25%. 2/15/03 

$25,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 5.5%. 4/30/96 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


3,837.46 


3,837.46 


3,812.50 


3.675.00 


4,050.00 


3,825.00 


3,225.00 


3.587.50 


4,768.75 


4,985.10 


9,525.00 


9,987.20 


4,618.75 


4,985.85 


4.608.20 


4,870.00 


4,579.70 


4,804.30 


4,675.00 


4,961 .85 


18,087.60 


18,600.00 


24,375.00 


24,734.38 




(2,690.68) 


90.162.96 


90.162.96 



26 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

FUND ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1994 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 





MARKET 
VALUE 


MARKET VALUE 


BOOK 
VALUE 


OVER 
BOOK VALUE 



2.221 .31 2.221 .31 



0.00 



SECURITIES 
STOCK 



200 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
200 SHARES 



ALBERTSONS INC. 
AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING 
CENTRAL & SOUTHWEST CORP 
EXXON CORP 
GRAINGER. W. W. INC. 
ILLINOIS TOOL WORKS, INC. 
INT. BUSINESS MACHINE 
KIMBERLY CLARK CORP 
MINNESOTA MINING MFG. 
MOTOROLA INC. 
PFIZER. INC. 

SOUTHWESTERN BELL CORP 
WACHOVIA CORP 
TOTAL STOCK 



OTHER 



$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.00%, DUE 11/30/97 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 8.125%, DUE 2/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 7.125%. DUE 10/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 6.375%, DUE 8/15/02 
$10,000 PEPSICO INC. NOTE, 6.250%, DUE 9/1/99 
$10,000 IBM NOTE, 7.250%, DUE 11/1/02 
$20,000 WACHOVIA CORP NOTE. 6.375%, DUE 4/15/03 

TOTAL OTHER 

TOTAL SECURITIES 



4,575.00 


5,800.00 


1 ,225.00 


5.062.50 


5,850.00 


787.50 


2,812.50 


2,262.50 


(550.00) 


5.887.50 


6,075.00 


187.50 


6,187.50 


5,775.00 


(412.50) 


3,787.50 


4,375.00 


587.50 


6,325.00 


7.350.00 


1.025.00 


5,762.50 


5.037.50 


(725.00) 


5,587.50 


5.337.50 


(250.00) 


1,606.25 


5.800.00 


4.193.75 


6,412.50 


7.725.00 


1.312.50 


4,162.50 


4.037.50 


(125.00) 


6.562.50 


6.450.00 


(112.50) 


64.731.25 


71 ,875.00 


7,143.75 


14,955.30 


,14,306.25 


(649.05) 


14,680.58 


15.126.60 


446.02 


14,878.13 


14,686.05 


(192.08) 


14,412.90 


13,739.10 


(673.80) 


9.740.00 


9,216.40 


(523.60) 


9.874.35 


9,350.00 


(524.35) 


19,944.40 


17,416.60 


(2,527.80) 


98,485.66 


93,841.00 


(4,644.66) 


163,216.91 


165,716.00 


2,499.09 



RESERVE-LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



0.00 



165.438.22 167.937.31 



2.499.09 



RESERVE FUND 



RESERVE CASH 

ANDOVER SAVINGS BANK PRIME ACCOUNT 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



4,681 .67 
4,718.79 

9.400.46 9.400.46 



0.00 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT 
BAYBANK 

TOTAL FUNDS 



1.123.82 1.123.82 



175.962.50 178.461.59 



0.00 



2.499.09 



27 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk's office is to uphold the 
integrity of the Town's democratic process, to maintain and 
preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the 
community and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality 
service. 

It was a busy election year in 1994. The following figures 
show the voter turnout for elections held during the year: 

Town Election - March 28 2,832 - 16% of registered voters 

Special Town Election - May 17 7,765 - 42% of registered voters 

State Primary - September 20 4, 292-24% of registered voters 

General Election - November 8 13,954 - 75% of registered voters 

The Board of Registrars registered 1632 new voters in 1994 
compared to 679 in 1993 - a increase of 240%. These figures are 
reflective of a busy election year as well as a major change in the 
State voter registration system which allows a mail-in registration 
form to be filled out by a voter and sent directly to the Town 
Clerk's Office. Over 1,000 registrations were processed from July 
1st through October 1st - the last day to register to vote for the 
November State Election. The year ended with 18,620 registered 
voters in the Town*s 8 precincts are as follows: 



1 - 2207 3 - 2234 


5 - 2481 


7 


- 2228 


2 - 2336 4 - 2294 


6 - 2388 


8 


- 2452 




1992 




1,993 


1994 


Births Recorded: 


315 




312 


289 


Marriages Recorded: 


201 




202 


202 


Deaths Recorded: 


228 




241 


227 


Dog Licenses Sold: 


1,796 


1 


,944 


1,911 


Fishing & Hunting Licenses Sold: 


713 




739 


643 


Population: 31,076 


30, 


,239 


31,185 


REVENUES COLLECTED - 1994: 










Marriage Licenses 








$ 2,955.00 


Certified Copies 








9,729.00 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings 






4,916.00 


Miscellaneous Licenses Income 






14,445.00 


Liquor Licenses Income 








109,305.00 


Business Certificate Filings 








1,915.00 


Miscellaneous Income (Street 


Lists , 


Maps, 


, etc.) 


7,603.00 


Dog Licenses 








7,869.00 


Non Criminal Violations 








825.00 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses 




TOTAL 




12.514.95* 
$172,077.10 



* $12,180.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries 
and Game — $334.20 was retained by the Town of Andover. 



28 



ME M O RI AL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available 
a broad range of library materials, to provide up-to-date and 
accurate information, to offer services and programs desired by the 
community of Andover, to act as the most convenient point of access 
for the needed materials and information and to actively seek to 
make community members and organizations aware of library resources 
and services. 

In 1994 the Memorial Hall Library continued to serve the 
community of Andover in ways both new and old. At all times, the 
staff and administration strove to fulfill the Library's mission 
which is to make available a broad range of materials, to provide 
up-to-date and accurate information and to offer the services and 
programs most desired by the community. Among the achievements of 
1994 were the following: 

The development and completion of a community survey designed 
to provide information about how Andover residents use the 
library and how to increase future usage. This survey 
provided much of the data needed by the Library's Long Range 
Planning Committee. 

The completion of Memorial Hall Library's Long Range Plan 
document covering the period 1994 - 1997. This document 
includes an Action Plan of 8 goals with 22 associaetd 
objectives and 60 activities. 

A 37% increase in state reimbursed support for regional 
activities at Memorial Hall Library which translates into 
increased reference staff and materials for library users and 
increased backup support in reference, inter-library loan and 
delivery for the 37 cities and towns in northeastern 
Massachusetts . 

The Reference Department added 10 "EBSCO" work stations which 
provide indexing and abstracting to 490 periodicals and full 
text for 125 periodicals. Health, business, music, film, and 
social science information is also provided through these work 
stations . 

• In the Children's Library, special programs such as "Baby 
Talk", Summer Reading, Puppet Shows, "Readers of the Round 
Table", and Children's Book Week activities complemented the 
increased circulation of Children's materials. 

5th grade classes visited the Library for a tour and 
orientation. 

A CD-ROM work station with a periodical search data base and 
Grolier's Encyclopedia was installed. 



29 



The Young Adult Librarian developed a summer volunteer program 
for Teens and a summer reading program entitled "Reach Out and 
Read". A Young Adult Advisory Group has been formed and a 
popular CD collection is being added to the list of Young 
Adult services. 

The Circulation Department has increased the availability of 
popular titles with a subscription to the McNaughton Book 
Plan. Library patrons will have shorter waits for the new 
fiction they want to read. 

The Library added a voice mail system to provide direct access 
to departments and to improve service to patrons at the front 
desk of the library. 

Shirley McGrath retired in April after serving the Town of 
Andover for 15^ years as Assistant Director of the Library. Beth 
Mazin, who worked at the Philadelphia Free Library for 13 years and 
as a personnel manager in business before coming to the Memorial 
Hall Library as a reference librarian in 1987, was promoted to that 
position. Glenda Schaake was promoted to the position of Head of 
Reference in July after having worked in that department for the 
past 10 years. 

With the focus provided by the Long Range Plan to guide us, 
the Trustees, Director and Staff of Memorial Hall Library look 
forward to providing the best possible library services for the 
residents of Andover in 1995 and towards the 21st Century. 



CIRCULATION 



1994 



1993 



1992 



Adult Books & Other Print 

Children's Books & Other Print 

Periodicals 

Adult Sound Recordings 

Adult Videos 

Children's Videos 

Other Children's 

Museum Passes 



TOTAL 



OTHER STATISTICS 



Reference Questions 

Periodicals Owned 

Programs 

Program Attendance 

Reserves Placed 

Interlibrary Loan Requests 

Memorial Hall and Meeting Room Use 



204,720 


214,321 


213,987 


167,154 


158,588 


161,749 


34,047 


38,271 


39,681 


32,029 


28,667 


30,289 


25,859 


24,914 


24,915 


9,751 


6,658 


5,989 


8,293 


7,703 


8,478 


1,575 


1,395 


1,498 


483,428 


480,517 


486,586 


33,598 


31,850 


31,187 


413 


423 


421 


283 


262 


287 


7,056 


7,685 


10,471 


10,137 


8,599 


10,554 


9,623 


2,532 


2,600 


431 


403 





30 



5 YR CIRC TRENDS 



500,000 
450.000 




Adult Circulation 
Children Circulation 
Total Circ 



o 


V™ 


CM 


CO 


^f 


o> 


o> 


CD 


CO 


o> 


o> 


o> 


O) 


o> 


o> 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 1994, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before 
State Courts and Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were 
researched and rendered to Town officials. Court challenges to 
decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by 
Town Counsel. Administrative proceedings and lawsuits were 
commenced to enforce compliance with state statutes and the Town's 
by-laws . 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other 
Town officials on almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all 
Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. During the 
period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed 
and numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted 
and recorded. In particular, two projects are noteworthy: the 
expansion and renovation plans for the South Elementary School and 
Andover High School resulted in extensive legal work required for 
the negotiation and drafting of contract documents and the filing 
of a case at the Department of Public Utilities to eliminate the 
sounding of train whistles in the Town of Andover. The Town case 
was denied by the Department of Public Utilities. Voters at the 
Special Town Meeting in November gave the Board of Selectmen the 
authority to ask for special legislation to eliminate the sounding 
of train whistles in the Town. The Town's petition was filed by 
the Legislature and will be heard in 1995. 



31 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our 
future and the quality of life in Andover. We are empowered to 
protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social problems, our agency has become more service- 
oriented to the community. To continue our mission, we will 
maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of 
life that we all enjoy in Andover. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The year 1994 saw a decrease in most crime categories. This 
is a credit to the dedication of the men and women of the Police 
Department who have aggressively worked on cases and made 
apprehensions. The education on domestic violence and the 
implementation of the Community Policing Program played a major 
role in this reduction. 

The department completed its third and final phase of their 
program to equip all officers with portable radios which increases 
officer safety and improved efficiency. 

RECORDS DIVISION 

A new program placing mobile computers in cruisers was 
instituted allowing officers to do reports in their vehicles, thus, 
increasing time on the street. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

During 1994, members of the Detective Division investigated 
388 reported incidents. The total number of investigations were 
down but serious crimes such as robberies arson, etc. increased. 
Several investigations required numerous manhours of investigation. 

The department attempted to locate latent print evidence at 
124 crime scenes. As a result, latent print matches were connected 
to 31 suspects. The department has assisted other police 
departments with recovery of physical evidence or confirming latent 
print matches. The breakdown by types of cases matched with latent 
prints is as follows: 

16 - breaking and entering 
5 - stolen vehicles 
7 - armed robberies 
2 - unarmed robberies 
1 - larceny 



32 



During the year, the Detective Division processed a total of 
496 booking photographs, 214 handgun permits and 119 firearms 
identification cards. Over 100 local residents were fingerprinted 
on request for adoption, employment or application for citizenship. 
Investigations of check frauds resulted in recovery of $7,609.54 
through payments or court action. 

The Detective Division investigated 40 juvenile cases with 
most of the cases involving stubborn children. A total of 48 
juveniles were involved in the above incidents. Most of the 
juvenile cases requiring court action were sent to the Juvenile 
Diversion Program. 

The Detective Division conducted background investigations on 
applicants for appointment as reserve police officers during this 
past year. The investigations are extensive and require numerous 
hours. Thorough investigations of each applicant were made to 
ensure a proper and fair selection process. 



NATURE OF INCIDENT 

Break and Enter 

Robbery 

Larceny 

Rape 

Sexual Offenses 

Juvenile 

Larceny by Check 

Assist other Police Depts. 

Annoying Calls 

Death Reports 



INCID1 




1993 


108 


-38 cleared 


2 


- 2 cleared 


37 


- 24 cleared 


3 


- 3 cleared 


2 


- 2 cleared 


39 


-38 cleared 


22 


-21 cleared 


19 


- 19 cleared 


14 


-10 cleared 


12 


- 10 cleared 



1994 



96 




18 


cleared 


8 


- 


5 


cleared 


23 


- 


15 


cleared 


1 


- 


1 


cleared 


2 


- 


2 


cleared 


41 


- 


41 


cleared 


23 


- 


20 


cleared 


25 


- 


25 


cleared 


16 


- 


15 


cleared 


6 


- 


5 


cleared 




1990 



1991 



1992 



1993 



1994 



Total Incidents 



U 



33 



Andover Police Department 

Annual Summary 



1990 



1991 



1992 



1993 



1994 



Total Incidents 


25,508 


22,905 


22,023 


24,337 


23,807 


Adult Arrests 


655 


530 


476 


529 


469 


Juvenile Arrests 


63 


19 


28 


47 


40 


Total Arrests 


718 


549 


504 


576 


509 


Rape 


5 


5 


4 


8 


3 


B&E 


180 


170 


175 


172 


156 


Assault 


81 


67 


87 


72 


93 


Larceny 


611 


467 


587 


386 


506 


Stolen MV 


169 


161 


152 


145 


115 


Stolen Bicycles 


56 


100 


69 


40 


55 


Domestic Abuse 


31 


24 


28 


33 


30 


MV Fatalities 


4 


3 


4 


2 


3 


MV Accidents 


1,170 


1,106 


1,182 


1,224 


1,240 


Vandalism 


. 327 


341 


282 


304 


337 


Parking Violations 


11,674 


9,699 


10,100 


11,123 


12,049 


MV Citations 


4,152 


3,023 


3,025 


3,179 


4,105 


Mileage 


430,545 


414,764 


403,983 


381,758 


303,893 


Gasoline 


46,001 


49,694 


44,045 


36,281 


35,339 



34 



Andover Police Department 

MV Accident Summary 



1200 



Number of Accidents 



1000 - 
800 - 
600 - 
400- 
200 




965 



25 

L ^ 



5 ^ 



891 



27$ 

m 



^ 



832 



257 

J 



1989 



1990 



1991 



945 



974 



25* 



P 



246 
P 

i 



1992 



1993 



1041 



19$ 



1994 



Fatality 



Personal Injury 



Property Damage 






14000 

12000 

10000 

8000 

6000 

4000 

2000 





1990 



Parking Violations 





12049 








9699 1010 ° 


1TTZ3 


















































1991 



1992 



1993 



Parking Tickets Iss. 



] 



1994 



35 



Andover Police Department 

Arrests 



800 



600 - 



400 - 



200 - 




549 



576 




504 





509 




1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 



Total Arrests 



Incidents by Day of Week 



Tuesday 
15% 



Wednesday 
15% 



Thursday 
15% 




Friday 
15% 



Monday 
15% 



Sunday 
11% 



Saturday 
14% 



Hour of Day 



2000 



1500 



1000 - 



500 




1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 



Total Incidents 



36 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

Animal Control saw a increase in dog complaints and loose dogs 
in 1994. This is attributed in part to an increased public 
awareness of the potential hazard of the rabies problem in the 
area. The n umb er of citations issued for by-law violations 
increased as well. 

The Animal Control Officer attended several seminars on rabies 
sponsored by the State. He spoke to various groups on animal 
safety and rabies awareness including several local schools, The 
Andona Society's Safety Awareness Program and any interested 
residents. 

1993 1994 



Number of citations issued 


54 


23 


43 


Fines/fees collected 


$2,433 


$2,374 


$2,524 


Dog Complaints 


531 


491 


642 


Impounded Dogs 


115 


108 


107 


Lost Dogs 


84 


65 


49 


Dogs Found 


52 


56 


34 


Impounded Cats 


58 


24 


30 


Numbers of calls answered 


1,935 


2,312 


1,962 


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 









The Director attended the regularly scheduled meetings 
sponsored by the State. Updates were done on the Comprehension 
Emergency Management Plan which addresses how to better coordinate 
emergency responses from all Town departments. 

The Radio Group held its weekly meetings and assisted the Town 
at many functions throughout the year. This is a very dedicated 
group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their 
services. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular police officers many 
times throughout the year at several activities totalling 
approximately 500 volunteer hours. 



37 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to proudly 
protect lives and property by providing prompt, skillful, cost- 
effective fire protection and life safety services to the residents 
of Andover. 

To achieve its mission, the department strives to prevent loss 
to property from fire or fire related activities through 
inspections, training and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss 
of life through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical 
services using both fire and ambulance vehicles. The department 
provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area 
citizens annually in all schools and whenever requested by private 
organizations, industries and businesses. 

1993 

Total Incidents: 
Fires 
Rescues 

Miscellaneous Alarms 
Accidental Alarms 
Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 
False Alarms 

Ambulance Emergency Calls 
Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 
Fire Prevention Activities 
Violations 

Permits /Licenses Issued: 
Smoke Detectors 
Report Copies 
Blasting Permits 
Cutting/Welding Permits 
Dumpster Permits 
Fireworks Display Permits 
Gunpowder Storage Permits 
Liquid Gas Storage Permits 
Flamm. Liquid Storage Permits 
Miscellaneous Permits 
Open Air Burning Permit 
Oil Burner Install Permits 
Reinspection Fees 
Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 
Special Suppression System Permits 
Sprinkler Install Permits 
Tentage Permits 

Underground Tank Recertification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install Permits 
Master Fire Alarm Box Tests 

Facilities Apparatus /Eau ipment 

Central Station 2 ambulances; 1 ladder truck; 2 

North Main Street pumpers; 1 boat, 4 sedans 

West Station 1 pumper; 1 fire alarm truck; 1 boat; 

Greenwood & Chandler Rds. 1 reserve pumper 

Ballardvale Station 1 pumper; 1 boat 

Clark & Andover Sts. 



38 



5443 


5451 


386 


248 


13 


23 


48 


70 


598 


638 


41 


35 


123 


130 


2006 


2044 


125 


224 


2086 


2140 


17 


26 


658 


790 


64 


64 


23 


13 


23 


20 


18 


122 


1 


1 


2 





28 


46 


2 


3 


2 


9 


446 


493 


176 


181 


36 


41 


13 


13 


3 





21 


26 


9 


5 


5 


9 


130 


109 


4 





119 


118 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to 
continuously improve our quality of life by providing the finest 
potable water, state of the art disposal of our wastes (water and 
solids), and provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division provided field surveys, construction 
plans and documents, competitive bids, field layouts and 
construction supervision for various construction projects such as 
new sidewalks, storm drains, sewer and water mains. Staff members 
assisted and coordinated with consultants on the construction of 
such projects as the Central Street and Stevens Street bridge 
replacements and the new Bancroft Pumping Station. Assistance was 
also given to the Highway Division in the planning, estimating and 
reconstruction or resurfacing of 57 town streets. The Engineering 
Division maintained and provided records about existing utilities, 
residential and industrial sites, street layouts and excavations. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans were reviewed for 
the Planning Board. The construction of all new roads and 
utilities were inspected and tested to meet Town standard 
requirements. Federal and State government agencies were consulted 
on engineering matters, principally concerning Chapter 90 
construction, sewer main extensions and State Highway projects. The 
Engineering Division updated the Town Assessor's maps and printed 
the necessary copies for other Town Departments. Street opening 
permits for the installation and repair of underground utilities 
were issued through this division and the necessary inspections 
were carried out. 

1993 1994 

Sidewalk Construction (ft.): 13,000 

Storm Drain Construction (ft.): 2,200 3,913 

Water Main Construction (ft.): 1,375 6,100 

Streets Reconstructed/Resurfaced (miles): 19.3 5.9 

Street Opening Permits: 

Issued/ Inspected 211 193 

Sewer Connections reviewed for 

Board of Health: 41 43 

Assessor's Maps Updated: 62 102 

Subdivision Plans reviewed: 

no. of plans/no. of lots 13/113 16/168 

Performance Bonds figured for Planning Brd. : 14 15 

Subdivision Inspections: 

Water Mains (ft.) 20,400 10,780 

Sewer Mains (ft.) 800 3,310 

Drain Lines (ft.) 6,430 8,860 

Roads Paved: 

Binder Coarse (ft.) 10,030 8,750 

Top Coarse (ft.) 6,100 8,500 



39 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for the road maintenance, 
including rebuilding and resurfacing, of 250+ miles of existing 
roads. During the spring and summer, two sweepers were kept busy 
in continuous cleaning of all streets after the winter sanding. 
The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division in its 
inspection of the conditions of new streets before they are 
accepted as public ways as well as providing men and equipment for 
all other Public Works divisions when needed. Catch basins and 
storm drains are kept clean and free of all debris as are Town 
brooks. The Highway Division, with the help and cooperation of all 
other divisions of the Public Works Department and the Department 
of Municipal Maintenance, is also responsible for snow removal and 
ice control, including flood control for all Town roads. 



1992 1993 1994 



Number of streets resurfaced: 
Total no. of miles resurfaced: 
Catch basins cleaned: 
Storm drains cleaned: 
Catch basins repaired: 
Storm drains repaired: 



SOLID WASTE 



13 


50 


17 


3 


22.08 


5.9 


1,819 


1,119 


676 


7 


3 


10 


35 


36 


72 


2 


1 


4 



Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste 
Committee (NESWC) , has its refuse transported and processed at the 
Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover, where the refuse 
is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division 
oversees the mandatory curbs ide recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines, metal containers and glass and the voluntary 
drop-off program collecting #1 and #2 plastics and aluminum 
materials. The Town also maintains a leaf and grass clippings 
compost site on High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, with the compost 
material being available to Town residents. 

1992 1993 1994 

Residential refuse collected: 10,388* 10,027* 10,108* 

Newspapers/magazines recycled: 2,186* 2,278* 2,328* 

Tons of glass recycled: 705* 774* 745* 

Yard waste composted: 844* 1,200* 1,215* 

* Tons 



40 



WATER 

The Water Division is responsible for the meter reading, supply, 
treatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The 
major components of the water system are as follows: 

Supply - Haggetts Pond, Fish Brook, Merrimack River, Abbot 
Well; Treatment - 24 MGD Water Treatment Plant; Chlorination 
Facilities - Fish Brook; Pumping Stations - Water Treatment Plant, 
Fish Brook, Bancroft Reservoir, Prospect Hill and Wood Hill. The 
Water Treatment Plant is a state of the art facility featuring 
ozonation, coagulation and sedimentation, and granular activated 
carbon (GAC) filtration in its treatment processes. 

Distribution Mains — 185 miles and 9,404 connections. 

1992 1993 1994 

Hydrants Repaired: 

Hydrants Replaced: 

Hydrants Flushed: 

Water Main Breaks Repaired: 

House Service Leaks Repaired: 

House Services Renewed: 

Water Main Taps: 

New Water Meters Installed: 

Old Water Meters Replaced: 

Water Meters Repaired: 

Water Shut Offs/Turn Ons: 

Gate Boxes Adjusted: 

Gallons of water pumped to the system 

(in millions) : 
Average daily gallons pumped 

(in millions) : 
Maximum day (in millions) : 

SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and 
maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale Street in 
Ballardvale, Bridle Path, West Elementary School, Shawsheen 
Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes 69 miles of sanitary sewers and 
4,843 connections. 

The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village Pumping 
Station is collected and transported by means of a force main 
through the City of Lawrence and treated by the Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District's regional wastewater treatment plant. 



43 




39 




54 


8 









8 


29 




38 




24 


14 




19 




32 


14 




11 




8 


6 




22 




6 


1 




9 




8 


42 




62 




47 


85 




93 




111 


4 




1 




9 


189 




192 




171 


30 




24 




34 


1,789 


1, 


F 611 


1, 


,750 


4.902 


4, 


,414 


4, 


.794 


10.85 


10. 


.621 


11, 


.561 



41 



Sewer Main Blocks Cleared: 
Sever Main Rodded - Maintenance: 
Sewer Mains Repaired: 
Sewer Services Cleared: 



1992 

36 

13 



34 



1993 

46 

23 



30 



1994 

50 

11 



14 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment 
Facility continued to provide service to residential, commercial 
and industrial users in 1994. Since its initial operation in April 
1977, the facility has treated 189 billion gallons of wastewater 
that was previously discharged, untreated, into the Merrimack 
River. 

The plant is currently staffed by 52 people. The operation is 
continuous 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The District 
Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 



Andover's daily average 

flow to the Sanitary District 

(in millions of gallons) : 



1992 



3.308 



1993 



1994 



3.378 3.455 



ANDOVER RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

The Andover Recycling Committee continued to provide 
volunteers from the community to assist with the Town's monthly 
collection of #1 and #2 plastics and aluminum. This collection is 
held at the West Middle School's parking lot from 9:00 A.M. until 
1:00 P.M. on the third Saturday of each month. 

Members of the committee also collected button batteries from 
various retail stores downtown for shipment by Dana Duxbury and 
Associates to the recycling facility, Mercury Refining Company, 
Inc. (MERECO) in Albany, New York. Fifty-five pounds of mixed 
button batteries were collected in 1994 - compared to almost forty- 
seven pounds in 1993. Many of these batteries contained silver, 
mercury and lithium. 



42 



MUNICIPAL M AINTENANCE 

The mission of the Department of Municipal Maintenance is to 
provide a safe, comfortable and pleasant environment for learning, 
working and living in the Town by the maintenance of all Town and 
School property /buildings, electro-mechanical systems, street 
lighting, traffic lights, grounds and vehicles. 

The Department of Municipal Maintenance provides services to 
all departments requesting repair or new work to their facilities, 
grounds or vehicles. The department also provides services to the 
general public for street lighting, traffic lights, rubbish pickup, 
athletic fields, fencing, leaf composting, Christmas tree pickup, 
tree work, and custodial services for events. The department is 
charged with keeping Andover facilities, vehicles and grounds in 
good condition and to improve the facilities through an on-going 
capital improvement program. The Department of Municipal 
Maintenance manages the Spring Grove Cemetery and is actively 
clearing and constructing additional areas for burials. 

The department is required to keep abreast of required 
Federal, State and Town laws, the American Disabilities Act 
regulations, and laws concerning health safety, pesticide 
application, underground fuel tanks, radon, air quality, asbestos, 
lead paint and hazardous waste disposal. 

The Director of Municipal Maintenance Department has 
supervision of three Superintendents, the Facilities Coordinator, 
Administrative Secretary, Account Clerk, Computer Operator, two 
part-time Receptionist/Switchboard Operators and one part-time 
Clerical Assistant. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The following are some of the highlights which the Building 
Maintenance Division completed during 1994: 

Wood Park Fence - a considerable amount of time and manpower 
were put into refurbishing the fence. Stone piers were 
rebuilt by the Town mason and Town employees. The "Our Town" 
employees did all of the painting of the wooden part of the 
fence. They also assisted in moving and placing stones for 
the mason. 

Town Offices - in cooperation with the Andover Historical 
Society, the Ford's Coffee Shop mural was cleaned, stretched, 
framed and hung in the main floor corridor. 

Shawsheen School - twelve new replacement windows were 
installed. Most of the third floor as well as the Main 
Office, Media Center and a classroom were recarpeted. A wall 
was removed in the old cafeteria to make a large room for the 
Kids' Club. 



43 



Bancroft School - carpet on the entire first floor including 
the Media Center and hallway in front of the Main Office was 
replaced. The skylight in the cafeteria was replaced. 
Structural repairs were completed as a result of the 
structural study. 

Ballardvale Fire Station - twelve replacement windows were 
installed on the apparatus deck. 

Ballardvale Playground - a considerable amount of new 
playground equipment was installed. A new roof was put on the 
storage shed and new doors were installed. 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION 

The Municipal Buildings Division is responsible for the 
scheduling and renting of school facilities, after-school hours, 
school and town playing fields, Recreation Park, and the Old Town 
Hall function room in the Andover Town House. 

Schools 

Rentals remained constant in 1994. Gymnasium rentals 
comprised the majority of the 5,189 rental/uses in 1994 by 
school/municipal personnel and groups, scouting organization, youth 
leagues, community performing arts groups and private individuals. 

1992 1993 1994 

Permits Issued: 650 695 5,189* 

School/Municipal: 60% 61% 51% 

Scout Groups/Youth Leagues: 18% 17% 18% 

Private Individuals: 22% 22% 31% 



School /Town Fields 

School and Town playing fields continued to be rented to 
capacity from the beginning of April through the middle of 
November. Adult athletic and youth leagues, such as Little League, 
Andover Youth Baseball, Andover Soccer Association, Girls Softball 
and Junior Football, comprised the majority of the field uses in 
1994. 

1992 1993 1994 

Permits Issued: 2,800 2,850 2,922 

Youth Leagues: 93% 94% 86% 

Adult Groups: 7% 6% 9% 

Private Rentals 5% 



44 



Recreation Park 



In addition to the park field being utilized for Department of 
Community Services for a co-ed softball league, a youth baseball 
camp and adult and youth tennis lessons, Rec Park is also available 
to rent for private functions from May to October. Rentals 
decreased from 54 events the previous season to 47 in 1994, 
however, park rentals by private residents and local groups 
increased from the previous year. 



1992 



1993 



19?4 



Permits Issued: 
Residents : 
Non-Res idents : 



52 
54% 
46% 



54 
56% 
44% 



47 
70% 
30% 



Old Town Hall 

The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available 
to municipal/school groups, residents and non-residents, to rent 
for parties and special events since February, 1990. Although the 
total number of rentals/uses was less than the previous year, the 
percentage of school and municipal events hosted at the Old Town 
Hall tripled in 1994. 



1992 



1??3 



1994 



Rental Agreements: 
Residents: 
Non-Residents : 
School/Municipal : 



83 
78% 
13% 

9% 



85 
77% 
13% 
10% 



73 
60% 
10% 
30% 



The goal of the Municipal Buildings Division is to continue to 
promote positive community relations with school/town departments, 
community organizations and the general public. 




FY "93 FV94 

Recreation Park 



FY "93 



FY*94 



Old Town Hall 
Function Room 



45 



PARKS AND GROUNDS DIVISION 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, 
Cemetery and Forestry) are independent and interdependent. They 
all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They 
share certain pieces of equipment and work together on special 
projects. As with any public agency with manpower, special 
equipment, and vehicles in its inventory, the three divisions 
perform many tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal 
horticultural maintenance duties such as delivering surplus 
government food to the Senior Center, litter control, trash 
removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, fence/gate/backstop 
repairs, drainage connections, ice control, snow removal, and 
moving extraordinarily heavy objects such as the whiskey barrels 
used as planters in the downtown area. 

Parks 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields 
and 1.4 million square feet of lawn areas. Ballfields are located 
on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, 
Ballardvale Playground, upper Shawsheen, lower Shawsheen, the 
Bowling Green, and the Deyermond Field. Lawn areas are the grounds 
of all Town and School buildings, parks, playgrounds, and 
designated islands, triangles, and other parcels throughout the 
Town. Ballfields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all 
secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of 
mowing, aerating, watering, overseeding, liming, fertilizing and 
controlling weeds and insects. Pesticide operations are conducted 
by trained and licensed personnel using approved pesticides and 
methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs and 
shrub beds on Town property and cuts back brush encroaching upon 
ballfields and recreation areas. 

Cemetery 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by 
the Town of Andover. The cemetery contains approximately sixty 
acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1994, there were 
84 burials and 93 grave sites were sold. $63,825 in fees were 
collected - $41,165 was turned over to the Town Treasurer and 
$22,660 was added to the principal of the Perpetual Care Fund. 
Cemetery operations and maintenance consist of burials, mowing, 
trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf 
pickup, snow removal, care of its own facilities and equipment, and 
out-of -cemetery tasks such as trash in Recreation Park, drainage 
work and construction. During 1994, the cemetery crew planted 
ornamental sourwood and weeping Katsura trees purchased with funds 
from the estate of Sidney P. White. 

A three-year comparison of burials, sales, and monies 
collected is as follows: 



46 



1992 1993 1994 

Burials 83 96 84 

Grave Sites Sold 81 120 93 

Total Monies Collected $58,935 $74,145 $63,825 

Forestry 

Forestry is responsible for the maintenance of trees along the 
roadside, on school property, and other Town-owned land. During 
1994, 111 dead and dying large trees were removed. The Forestry 
Division planted 63 shade trees along the roadside and planted 55 
yews at the West Middle School. Tree varieties planted were: 
Callery Pear, White Pine, London Planetree and Shademaster 
Honeylocust. Approximately 25% of the personnel's time was spent 
on pruning which consists of street-by-street pruning, storm 
repairs, flatclearing areas of undesirable vegetation, and removing 
obstructions at intersections and curves thus providing better 
visibility. The Forestry Division also mowed tall weeds along the 
roadside throughout the Town. 

A three-year comparison of removals and planting is as 
follows: 

1992 1993 1994 

Trees Removed 107 133 111 

Trees Planted 38 30 63 

PLUMBING/HEATING/ELECTRICAL DIVISION 

The following are the major accomplishments during 1994: 

West Middle School - twelve water coolers were replaced in the 
school corridors, new lighting was installed in the cafeteria, 
a 20,000 gallon oil tank was removed, magnetic door closers 
were installed on all classroom doors, a new return line 
system and pumps were installed and the #1 boiler was 
regasketed. 

West Elementary School - approximately 150 diffusers for 
lighting fixtures were replaced. 

Bancroft School - replaced approximately 300 diffusers for 
lighting fixtures, installed new corridor lighting with 
fluorescent fixtures. 

Shawsheen School - magnetic door closers were installed, new 
lighting was installed on the ground floor, fire alarm pull- 
stations were added to all stairways and new energy management 
for boilers was installed. 

Town Offices - a new generator was installed and a new room 
was built for the generator. 



47 



Safety Center - a new generator was installed and the 
electricians assisted in the installation of the E-911 
emergency telephone system. 



SHED - all maintenance of the building became 
responsibility of the Municipal Maintenance Department. 



the 



VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

In 1994 the division purchased five new police vehicles and 
one four-wheel drive vehicle for the Police Department, two new 
dump trucks and three new stainless steel V spreaders for the 
Highway Division of the Department of Public Works and a new truck 
for the department's Water Division. A gang lawnmower and a new 
tractor were purchased for the Parks and Grounds Division of the 
Department of Municipal Maintenance. 

The following statistics indicate the gallons of gasoline and 
diesel fuel used by the Town departments: 



Police Dept. 
Fire Dept. 

DPW 

DMM 



Gasoline 

Gasoline 
Diesel 

Gasoline 
Diesel 

Gasoline 
Diesel 



Collaborative Diesel 

Council on Aging Gasoline 

Library Gasoline 

Town Manager Gasoline 



1992 

46,668 

4,456 
5,989 

7,602 
10,888 

21,961 
2,233 

4,368 
736 

2,622 
554 



1993 

39,109 

4,156 
7,582 

15,576 
16,055 

22,011 
3,665 

4,970 
596 

1,873 
458 



1994 

35,917 

3,762 
5,987 

14,475 
13,978 

19,233 
3,041 

6,288 
583 

2,012 
405 



A partition wall has been installed to separate the 
maintenance area where the mechanics work from an adjacent storage 
section. This separation will reduce heat loss and provide a 
better working space for the employees. 



48 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 
BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, 
safety and welfare of the Town's residents and visitors through the 
enforcement of the State and local laws, bylaws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the 
State Building 780 CMR of the Acts of 1972 and Zoning Act, 
Massachusetts General Laws 40A. The Building Division issues 
permits for all types of construction including, but not limited 
to, school buildings (both public and private) , institutional 
buildings (nursing homes) , business, commercial and industrial 
buildings, dormitories, multi-family as well as single family 
dwellings, pools, chimneys, signs and additions and alterations to 
all structures. Building officials also perform periodic 
inspections for those buildings which are required to obtain 
Certificates of Inspection under State Building Code, Table 108. 

In addition to scheduled inspections and meetings with 
internal and external customers, the Building Division was 
represented at 4 State Building Code Appeals Board Hearings, 37 
Interdepartmental Reviews and held 31 Plan Reviews. 



1993 

Single Family Dwellings 

No. of permits (inc. foundations) 97 
Estimated value $17,824,394 

Fees $ 135,074 

* Includes water connection fees 



1994 



92 
$16,659,876 
$ 181,390* 



New Multi-Family 
No. of permits 
Estimated value 
Fees 

New Commercial Construction 
No. of permits 
Estimated value 
Fees 

Additions & Alternations to 
All Types of Buildings 
No. of permits 
Estimated value 
Fees 

Public Buildings/Schools 
No. of permits 
Estimated value 
Fees 



$24,864,734 
$ 128,424 



643 
$16,426,153 
$ 111,024 



39 



$ 1,227,500 
$ 13,833 



$ 
$ 



816,000 
6,173 



776 
$32,099,045 
$ 209,995 



39 12 

$ 5,904,598 $ 7,413,000 
$ 24,892 $ 12,043 



49 



1993 



1994 



Pools. Chimneys. Raze. Signs 
No. of permits 
Estimated value 
Fees 

Certificates of Inspection 
Fees 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Fees 



413 

$646,051 

$ 9,875 



$956 



$1,545 



272 
$515,054 
$ 7,295 



$870 



$2,345 



3,160 
$58,730,475 
$ 546,240** 



Total Building. Electrical. 

Plumbing and Gas Permits 

Number of permits 3,326 

Estimated value $65,665,930 

Fees $411,790 

** Includes water connection fees 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the 
practical safeguarding of persons and property from hazards arising 
from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for receiving and granting permits and scheduling 
inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all residential, 
commercial and industrial jobs, approving electrical plans for new 
buildings, assisting the Fire Department in inspections of fires 
due to faulty electrical devices and seeing that permits are issued 
for repairs due to fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, 
conducting and certifying inspections of schools, public buildings, 
day care centers and nursing homes in conjunction with the building 
officials are part of the duties of the Electrical Inspector. 
Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the 
cooperation of Massachusetts Electric Company and corrected without 
incident. 



Permits issued 
Fees collected 



1992 

885 
$43,239 



PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING INSPECTIONS 



1993 

1214 
$46,857 



1994 

1015 
$70,499 



All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled 
through enforcement of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts State 
Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code formulated by the Board of State 
Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under authority of Chapter 
142 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



50 



Plumbing Permits issued 
Fees collected 
Gas Permits issued 
Fees collected 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 


527 
$29,343 

402 
$11,636 



This office issues permits for installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are 
conducted as necessary to ensure compliance with State codes. A 
final inspection is conducted for the purpose of issuance of a 
Certificate of Occupancy. Complaints and violations must also be 
investigated and corrected or reported to the proper authorities. 

1992 1993 1994 

511 501 

$28,170 $29,838 

407 436 

$11,497 $11,959 



The mission of the Conservation Division is to protect 
Andover's natural resources and to act as trustees in perpetuity of 
the Town's conservation land. 

During 1994, the Conservation Commission issued approximately 
2% fewer permits under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act 
than the preceding year. As required by law, an advertised Public 
Hearing is conducted for each permit issued. These projects 
include commercial/ industrial, residential subdivisions, single lot 
development and municipal and State projects. 

The Conservation Commission maintains the on-going delineation 
of wetland resources depicted on the 183 Andover Wetland Maps which 
are directly referenced in various Town By-Laws and regulations, 
including the Zoning By-Law, the Watershed Protection Overlay 
District, and Rules and Regulations for Use of Subsurface Sewage 
Disposal Systems. Approximately 1,600 acres of Town-owned land are 
under the control and custody of the Conservation Commission which 
prepared and periodically revises Andover's Open Space and Outdoor 
Recreation Plan. The Commission administers a number of statutory 
Conservation Restrictions and Conservation Easements over privately 
owned property. Approval of Article 61 at the 1993 Annual Town 
Meeting made $1,000,000 available for the acquisition of 
conservation land. 

The Conservation staff attends interdepartmental reviews of 
major projects, interacts with the other Town land-use regulatory 
agencies, including the Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board, 
Board of Health, Building officials and their respective staff 
members and provides technical and administrative support to the 
seven-member volunteer Commission. 



51 



CONSERVATION DIVISION SUMMARY (JANUARY 1 THROUGH DECEMBER 31) 





1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


Conservation Commiuion Meetings 


22 


23 


24 


24 


22 


Public Hearing! & Public Meetings 


90 


95 


185 


147 


164 


Orden of Condition Issued 


22 


18 


20 


25 


21 


Amended Orders of Condition Issued 


8 


2 


9 


22 


9 


Certificates of Compliance Issued 


48 


47 


59 


54 


50 


Determinations of Applicability Issued 


60 


46 


102 


60 


62 


Findings of Significance Issued 


3 


18 


22 


31 


23 


Enforcement Orders Issued 


8 


24 


14 


11 


14 


Emergency Certifications Issued 


2 


3 


4 





3 


Wetland Map Boundary Amendments 


10 


8 


10 


22 


24 


Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 


58.3 


163 


36.2 


1 


10.65 


Conservation Restrictions Established 

















Wetland Filing Fees Collected 


$12,907 


$5,355 


$5^52 


$9,805 


$6,922 


Professional Staff 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Expenditures from Conservation Fund 
(by Fiscal Year) 


$529,507 


$285,000 


$922 


$500 


$264,701 



HEALTH PIYISTQN 

The mission of the Health Division is to promote and protect 
the public health including the physical, mental, emotional and 
social wellness of all people. 

The Andover Board of Health is the Town's health policy and 
decision-making board. Administrative staff includes the Director 
of Public Health, two Sanitary Code Inspectors/Health officers and 
two part-time Public Health nurses. John R. Kruse retired from the 
Board of Health after serving ten years. The following are 
highlights of the Board of Health activities in 1994: 

proposed and implemented first ever local by-law restricting 
smoking in municipal buildings, food service facilities, and 
other public locations. 

secured $145,000 grant from the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health to form a regional consortium with North 
Andover, Methuen, Middleton and Dracut to address health 
hazards and public health impacts of smoking and tobacco use. 



52 



instituted new glucose screening program for senior citizens 
to raise awareness of diabetes in elderly with a grant from 
the Andover Home for Aged. 

established town-wide rabies education and control policy to 
address rabies epidemic in raccoons. 

modified pre-school immunization action plan to target 
unimmunized newborns to six year olds. 

attained laboratory certification for cholesterol screening 
program from federal health care financing administration. 



ACTIVITIES REPORT 



199? 



1994 



Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Restaurant Inspections 
Complaints & Investigations 
Administrative Hearings 
Court Actions 
Fees collected 



12 


11 


13 


182 


143 


165 


304 


270 


226 


246 


225 


257 


5 


2 


1 


8 


5 


2 



$72,602 $57,183 $65,278 



Disease prevention, detection, containment and treatment are 
important public health nursing objectives. Health education is an 
important part of reaching these objectives. There have were 6 
cases of human rabies exposure reported in 1994. The Public Health 
Nurses followed up on every reported case of human rabies exposure. 
All six were informed of the danger and went to see their 
physicians who offered or administered the rabies vaccine. There 
were no cases of human rabies in Andover in 1994. 

Human exposure to rabies involved mostly domestic animals 
coming in contact with wild animals and then humans handling their 
animals. A few cases involves rabid animal bites. In order for an 
animal to be protected against rabies, they must have a booster 
immunization one to twelve months after one rabies vaccination. 

State law requires owners to immunize their cats and dogs 
against rabies. Dog owners in Andover must show proof of current 
rabies vaccination in order to obtain a dog license. 

The Public Health Nurses provided free tuberculin testing for 
Andover residents who require it for employment or are exposed to 
active tuberculosis. There is extensive follow-up of any positive 
reactor on medication or active cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. 

All communicable diseases are investigated and a case report 
sent to the Communicable Disease Control Division of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 



53 



Rubella Prevention Immunization Clinic 

An employee of an Andover industry had rubella (German 
Measles) . This is a serious problem in contracted by a pregnant 
woman. The rubella virus can cause blindness, heart defects, 
mental retardation and death in babies infected before birth. 

The industry's physician and two nurses, the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health Immunization Nurse and the Andover 
Health Department staff held a meeting to inform the supervisors of 
the facility details of the disease. The need to identify those 
who had not had the disease and those who were not immunized was 
also addressed. The Andover Health Department conducted an 
immunization clinic was held at the industry. Thirty females and 
nineteen males received combined measles, mumps and rubella 
vaccine. No other cases of rubella were reported to the industry. 

CLINIC REPORT 

1992 1993 1994 

Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 

Office Visits 

Home Visits 

Influenza Immun. Clinic Attendance 

Pneumonia Immunization Clinic 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 
Attendance 

Glucose Screening Clinic (new) 31 31 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 

1992 1993 1?94 

Chicken Pox 167 135 190 

Animal Bites 19 37 46 

Campylobacter 8 9 10 

Salmonella 6 7 10 

Giardia 3 2 1 

Hepatitis 6 7 

Lyme Disease 3 

Meningitis 3 



35 


35 


36 


455 


489 


457 


51 


49 


49 


755 


796 


761 


253 


188 


116 


6 


17 


13 


1,088 


1,326 


1,088 


53 


75 


61 


10 


11 


10 


153 


182 


153 



54 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES ■ TOBACCO AWARENESS PROGRAM 

Increased publicity on second-hand smoke in 1993 prompted 
citizens to complain to Andover's Board of Health and Board of 
Selectmen about inadequate separation of smokers and non-smokers in 
restaurants and Town offices. At the same time, the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health began funding grants for local tobacco 
education programs with the 25 cent excise tax on cigarettes 
resulting from the passage of ballot Question #1 in November, 1992. 
Andover, Methuen, Middleton and North Andover applied together and 
received a grant in late 1993. They were later joined by Dracut. 

Andover, the lead agency, provided office space in Old Town 
Hall. Program Director Pamela Ross-Kung began work in February, 
joined by Assistant Director Patricia Crafts in March and Maria 
Prisco, Secretary, in September. 

The Tobacco Awareness Program offers free technical assistance 
for worksite programs limiting smoking. It helps smokers quit and 
sponsors public education to keep non-smokers from starting. It 
helps draft Town tobacco regulations and conducts compliance 
surveys of vendors selling tobacco to minors, since 80% of smokers 
begin by age 18. It surveys tobacco use (smoking and chewing) 
among students and their families. For more information, please 
call 470-2432. 

Since tobacco smoke contains 43 cancer-causing chemicals, the 
Board of Health is responsible for protecting non-smokers from 
involuntary inhalation. The Andover Town Meeting adopted a non- 
smoking bylaw on April 13, 1994 - the first of the consortium towns 
to do so. The bylaw prohibits smoking in enclosed indoor areas 
open to the public, such as restaurants, elevators, public 
restrooms, child care facilities, educational and health 
facilities, nursing homes, hotel and motel lobbies, libraries, 
museums, food markets, indoor sports arenas, auditoriums, public 
transportation and prohibits most cigarette vending machines. The 
bylaw went into effect on July 13, 1994. 

Outreach - Tobacco Control Staff, the Board of Health and 
volunteers : 

held public hearings and distributed leaflets on Andover's 
smoking bylaw in March and April prior to Town Meeting. 

worked to equalize smoking regulations throughout the region. 

met with Andover PTOs. 

staged a continuing education event for area pharmacists. 

sponsored booths at Earth Day, Bazaar Days and "Know Your 
Town" in Andover and at 19 health fairs/Town events in the 
region. 



55 



printed "Thank You For Not Smoking" signs and created 
brochures for stores and restaurants explaining Andover bylaw. 

recruited and trained 14 - 16 year-old volunteers to check 84 
vendors in three towns for compliance with State law which 
forbids selling to minors under 18 years of age. Of 84 
vendors, 55 sold or showed intent to sell to minors. The 
volunteers were able to purchase cigarettes from 77% of 
vending machines. 

wrote publicity materials for pregnant women on tobacco use 
and SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) . 

created public service radio announcements. 

offered no-cost smoking cessation programs for Town employees. 

co-sponsored a Great American Smokeout celebration at U. Mass. 
Lowell for 800 eighth graders from 19 towns. 

distributed confidential tobacco use questionnaires to more 
than 3,200 students in Methuen, with a return of 2,182. 
Distributed questionnaires to grades 5-12 in Andover in 
December. 

coordinated a video, "Creating a Healthy Environment", which 
aired in three states on cable television. 

surveyed 2,600 worksites for their smoking policies in four 
communities . 

met with boards and officials in 5 towns on tobacco policies. 

1994 Income from State Grant: $130,674.04 

1994 Expenses: 

Salaries and benefits $ 80,689.37 

Travel 1,377.87 

Computers, fax, copier, 

audiovisual equipment 16,926.34 

Postage 1,335.53 

Office Supplies 5,550.32 

Office Furniture 1,112.01 

Promotional Information 3,809.17 

Program Support 4,786.35 

Prizes/ certificates 573.00 

Advertising 2 , 560 . 94 

Video Production 481.95 

Dues/ subscriptions 558 . 65 

Brochures 3,862.00 

Telephone 2,618.00 

Telephone/ fax installation 1,476.10 

Conference Education 707.50 

Educational Theatre Company 1.800.00 

TOTAL $130,225.13 



56 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly 
growth and development of the Town through sound planning practices 
and through the implementation of the recommendations of the Master 
Plan. 

The year 1994 marked the busiest period for the Planning 
Division in nearly a decade. Activity levels confirmed the 1993 
prediction of an economic upswing. By yearns end we saw a thriving 
downtown and continued expansion of our industries. The Planning 
Division saw a 300% increase in subdivision plans (26 plans process 
with 18 receiving approval) and a 78% increase in special permits 
over the previous year, all of which resulted in a 114% increase in 
revenues generated by the division. 

The year saw the commencement of the first comprehensive 
overhaul of the Town's zoning bylaws in more than thirty years. In 
1994, major progress was made on the River Road corridor 
improvements, and the Town was awarded a $1,000,000 grant from the 
State for roadway improvements in the Lowell Junction industrial 
area. The Planning Division continues to play a significant role 
in those projects. Major redevelopment plans approved in 1994 
included 129 residential units in the Stevens Mill complex and the 
Planning staff commenced review of the expansion of the Suburban 
Health Center adjacent to that site. Reviews also commenced on 
redevelopment of Dundee Park by Pentucket Medical Associates. 

As we enter 1995, the Planning staff and the members of the 
Planning Board continue to work to make certain that the growth 
Andover experiences is positive and beneficial to all citizens. 





1990 


1991 


1992 


1993 


1994 


Planning Board Meetings 


23 


23 


25 


21 


23 


Definitive Subdivision Plans 


6 


3 


7 


6 


10 


Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


3 


1 


3 


2 


8 


Approved ANR Plans* 


37 


27 


38 


39 


28 


Site Plan Reviews 


9 


1 


4 


6 


4 


Special Permits Issued 


6 


6 


13 


14 


25 


Subdivision Performance Guarantees 


$287,045 


$288,410 


$426,940 


$422,536 


$459,349 


Warrant Articles Reported 


49 


24 


22 


28 


25 


Street Acceptances 


11 


4 


8 


7 


5 


Revenues Generated 


$12^46 


$53,828 


$34,514 


$19,265 


$41,149 



•Subdivision plans not requiring formal Planning Board approval 



57 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function 
under the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Chapter 40A and 4 OB and the Town By-laws. The Board meets on the 
first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library, Memorial 
Hall, Elm Square. Five regular members and four associate members 
are appointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public 
hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the 
following areas: 

For a variance from the requirements of the By-laws. 

For a special permit under the By-laws. 

By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building 

Inspector or other administrative officer. 

For permission to construct low or moderate income 

housing within the Town of Andover (Comprehensive 

Permit) . 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent 
plans and sketches requested, legal advertisements are published 
and abutters are notified as required by law. The public hearings 
are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of 
Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearings, the members 
of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each property in question 
and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter, open to the public, at 
which time the Board discusses the petitions which have been heard. 
Based on their views and the evidence presented at the hearing, a 
decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk. 

1991 1992 1993 1994 

Regular Monthly Meetings 12 12 12 12 

Deliberation Meetings 19 15 15 13 

Petitions Heard 45 77 86 73 

Petitions Granted 36 69 69 62 

Petitions Denied 7 9 8 10 



The Community Development & Planning Departments revolving 
account is used for the departmental fees charged for advertising 
of legal hearings and/or legal notices associated with permit 
applications within the department. Receipts for FY94 were 
$10,544.03 - expenditures were $7,990.79. 



58 



£ 



3 



o 

o 

o 

GQ 

w 

z 



o 



CO 

O 

z 



K 
O 

u 



1 "8 
































2 i. 

■o .5 


§ 












U 






§ 








tf 




.c <- -=: 




























fM 




ir ° o 
£ U 


"■* 












"" 






"■* 






<r> 


^r 




n 
BO 




























tf 




o .5 




























^ 




as T 
























— ( 


—I 


— " 




£ CD 
































































"3 
































e 
































o 




























^ 




•a 
































3 S* 
































3 "O 
































•a w 
































■a 
































JC 
































































































.a 
































2 -3 




























# 




8 a 

E 3 o 


— * 


— 


*-H 


^ 


CS 


CS 


— < 


_) 


,* 


r> 




CS 


ON 


© 
>© 

CS 




o "2 
































O £ 






























































M 
































c 
































o 


































tj "3 
11 




























# 


c 
o 




cs 


- 






— H 


^n 








cs 






r* 


no 

Os 


o 

3 
































O 
































1 
































Ui 
































O 


































.2 






























£ 






























t£ 




_. >/i _ 




























^ 


I 


1 &2 

Famil 

Resid 

(a) 


cs 


m 


m 


\o 


r> 


^f 


y> 


v» 


>r% 


CS 




CS 


9\ 




■8 

1 

00 
































u 
































1- 
































V 
































? 






























^ 


^^ 


S 




























t«; 


# 


O 

* ? 






- 


- 


cs 


O 








- 


- 


- 


o 




ae 
































SI 

I 
































X 

* >< 




























Os 


to 


t* 


«r> 


«n 


o 


*■ 


^~ 


\o 


\o 


\o 


NO 


«r> 


■* 






o 


X 






























■"5 

o 

►SI 
































E 
































u 


M 






























j= 


umber 

of 

earing: 




























t^ 


H 


«o 


w> 


■* 


© 


\o 


r» 


>c 


vo 


NO 


r- 


NO 


«n 


P 


8 


*-< 


Z X 






























f^ 
































H 


»94 

eading 
ATE: 


Os 

o\ 

B 


■* 
o\ 

en 

■8 


o\ 

o* 

»— < 

cs 

CS 


OS 
0\ 

k> 

u 

a, 


Os 

<T* 

>> 
03 


o\ 

*■* 
CM 

u 

c 


0\ 
Os 

*-^ 

t-* 


os 

OS 

60 

3 


o\ 

On 

00* 

CO 


ON 

\o" 


ON 
ON 

en 

> 

o 


on 
o\ 

8 


i 

o 


^ 


< 

U 

3 
z 


- E Q 




u- 


2 


< 


2 


3 


3 


< 


O 


Z 


Q 






? 



O 

o 

E 

o 



i3 

c 
u 

o 

"3 
•c 



3 B 



3 
"O 

E £ 
, o 

° "g 

03 



■o 

c 

£8 
to 

C 

o 

■8 



8 

to 

en 

C 

o 
•a 

"i 



E 
E 
o 
U 

x> 

1 






■2* t; 

° 5. 



o 

■5 

no 

3 

Q 

CS 



s 
< 



2 
•o 



"8 



S3 
60 



to 



to 



c 
to 

o 

& 

u 
3 
,0 



59 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The mission of Community Services is to provide the residents 
of Andover a myriad of social, educational, cultural and 
recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility 
for all. Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the 
community and incorporate ideas into valued programs for its 
citizens now and in the future. 

Community Services continues to rate the pulse of the 
community and transfuse their ideas into valued programs. A 
vigorous departmental effort continues to improve service to our 
citizens. Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of 
community-based instructors, streamlined registration including 
Fax, VISA/Mastercard, overnight mail box and increased 
identification with the DCS "blue book" . Winter registrations were 
lower than the previous year due to the extremely cold and snowy 
winter. A spring flyer sent home through elementary schools helped 
fill the offerings by maximizing the class enrollments. 

William Fahey, a Youth Services Coordinator, was hired in 
January through the Tobacco Cessation Grant. He has been working 
with the Andover Youth Council establishing personal growth groups, 
Outward Bound, Teen Corp, Summer Connection and a warrant article 
for Annual Town Meeting proposing a plan to upgrade Recreation 
Park. 

The Revolving Account, expanded in scope to include children's 
programming, offered a new summer theater arts program, school 
vacation science programs and a continuation of the foreign 
language enrichment classes and a summer enrichment program at 
Phillips Academy. Children's Studio for the Arts program was a 
success with 60 participants enrolled into the two week program. 
The Club for All program at Phillips Academy filled to capacity 
with 90 children. Use of this account reflects a decrease in the 
general account. 

Summer camp-type programs are mainstreaming children of all 
ability levels. The Pupil Personnel Department hires staff to 
compliment the DCS staff. Hydro-raking of Pomps Pond was repeated 
this summer. Removal of the weeds continues to improve the quality 
of the beachfront and swimming area. The "Our Town" workers were 
an asset during the summer. The workers completed maintenance and 
beautification projects at Pomps Pond, Recreation Park and 
playgrounds. 

VISA and Mastercard registration use continues to increase. 
Forty percent of the total monies collected for class registrations 
this year came from participants using their credit cards. Class 
and program revenues are as follows: 



60 



1991 1992 199? 1994 

Class participants 3,083 3,754 4,513 3,897 

Class Revenue $105,596 $138,397 $180,744 $148,212 

Programs (camps, trips) $130,227 $131,019 $145,683 $111,600 

Amount of Tax Support $ 57,321 $ 53,274 $ 48,275 $ 82,298 

GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The Annual Report for fiscal year 1994, covering the period 
from July 1, 1993 through June 30, 1994, was accepted and approved 
at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District Committee held on October 
11, 1994. The report is prepared each year in conformity with the 
terms of the Agreement to Establish a Regional School District. 
Participating communities in the district are the City of Lawrence, 
and the Towns of And over, Methuen and North Andover. 





1991-92 
1,448 


1992-93 
1,452 


1993-94 


Enrollment 


1,475 


Andover students 


26 


23 


27 


Placement of graduates/ 


76% 


80% 


78% 


employment 








Business Firms with 


1,831 


1,885 


1,952 


Cooperative Work 








Agreements 









The following courses were offered during the 1993-94 school 



year: 



Allied Health Technician 

Automotive 

Clothing 

Construction & Building/Painting 

Data Processing 

Drafting 

Electronics 

Food Tech Management/Clothing 

Graphics Communications Tech. 

Metal Fabrication 

Small Engine Repair 

Major Applicance/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration 



Autobody 

Carpentry 

Cosmetology 

Culinary Arts 

Distributive Education 

Electrical 

Heavy Equipment 

Industrial Electronics 

Machine Technology 

Plumbing and Pipefitting 



61 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

The mission of the Council on Aging is to ensure 
comprehensive, quality programs and services through outreach, 
education, advocacy and social activities for the senior population 
of the Town of Andover. 

The Andover Council on Aging has experienced changes this past 
year which have had a direct impact on the statistical data for 
this annual report. Due to recent changes in the health care 
structures, we experienced a significant decline in the number of 
participants in our Day Care Program, however, additional classes 
offered to seniors caused an increase in the enrollment figures. 

The Meals-on-Wheels Program has experienced a dramatic 
increase due to the number of frail seniors being released from 
hospitals prematurely as well as the growing number of frail elders 
living at home in the community. In this area, the numbers are 
expected to icnrease. 

Volunteer services continue to increase, especially the 
Volunteer Medical Transportation Program, for the same reason as 
the expansion of the Meals-on-Wheels Program. Overall, volunteers 
have become a vital component of senior services, contributing a 
significant amount to the Town and to the quality of life for the 
senior population. 

Outreach Services continues to experience an on-going demand 
for additional services. Due to the implementation of the 
S.H.I.N.E. Program, a large number of seniors requested and 
received assistance with health insurance issues. Unusual growth 
can be expected in this area in the years to come. 

As the numbers of senior citizens increase, and the frail 
elders continue to be maintained at home, it is expected that the 
need for a variety of services in the coming years will also 
continue to grow. 

1992 1993 1994 



Elderlv Social Dav Care 
Total Participation 
Total Days Used 


61 
4,945 


51 
4,252 


39 
3,007 


Instructional Classes 
Total Classes 
Total Participation 


297 
577 


364 
757 


414 
828 


Lectures and Seminars 
Total Number 
Total Attendance 


23 
575 


24 
600 


25 
630 



62 



1994 



Food Services 








Meals-On-Wheels 


8,789 


7,186 


11,120 


Walk-Ins 


5,128 


5,634 


6,140 


Social Events 








Number of Parties 


6 


10 


14 


Total Attendance 


404 


964 


1,344 


Senior Prom Attendance 


231 


150 


250 


Binao (Weeklv) 








Total Games 


48 


48 


46 


Total Attendance 


4,200 


4,320 


4,140 


Volunteer Medical Transportation 






Total Mileage 






4,900 


Total Hours 






600 


Unduplicated Clients 






58 


Duplicated Clients 






28 


Other Volunteer Services 








Total Hours 


— 


— 


18,624 


In-kind Services 


— — 


— — 


$196,558 


Elderlv Health Clinics: 








Eye Screening (2/yr.) 


65 


70 


80 


Hearing Screening (1/mo.) 


120 


180 


210 


Skin Cancer Screening 


30 


— - 


— — 


Blood Pressure (weekly) 


718 


802 


897 


Flu Shots 


1,088 


1,326 


1,088 


Pneumonia Shots 


53 


75 


61 


Outreach Services 








Council on Aging: 








Unduplicated Clients 


— 


— 


124 


Duplicated Clients 


— 


— 


149 


Home Visits 


— 


— 


90 


Hospital Visits 


— 


— 


67 


Office Visits 


— 


— 


93 


S.H.I.N.E. 


— 


— 


100 


Other 


— 


— 


178 


Elder Services of the 








Merrimack Valley: 








Unduplicated Clients 


249 


272 


282 


Proportionate Cost of 








Services 


$202,816 


$296,275 


$307,169 


Family Service Assoc. 








of Lawrence: 








Total Clients Served 


152 


160 


144 


Unduplicated Clients 


70 


73 


54 


Total Contacts 


325 


393 


446 



63 



ANDOVER HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

The Andover Historical Commission endeavors to fulfill its 
mission to advise the Town concerning the preservation of it 
historic and archeological resources and has been active in the 
following areas: 

Demolition Delay Bvlaw: The Commission heard requests for 
demolition from six petitioners and held public hearings on four 
historically significant structures including Draper Hall, 15 
Stevens Street (Marland Mills) , 71 Main Street (old Post Office) 
and 100 School Street (old Depot building) . In all cases, the 
Commission actively worked with the owners to either find 
alternatives to demolition or promote preservation of the remaining 
structure. In the case of Marland Mills, demolition was ultimately 
avoided as a result of intervention by the National Park Service. 
Historic buildings, however, continue to be lost in those areas 
lying outside the boundaries of the bylaw. Barns and out buildings 
are particularly threatened structures. 

The Commission continues to promote heritage education by co- 
sponsoring the Annual Andover Historical Preservation Awards and 
the historic building marker program with the Andover Historical 
Society. 

This year, the Commission successfully nominated Jane Griswold 
and her "Sunday Drive" column in The Eagle Tribune for a 
Massachusetts State Preservation Award. This award represented a 
unique collaborative effort with other historical commissions and 
organizations in the Merrimack Valley. 

Current preservation projects worthy of recognition in the 
community are the completion of the South Church steeple, the 
restoration and redevelopment of Marland Place as an assisted care 
living center, restoration and reuse of the old Post Office 
building, planned restoration and reuse of the old Depot building 
and long-range planning effort by Phillips Academy for use and 
maintenance of the Abbot Academy campus and all other Academy-owned 
structures . 

The Ballardvale Historic District Study Committee is working 
steadily toward the presentation of an historic district bylaw at 
the 1995 Town Meeting. The Commission is assisting in this effort. 

Commission members continue to be actively involved in 
planning the Town»s 350th Celebration. 

Chairman John Sullivan resigned after many years of service to 
the Commission and the Town. Commission members were pleased to 
honor him with emeritus status. He remains a positive voice for 
historic preservation in the Town of Andover. 



64 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. 
The regular meetings of the Board of Commissioners are held on the 
second Thursday of every month at the main office, on the second 
floor of the recreation hall at Stowe Court. 

At the Annual Meeting held on June 8, 1994, the following 
officers were elected: 



Ronald Hajj 
John Hess 
Norma Villarreal - 
Hartley Burnham - 



Chairperson 
Vice Chairman 
Treasurer 
Asst . Treasurer 



The Governor's appointee to the Board of Directors is Hartley 
Burnham. The newest elected member to the board is James 
Cut lochia. 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of state-aided 
elderly housing, 56 units of state-aided family housing, 31 units 
under the Mass. Rental Voucher Program (formerly the Chapter 707 
Program) and 8 units of handicapped housing (Chapter 689) . In 
addition, the Authority administers 59 Section 8 Certificates and 
68 Section 8 Vouchers, which are federally funded through the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

The following represents a comparison of statistical data for 
the past three years: 



STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: 



19?2 



Income Limits: 


1 person 


$21,140 




2 people 


$24,260 




3 people 


$27,180 




4 people 


$30,200 




5 people 


$32,088 




6 people 


$33,975 




7 people 


$35,750 




8 people 


$37,750 


Vacancies : 


Elderly 


45 




Family 


11 


Average Rent: 


Elderly 


$204 




Family 


$350 



1993 

$21,140 
$24,160 
$27,180 
$30,200 
$32,088 
$33,975 
$35,863 
$37,750 

37 
6 

$206 
$351 



1994 

$21,672 
$24,768 
$27,864 
$30,960 
$32,895 
$34,830 
$36,765 
$38,700 

27 
11 

$224 
$356 



65 



FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS; Section 8 Rental Assistance 

1992 1993 ;, 

Income Limits: 



1 person 


$16,800 


$16,950 


$16,950 


2 people 


$19,200 


$19,350 


$19,350 


3 people 


$21,600 


$21,800 


$21,800 


4 people 


$24,000 


$24,200 


$24,200 


5 people 


$25,900 


$26,150 


$26,150 


6 people 


$27,850 


$28,050 


$28,050 


7 people 


$29,750 


$30,000 


$30,000 


8 people 


$31,700 


$31,950 


$31,950 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 

1992 1993 1994 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef calves under one year 

Number of beef cows over two years 

Number of beef heifers one to two years 

Number of beef bulls 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds* 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses 

(includes work and saddle horses) 
Number of ponies 
Number of goats 
Number of sheep 
Number of swine 
Number of swine herds* 

* One animal constitutes a herd 



19 


29 


33 


3 


39 


29 


23 


26 


21 


1 


19 


15 


36 


34 


42 





1 


10 





21 


10 


35 





8 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


65 


69 


68 


20 


15 


19 


17 


18 


11 


6 


8 


7 


65 


68 


155 


2 


3 


2 



66 



DO I 




Jzar>U'*ly4>»< 



FFICERS 

(lORMA A. GAMMON 
jftairman 

AMES D. DOHERTY 
ice President 

■RED STOTT 
•treasurer 

11. LOUISE ORDMAN 
tecretary 



er/OU 



1996 350th Celebra tion Calendar of Events 



JANUARY • Kickoff - Old-fashioned political rally 

and reception 

FEBRUARY • "Andover at 400" - What kind of community 

should/will Andover be in 2046? 



MARCH • Celebration Ball 



APRIL • Festival of the Arts 



MAY 3,4,5 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

1IRGIN1A BEGG 
VNN CONSTANTINE 
publicity Co-Chairman 

[DWARD COLE 

\Aain Street Display Chairman 

11ARGARETR. CRONIN 

l' rtifacts Chairman 

AMES D. DOHERTY 
•aradc Chairman 

AREN M. HERMAN 
jason to Three Communities. 
'Andover, North Andover, Lawrence) 

1TEPHEN KEARN 
oston Pops Chairman 

I »AVID F. LYNCH 
IHARLESH. MURNANEJr. 
outh Activities Chairman 

.OBERT MACARTNEY 
Merchandising Chairman 

DCNTHIA MILNE 
Comptroller 

itOBERT W. PHINNEY 
Winner Chairman 

'/.DAVID RODGER 

Writing & Poetry Chairman 

WED WILLIAMS 

uogo /Graphics Coordinator 

EEPRESENTATIVES 

-AUL MURPHY 
'hillips Academy 

AMES BATCHELDER 
\ndover Historical Society 

AMES REDMOND 
Andover Schools 

OHN S. SULLWAN 
\ndover Historical Commission 



MAY 



MAY 



JUNE 
JUNE 
JULY 4 



AUGUST 30 
SEPT. 2 



SEPT. 15 



SEPT. 21 



• Anniversary Weekend - Re-enanactment of 
Town Meeting whose decisions separated 
Andover and North Andover, Firemen's 
Muster, Encampment of 28th Civil War unit 



• Anniversary Banquet - Merrimack College 



• Pancake Breakfast, music plays, 

entertainment, children's games of the past, 
Civil War Encampment 



• House and Garden Tour 



• Road Race 



• Firemen's Muster 



• Soccer tournament with Andover, England as 
well as other Andovers in the United States 



• Anniversary Parade 



• Boston Pops Concert 



350™ CELEBRATION • ANDOVER TOWN HOUSE • ANDOVER, MA O1810 



67 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

The School Building Committee presented a comprehensive 
building program at the Annual Town Meeting in April. Articles 20 
(the building program) and Article 21 (technology) were passed. In 
May, an override vote was conducted and passed. After 
reimbursement by the State, the principal cost to the Town will be: 



PROJECT 


ART. 20 


STATE 
AIL 


REIMB. 
60% 


COST TO 
TOWN 


South Elementary 
Sanborn Elementary 
High School 


$ 8,000,000 

4,000,000 

26,500,000 


$ 4,800, 

2,400, 

15,900, 


,000 
,000 
,000 


$ 3,200,000 

1,600,000 

10.600.000 

$15,400,000 




ART. 21 










Computer Technology 


$ 2,000,000 








2.000.000 
$17,400,000 



During the summer, an early sitework construction package was 
awarded to Quirk Construction in the amount of $300,000. The work 
was performed at the South Elementary School and the Sanborn 
Elementary School in order to avoid interference between school and 
construction traffic during the additions and renovations projects. 

The School Building Committee worked over the summer with the 
architects and project manager to prepare construction documents 
and bid packages for South Elementary School and the High School. 
In the fall, the SBC voted to delay the start of the Sanborn 
project until the 1995 summer recess. There were concerns that 
construction noise would impact the operation of the classrooms. 
The additions are within the courtyards between the wings of the 
building. 

The construction contract for the South Elementary School 
addition and renovation project was awarded to R. W. Granger in the 
amount of $5,994,200. A groundbreaking ceremony was conducted on 
December 5, 1994. The mild weather in December has allowed the 
project to proceed smoothly. The first concrete pour took place on 
December 22nd. 

In late December, the construction contract for the High 
School addition and renovation project was awarded to the joint 
venture of Stone/Congress in the amount of $20,226,000. 
Construction is anticipated to start in early January, 1995. 

The balance of the costs in each project will be for 
architectural and project management fees and, as typically 
practiced, there are sums set aside for each project as 
"construction contingencies". These will be used to offset any 
costs which may arise as a result of unforeseen conditions. 



68 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 
Richard R. Muller, Chairman 
Susan T. Dalton, Secretary 
William J. Huston, Jr. 
Mary Kelvie Lyman 
Lloyd J. Willey 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, Massachusetts 01810 

(508) 470-3800 x401 

FAX (508) 475-8493 



RICHARD E. NEAL 

Superintendent of Schools 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Andover School Department 



The school population of the Andover Public Schools grew to 5291 
students during the course of 1994. These students and the 501 staff and 
support personnel are housed in a 9-12 high school, two 6-8 middle 
schools, four K-5 elementary schools, and one K-2 Integrated Primary 
Magnet School. The elected School Committee members who oversee the 
school system meet at least twice monthly. The FY '95 appropriation of 
$24,402,042 was supplemented by a special appropriation of $600,460 at 
a special town meeting in December as a result of the need to increase net 
school spending to meet the target for Andover as specified under the 
Educational Reform Law. The total appropriation enabled the school 
department to continue to provide a quality educational program for the 
students of Andover while allowing the administration and staff to 
continue initiatives to up-date and improve the overall curriculum and 
instructional program. Meanwhile, at the 1994 Annual Town Meeting, the 
voters of Andover approved a comprehensive school building program 
which will provide for renovated and additional facilities at the Sanborn 
and South Elementary Schools and at Andover High School. In addition, a 
Technology Initiative was also approved which will allow for the 
technological up-grade of all schools. This vote was supported by an 
override vote for a debt exclusion to allow the projects to proceed. These 
projects will be 60% reimbursed by the Commonwealth. 

School Committe e 

The Andover School Committee welcomed one new member in March with 
the election of Mr. Lloyd J. Willey. 



69 



Following the election and the addition of this new member the 
School Committee elected Mr. Richard Muller as Chairperson and Mrs. 
Susan Dalton as Secretary. The Committee then set to work to develop and 
outline several goals for the 1994-95 school year. The goals indicated the 
committee's intention to: 

(1) Appoint a new Superintendent by July 1, 1995. 

(2) Review before and after school usage of facilities and consider 

plans to better meet the needs of students, community, and the 
school system. 

(3) Meet the requirements of the Education Reform Act of 1993 

relative to all professional contracts. 

(4) Work with all responsible parties to facilitate the smooth 

operation of the School Building Program. 

(5) Review the curriculum plans of the school system. 

(6) Review and update the School Committee Policy Manual. 

(7) Review maintenance of all school facilities. 

(8) Review finance and operating budget issues. 

(9) Review and comment on the School Improvement Plans presented 

by each School Council. 

(10) Begin a preliminary review and evaluation of the Special Needs 

Program. 

With these goals defining the benchmarks for the 1994-95 school 
year the School Committee: 

* Worked with the School Building Committee to refine educational 

specifications for the renovation and expansion of the Sanborn 
and South Elementary Schools and Andover High School. 

* Appointed an Interim Superintendent and Interim Assistant 

Superintendent of Schools. 



70 



* Began an intensive review of all School Committee Policies. 

* Appointed an Ad Hoc Technology Committee. 

* Engaged a Technology Consultant K-8. 

* Approved a job description for a Collins Center Planner. 

* Developed a timeline and process for the Superintendent search. 

* Reviewed and modified the school system philosophy. 

* Reviewed recommendations of the Municipal Maintenance Audit. 

* Began a study of redistricting plans for the elementary schools. 

* Conducted a curriculum workshop relative to science and language 

arts. 

* Participated in Department of Education workshops relative to 

Educational Reform Law. 

Notable Milestones 

In the spring, Dr. Mark McQuillan, Superintendent of Schools, notified 
the School Committee that he would be resigning his post in August to 
accept the Superintendency of the Lincoln School System. The School 
Committee appointed Mr. Richard E. Neal, Assistant Superintendent of 
Schools, as Interim Superintendent, and Ms. Denise B. Littlefield, 
Assistant Principal of the West Elementary School, as Interim Assistant 
Superintendent for the 1994-95 school year. Certainly, the most notable 
milestone for the Andover School Department was the approval of a $38.5 
million debt exclusion override which enabled much needed renovations 
and expansion of the Sanborn and South elementary schools and the 
Andover High School to move forward. With the expectation that some 400 
additional students will attend Andover High School in the future the 
addition of a new science wing, an additional physical education facility, 
and a complete renovation of the existing building was much needed. 



71 



Central Administratio n 

The Central Administration developed an annual action plan which 
supported the direction of the School Committee. Several projects were 
completed or initiated during the course of the year by the Superintendent 
and/or Assistant Superintendent. Through their activities they: 

* Developed a long-range financial plan for FY '94-FY '00. 

* Explored means to generate additional revenue for the schools. 

* Initiated first annual Youth Town Meeting. 

* Initiated first annual Youth Town Government Day. 

* Conducted public forums on leveling and inclusion. 

* Conducted administrative workshops on Educational Reform. 

* Developed job description for Collins Center Strategic Planner. 

* Began study of expanded before and after school programs. 

* Developed a draft of Professional Standards for professional 

personnel. 

* Worked closely with School Building Committee and Project 

Manager on school building projects. 

* Developed a model for redistricting of elementary school 

students. 

* Reviewed and presented recommendations relative to maintenance 

of school buildings and grounds. 

* Conducted systemwide orientation for school council members. 

Initiated planning to fully integrate technology into all areas of 

the curriculum. 



72 



* Established technology committee and hired technology 

consultant. 

* Began review of State Curriculum Frameworks. 

* Revised and up-dated school committee policies. 

* Provided for smooth and orderly change of superintendents. 

* Implemented a new foreign language program Grades 6-12. 

* Prepared for annual and special town meeting. 

Notable Accomplishments 

The first annual Youth Town Meeting was an overwhelming success. 
The youth of Andover need and deserve an opportunity to have a forum 
through which they can have a voice in activities and events of the town 
which directly effect them. Hopefully, this forum will grow over the 
years to take its rightful place in the life of Andover. This was the first 
full year of educational reform implementation. The law covers a wide 
variety of areas of school operation both on a day-to-day basis as well as 
in long range planning. The school administration has fully involved itself 
in understanding and keeping abreast of the multitude of activities 
surrounding this law. 

Business Departmen t 

Significant effort from the Finance Office during 1994 went into 
plans for the school construction projects, calculations and budgeting for 
school spending required by the Education Reform Act, and forecasting and 
planning to accommodate the ever increasing student population in the 
Town. 

New emphasis was placed on accounting for all expenditures by the 
School Committee or Town on behalf of education. Analysis of operations 
and maintenance services and expenditures (custodial, heat and utilities, 
and maintenance) was part of this effort. Additionally, regular meetings 
of Senior Custodians with the Business Manager resulted in clearer 
procedures for purchasing of custodial supplies, a new priority format for 



73 



work order requests to the Maintenance Department, and tighter 
performance evaluation procedures. 

In the spirit of Total Quality Management, the School Accounting 
Department worked more closely than ever with the Town-side 
Treasurer's and Accountant's offices to implement a seamless 
reconciliation and reporting process. 

The Food Service Department significantly enhanced student 
participation in the program by adding brand-name pizza to the menu. At 
year's end the State conducted an audit of the program and gave it "top 
marks" for all areas of its operation, with special mention of the 
cleanliness of the kitchens. 

In an effort to foster paper conservation, the Copy Center offered a 
discount on documents copied on both sides of the page. New options in 
sorting and binding improved the service offerings of the center, as welt. 

Personnel Departmen t 

As in previous years, the Personnel Department was busy assisting 
Town and School officials with the recruitment and hiring of staff. In all, 
approximately 5% of the Town's total workforce was replaced filling 
vacancies created by resignations or retirements. 

The School Department received approval on both the local and state 
level to participate in the state's Teacher Early Retirement Incentive 
Program. The State notified the School Department in early September 
that nine teachers were eligible to retire under the provisions of this 
program. With these and other retirements, resignations, and new 
positions, nineteen new teachers were hired for the '94-'95 school year. 

The Personnel Department also continued to be involved in staff 
development and training programs. The Employee Assistance Program 
provided training to both school and town staff in the areas of workplace 
safety and stress management. Additionally, the Personnel Department 
continued to be very involved in scheduling and arranging for total quality 
process improvement training for town and school department employees. 
Annual benefit seminars for town, school, and retiree populations are held 
annually and are well attended. 



74 



Other Achievements 
Schools and Program s 
Andover High Schoo l 

* Community Service Program staged a 24-hour Relay Challenge 

complete with a "Tent City". Nearly 400 students, town 
officials, and residents participated. 

* Approximately 300 students volunteered 8000 hours at more than 

20 programs in the Merrimack Valley. 

* Six Senior Class members achieved National Merit Semi-finalist 

status while eighteen received Commended status. 

* 122 students took a total of 204 Advanced Placement Tests. 87% 

received a grade which qualified them to receive college 
credit. 33 were recognized as A.P. Scholars for receiving 
qualifying grades in three or more exams. 

* A partnership was continued with the Andover Service Club to 

develop a mentoring program between employees and students. 
Twenty-two students participated this year. 

* Twenty-one students received extensive training as peer 

mediators. 

Dohertv Middle Schoo l 

* School Council formed to enrich educational community. 

* Parental involvement enhanced - PAC, School Council, Homework 

Hangout, Guest Speakers, Field Trips, Book Fairs, Media Center 
Assistants, School-wide Committees. 

* 90% of staff participated in at least one professional development 

opportunity. 

* Opportunities expanded for parents to visit school and observe 

students in the process of learning. 

* Efforts expanded to improve articulation between Doherty and its 

feeder elementary schools. 

West Middle Schoo l 

* Eighth grade students scored consistently high on the Stanford 

Achievement Tests as well as on the Massachusetts 
Educational Assessment Program. 



75 



* Computer Technology instruction was added to the integrated arts 

program for 8th grade students. 

* Homework assignment notebooks made available for students to 

monitor the skill of recording and completing assignments. 

* Over $2.0 million of repairs and renovations completed. This 

includes front windows, new team room and health education 
room, and heating renovations. 

* Third annual West Fest conducted by Parent Advisory Council. 

* More than thirteen service projects completed for the school and 

the community. 

* A successful parent volunteer program in place. 

Bancroft Elementary Scho ol 

* 1994 marked Bancroft's 25th birthday. A day-long festival and 

celebration marked the occasion. In 1969, Bancroft opened its 
doors to 450 students; today it is home to 640 students. 

* Several improvements were made to the physical plant: skylight 

replacement, carpeting in lower level, painted front foyer and 
hallways, relpacement of cafeteria tables, and improvements 
to parking lots. 

* A Digital Corporation training grant helped to fund a partnership 

with the Boston Museum of Science which supported teacher 
training and classroom kit rentals. 

* Several PTO/Family events were held: Family Fun Science 

Festival, Pasta Supper, Ice Cream Social, Family Fun Run. 

* "Winter Carnival" introduced this year. 

* School-wide theme of "Be A Leader" implemented. 

* Before school enrichment program provided multi-age mini- 

courses offered by parents and faculty. 

Sanborn Elementary Schoo l 

* Due to large numbers of students (476) no specialized art or music 

facilities available and cafetorium used four days per week as 
gymnasium. 

* Renovation and expansion plans underway with preliminary work 

completed: additional parking; traffic loop, soccer field. 

* Active PTO donated playground equipment, computers, printers, 

and a duplicating machine. 

* Approximately 200 volunteers assisted the school. 



7C 



* The School Council identified science and character development 

as target areas. 

* Respect and Responsibility were themes of regular school and 

class meetings. 

Shawsheen Integrated Prima ry Maanet School 

* As a magnet school, enrollment continued to grow reaching 232 

students 

* School Council organized 

* Parental survey identified the following as positive attributes of 

the school: Professionalism of staff; Positive atmosphere; 
Small size of school; Quality of integrated curriculum; Special 
programs. 

South Elementary Schoo l 

* School Theme: "Community of Learners". 

* 35th Birthday of South School celebrated. 

* Odyssey of the Mind program established. 

* Partnership with Genetics Institute. 

* Collaboration with the Boston Globe. 

* Development of a variety of enrichment programs through efforts 

of Enrichment Team. 

* Positive involvement of PTO. 

* Development of School Improvement Plan. 

West Elementary Schoo l 

* School Theme: "Reason, Respect, & Responsibility". 

* Enrollment rose to highest level since sixth grade moved to middle 

school. 

* Several improvements made to physical plant including increased 

outside lighting, safety fences, and new doors. 

* Eight new staff members joined staff. 

* Several successful community service projects completed. 

* Beautiful mural added to wall of cafeteria by local artisans. 

* Development of School Improvement Plan. 



77 



Athletics 



Over 70% of high school student body participated in athletic 

teams. 
Over 1300 roster spots filled throughout the school year on teams. 
Seventh place overall win/loss record in top 50 high schools. 
Division champions in Basketball, Golf, Skiing, Baseball, Track, 

Gymnastics, and Tennis. 
Athletes participated in several community service projects. 



Fine Arts 



* Marching Band placed second in New England Scholastic Band 

Competition, receiving a gold medal. 

* Twenty middle school students were chosen to perform at the 

Junior District Festival. 

* Eight high school students were chosen to perform at the 

Senior District Festival. 

* Seven high school students were chosen to audition for All-State 

Band. 

* Fourteen high school and seven middle school students submitted 

art work for the Boston Globe Competition. 
Over 400 students performed at the Fine Arts Festival and over 250 
pieces of student art work were exhibited. 



Health 



* "Bridging the Gap" communication conference conducted for all 

seventh graders and their parents. 

* Parent to Parent Newsletters published for parents in grades 4-8 

* Peer Mediation training provided for middle school and high school 

staff plus sixteen 10th-12th grade students. 

* In-service training provided for all K-5 staff on child abuse 

prevention, referral, and support services. 

* HIV/AIDS and Universal Precaution Procedure training conducted 

for each school faculty. 

* Community Action Committee, after a year of public forums. 

presented a multi-faceted plan. 



78 



Physical Educatio n 

* K-2 screening instrument (Andover Perceptual Motor Test) revised. 

* Norms developed for Grade 5 Knowledge Assessment video. 

* High School Project Challenge curriculum completed and 

implemented. 

* Task Force work started to revise high school Fitness for Life 

curriculum. 

* Successful annual fourth and fifth grade track meet conducted. 

* West Elementary Jump Rope for Heart successfully held. 

* Construction of new soccer fields at South and Sanborn Elementary 

Schools completed. 

* Construction of new gymnasium at South School started. 

* Plans for new physical education facility at high school completed. 

Special Education 

* As of December 1, 1994, 607 students (11.3% of the student 

population) were receiving special education services. More 
that two-thirds of these students received services to 
compliment their full regular academic program. 

* Three full time teachers provide services to students in Andover 

with limited English proficiency. 53 students receive English 
as a Second Language services. 

* In June, 1994, 28 students who received special education 

services graduated from Andover High School. Of these, 68% 
went on to college or other post-secondary education. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Richard E. Neal 
Superintendent of Schools 



.79 



TOWN OF AN DOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET 

June 30,1994 



GENERAL 
FUND 



CAPITAL 
PROJECT 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



LONG-TERM 

DEBT 



GRAND 
TOTAL 



ASSETS 
Cash and Equivalents 
Other Investments 
Accounts Reclevabtes: 

Property Taxes 

Excise Taxes 

Water & Sewer Charges 

Tax Liens 

Deterred Tax 

Departmental Revenue 

Special Assessments 

Due from other Governments 
Total Cash & Reclevabies 



4,083,943.75 1,968,549.87 1,966.526.98 



1,697,797.67 

726,70246 

914.66662 

2,245.260.24 

30,9 16.07 

143,078.24 

615,45376 

1,72577 



8,039,022 60 



1,097.797.67 

726.70246 

914.08662 

2.245.28024 

30,916 07 

143,07824 

615.45376 

1.725 77 



10,459.564.56 



1.988.54987 1.966.52898 



000 



14.414.663 43 



Other Assets 

Tax Possessions 

Bond Aniclpation Notes Payable 
Long Term Obligations 
Total Assets 



96.259 13 



2.377,000.00 1.228,000.00 



30.312.360 00 



10,555,843 71 4,365.549 87 3,194.528 98 



30. 312. 360 00 



96.250 13 

3.005.000 00 
30.312.360 00 



48.428.272 56 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Trust Funds 

Accrued Payroll Withholdings 
Reserve lor Abatements 
Deterred Revenue 
Due to Other Governments 
Unclaimed Items 

Excess on Sales ot Low Value Land 
Guarentee Deposits 
Bond Anticipation Notes 
Bonds Payable- Inside Debt Limit 
Bonds Payable- Outside Debt Umit 
Lease Obligations 
Bonds Payable- Special Legislation 

Total Liabilities 



(51.050 76) 

(88,713.93) 

(430,86994) 

(5,701,190 37) 

(075) 

(05.800 11) 

(4,30574) 

(27,50274) 



(083.31) 



(2.377.000.00) (1. 228.00000! 



(10.900.000 00) 

(11,695.000 00) 

(7.222.350.00) 

(415,000 00) 



(51,050 76) 

(88.713.93) 

(430.86994) 

(5.701.190 37) 

(084 06) 

(05.800 11) 

(4.305 74) 

(27.502 74) 

(3.005.000 00) 

(10.960.000.00) 

(11.696,000 00) 

(7.222,350 00) 

(415.000 00) 



(6.369.434.34) (2.377.000.00) (1,228.663.31) (30.312.360.00) (40287.467 66) 



Fund Balances 
Unreserved 

Continued AppropnaDons 
Encumbrances 
Over/Under Assessments 
Appropriation Deficits 
Unprovided tor Abates & Exempts 
Workers Compensation 

Total Fund Balances 

Total Llab. & Fund Balance 



(3.285.120.29) 

(137.90545) 

(1.369,653.36) 

24,809 00 

459,095.16 

194,365.57 

(72,000.00) 



(1,791.468 63) 
(197,08124) 



(1,951.441 81) 



(14,403 86) 



(5.236.502 10) 

(1,929.374.08) 

(1,561.138 46) 

24.809 00 

459.09516 

194,365.57 

(72,000 00) 



(4.186.409.37) 


(1,988.549 87) (1.965.645.67) 


0.00 


(8,140.604.91) 


(10,555,843.71) 


(4,365,549.87) (3.194.528.98) 


(30,312.350 00) 


(48.428.272.56) 



80 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

RECEIPTS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1994 

GROUP 1 

INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS ESTIMATES 



MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

OTHER EXCISE 

PAYMENTS AND INTEREST 

PAYMENTS IN UEU OF TAXES 

CHARGES FOR SERVICES-WATER 

CHARGES FOR SERVICES- SEWER 

FEES 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE -SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE - UBRARIES 

DEPARTMENTAL REVENUE-CEMETERIES 

DEPARTMENTAL REVNEUE- OTHER 

UCENSES AND PERMITS 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

FINES AND FORFEITS 

INVESTMENT INCOME 



GROUP II 
OTHER ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



AMBULANCE 

DMM- FACILITIES RENTAL 
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 
PREMIUM ON BOND PROCEEDS 



GROUP III 
OTHER RECEIPTS 



REAL ESTATE TAXES 
PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 
STATE AID-CHERRY SHEET 
OTHER STATE REVENUES 
UBRARY CONSORTIUM 
SHED RENTAL 
REVOLVINGS AND GRANTS 
TRUST AND AGENCY 
TEMPORARY BONDING ACTIVITY 
LONG TERM BONDING ACTIVITY 
MATURITIES OF INVESTMENTS 
TAX TITLES AND POSSESSIONS 
UNALLOCATED 
PETTY CASH 



2,366,439.35 

500,939.00 

232,391.92 

2,016.00 

4,832,580.06 

2,037,523.94 

39,227.92 

26,902.16 

35,184.01 

35,395.00 

113,706.90 

714,746.68 

110,640.23 

290,894.00 

183,718.05 



11,522,305.22 



219,758.71 
91,761.81 

283,959.01 
10,299.20 



605,778.73 



42,522,219.60 

1,095,506.21 

3,829,705.91 

139,189.00 

94,170.00 

30,000.00 

4,188,535.90 

8,135,192.28 

3,605,000.00 

4,100,000.00 

22,498,944.21 

148,209.86 

444,754.78 

1,525.00 



90,832,952.75 



102,961,036.70 



81 



5 8 



5 § 



LU 



O CD 

co u. 



z 

I 



"I 



Si 
5« 



O LL 



8? 



to 

I- 
a 

8 

LU 

a: 



£ I 

* o 



a 

LU CL 

3 * 

z a 

p 8- 

g< 
u 



s 

z 

S 

8 

o 



15 


8 


8 


! 


8" 


V 




CO 




K 




o 




CM 


8! 


CO 


8 


OS 


CD 


N- 


8 8 


o 


O 


ei 


*~ 


8 


CO 


8 8 


r«. 


■v 


fc" 8~ 


o 


»- 


01 




J? 




1 




5 




8 


8 


§ 


b 

8 


2 






8 




i 




r^ 




o 




CO 




s 




o 




of 


8 


8 


CM 

CO 


i 


o 


io" 


8 


IO 


8 8 


e 

V 


§ 


8" 

CO 


k" 

8 


o 




o 


CO 


6 


CO 




5 




? 



s 

O 



ff 



O CM 
O 0) 


o 6 


co" 


8 


O CM 
CO If) 


•*■ CO 


8 g 


9 § 


£ 8 


(ft CO 


5" 8 


IO 1^ 


ff 8 


15 g 


a o 


S 8" 


to — 


■»" oi 


O CO 


|l 


r^ io 


£. w 


8 


§ 


B 


CM 


K 


t 


oT 


8 


N 


0) 


V 


«> 


8 8 


S§ 


8 8 


8 8 


8 2 


CO *- 


8 8* 


in cd 


g 8 


d i 


V 


8 



£ 8 



is 

£ 
O 



8 


r*. cp 
CM c» 


s 


o' 8 


O) 


O) ~ 


CO 


CD" Ol 


8 


V 


CM 


CO 


CD 


Ol 


s 


V 


O 




8 


CO 9 

r>. Oi 


8 

OI 


IO CO 

2 S 


8 

CO 


9 Q 

oi io 


CO 


io" 


8 


8 e> 


8 

o 


ii 


CD" 


it 


CO 


K> 


o 




o 




d 




sf 


{? 


§ 


§ 


i 


8 


8 


8 8 


§ 


3§ 


8 


8" 2 


CM 




N. 




H 




OI 




o 




o 




d 




8 


8 


k 


IO 


? 


fc 


io 




8 


8 8 


8 


§§ 


8! 


8" 8 


8 


8 8 


5? 


fc £ 


▼ 


CD CO 


8 


8 8" 


CO 


Ol V 


CO 


to" 


8 


8 5 


i 


it 


V 


f^ CM 


8 


V 



E! 



5 

£ 
O 



«? 



8 8 



CD IO 

<■" IO 



8 8 

Ol CO 

lo" 8" 

CD CO 

»-" to" 



8 
8 

CO 
CD 8 

8 8 

Ol 
CO 



8 8 8 



o o» 

s & 

CD 01 



Hi 

8 5 



lit 



8 


CO IO 
CO p 


g 


CO 8 


Ol 


CD CO 


8 


io" r»* 


to- 


3 


vl 


oi 


o 


CM 


f^ 




8 




8 


; 8 


4 


S 8" 


o 


CO V 


8' 


8 § 

p CO 


r»" 


*~ 


Ol 
CO 


8 8 


t 


(5 2 


CO 


•* o 


vT 


»" CD 


IO 
IO 


p CO 


h" 


»~ 


o 




o 




d 




8 


c? 


§ 


§ 


CD" 


o 


8 




8 


8 8 


§ 


55 8 


?" 


8 55 


o 




o 




d 




8 




8 




CD 




•* 


CD 


CD 


»■ 


8 


8 


at 


CO 


CO 


"^ 


o 




o 




d 




8 


8 8 


o 


a 


CM 


CM CO 




8 8 


co" 




8 


o ot 


8 


°i 


0» 


v_ 


o 


^ 







ff 






O CM O 

o r* o 


CM 


8 


o — d 


v^ 


i— 


8 


8 


8 


h" 


r«" 


co" 


8 


8 

o 
o 
d 


Ol 


£.8 8 


IO 




336 
897 

,810. 


CO 

3 




g t g 

CO 0) 


f 




» CO* 


8 




£88 




8 


336 
289 

,810 


8 


8 


,365, 

185, 

79 


§ 


CO 
Ol 


2 * 


8 




8 8 8 


8 


8 


§§ d 


8 


8 


io" co 
8 8 


Ol" 


oT 


CM 


CM 


8 % 


o 
o 




ii 


d 




$ r£ 


o 
o 
d 






o 
o 


J? 




d 


i 

Ol 


o 
o 


o 
o 


i 


d 

CM 


d 

CM 


§ 


"" 


""" 


d 

8 


CM V> 
0) N. 


& 




CM CM 
01 "» 


i 




« g 


B 

o 

o 
d 




8 8 8 


o 
o 


8 


960 
108 
,600 


§ 


§ 


,679, 

042, 

78 


§ 


CO 

B 


CD V 


8 




O Q O 

O CO O 


8 


8 


° S ° 


i 


§ 


CO 


9" 


8" 



§ 




CO "< 
Z O 



82 



o o o 
o o o 
odd 



o o 
o o 
d d 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 
d d d d d 





ii 




< 




tr „ 




E » 




~ 


SETTS 

DQET 

1994 


5! lb 
z » 


D 3 . 


OC ^p 


I a 2 


^ 2 


9 i f? 


z »- 


< ' ui 




CO D Z 




S? z 3 

< D ^ 


00 

_ h- 


5 U- Q 


er 5 


j> ui g 


£ 


8 


8 §S 


< 


z O S 

< U. £ 
LL O J 
O Q. < 


il 


|S8 


O u. 


2 111 U. 




P tr 




»- 


Ill 




£ 




■ 5 

S u. 




c 




» 




t- 




Q. 




8 




UI 




tr 




00 




*~ *- 




Ul a 




05 i7i 




O Uj 



s 1 



77.856. 

36,528. 




5 £ 

-- cm 


H8888 


8 


8 8 * 8 


042. 
550. 
,000. 
,943 
600. 
,000 


i 


,185 
133 
,313 
,918 


¥ !i 8 s « 

m n oo ▼ 


8 


O to ^*• 

»- r^ 00 to 

10 V 


cm c> ri 




«- 



3 888 8 8 

$88888 

CD (O O <D p 



8 Jo 8 
of «" 





SS 




§§ 




cm d 




Sg 


8 




§ 




8 





CM Q 
(O 8 


8 


8£ 


8 


0" ct> 
■V 

CM — 





8 8 8 8 8 8 

288888 

<o r»_ p » ep_ p 

a) O) © r S ft 
O — C» f- 

cm m c> 



000000 
000000 

d d d d d d 
10 
00 



88H8 



8 8 



8 55 3 £ 

»- « Ci 01 

a> of k N 

■*- r» cd to 

10 ■* 



3 S 

«- 10 



8 8 8 8 8 
i 8 8 § 5 



00000 
00000 
d d d 






8 


8 


£ 


10 


p» 


CD" 


S 




» 


8 


a> 


g 


$ 


CM 


8 


at 


CD 


r«. 


a> 


1 


01 

O) 


ft 


8" 

10 


CM 


to" 


CD 


to 


O 





3 


g 


K' 


of 


CM 


r£ 


V 


o> 


cm" 


8 






8 





°> 




8 




CD 




8 


ff 


10 


§ 


§ 


CM 


t 


r» 


2. 







8 


8 


§ 


8 


8 


Of 

8 














d 


d 














d 


d 


8 


8 


^ 


li 


CM 


^- 


to" 


v 


8 


¥ 






8 


d 


ff 




o> 




cm" 




8 














s 


» 

▼ 


6 


s 


CM 


8' 


O 


K 


O 


▼ 


8 


I 


a> 


V 




8 



83. 



Q 

UJ n 

1— Q. 

8* 

E £ 



s 

Q 

5 



e i 



CO 



CO fft 



a? 



3 
s 

□ 

s 

8 

si 



(o 5 ir 
& u. O 



i = 

UJ 

2 C? 

o z 

CO 

E 



& CO n 

is a 

fi cr 

& 
cr 



Z ^ 

8* 

°5 



as 

5 P 



8 8 



IS 
8 

* 8" 8" 



s 8 e 



8 8 



8 



8 



CO CJ CO 

9 W 9 co 

ri § eric* 

3 O 3 CO 

OL Q. Q. < 



8 



8 8 8 

CO r^ 



8 8 8 



8 



8 



8 8 8 

O CD <K 

a" & ss 



* & 8 

8" B *-" 

§88 
3 £ 8" 



§88 
9* £ 8 



8 




23888 



S? S I 8 8 

OJ <m" eg — 



23888 

cm" n $2 "^ 



t*. 


io 


to 


^- 


s 


£ 


a" 




8 


8 


o 


o 


8 


8 


o 


8 




1 




S 


s 


8 


8" 


1" 


8 


8 


o 


o 


8 


8 


o 


o 


8 


8 


o 


o 


8 


8 


o 


o 


8 


8 


d 


^m 




? 




g. 


te 


s 


^ 


jr 


s 


lo 


a" 


8 








SlBBSES 



eS8i!KS ° 



Q 

Z 
3 



UJ 

o 

Q 



y E 

O CD 

51 



iiiS 

« w S ^ 
»- »— I— t— 

5555 



o> <5> O) 
r»^ g-" m" 
i— t— i— 

555 



S S 8 
t— ►— i— 

555 



O) * V3 * U) 

t a" a fc" $? 

>— •— i— »— •— 

55555 



84 



z tr 

►- a. 



8 



CO 



3 ffi 1 
li 8 

» < UJ 

ill 

|bffi 



te o 8 

z •- w 
< tr 



e 

o 

s 



§ 



LU 



tr 

UJ 

X 

^5 



8 



Q 

Z 

i 

UJ 

5 

o 



(0 

ft £ 
15 



& 

tr 
a. 

3: 

la 
1* 

z <r 



8 



3 

5 



— " s" cd o" w 10" o" oJ io ap eS c\J co »- of op" yr 
SB X 85 "~ v r« v OJ 00 •- ■- « IS in 



8 



8 8 2 8 X 8 $ 8 

O UJ K Oi O) IQ S (D 

828? S 8 8 fc 

"■" °>" SS fc 5 8" 8 



i8SS^S^PSS88S8t888 

aSoNow'-NiBiO'- ^-ovIoKotojO 



^ I g 2! $ » g $ 8«ig;<28 



Sj v 



ST 



8 



8 8 8 



ft! 8 £ 

w »- ^ 



8 
8" 



i§s§s5^8i^2i^ 

— fceocjc\iineT><>J«? of 



R 



8 



W N O O) O) © 

SS8tS| 

t b K o B a 
<o V <"> 55 "^ if 

35 — »- © g- 0D 



S 



J£ UJ 

4§ 




tr tr 
< < 






ff 



8 



8 



S - ^ e 8 

8P8 

O O t~. o 

5: 8 g" Jg" 

to P» co ui 



5 8> 8 

K £ * 

cu uS tf> 

§ g § 

E 8 8 8 

Sja 58 

O) ■«- <Sj o 

id" co" o id 

eg --" 



& 



8 8 



68 



N K 5 

5 ^- <B 
£ «°" 8 



ti 



CO 

I 
CO 

I— 

UJ CO 

3 i 

cr «J 

Q. °- 

* d 

x o 



d a 

5 It! 6 

666 
000 

I X X X 

cB co o5 co 



8 



8 



S 



8 



o 

OJ 



ff 



ES 



8 



8 



8 

o 



8 
ft 



8 
8 
t 

8 



ST 



ES 



8 



& 



cr 
o. 



Q. 

5 
o 



y E 

o m 

51 



iiiiiiiiiiliiiiigigi |||| 

8" fc 5" Si £ S < £" 8" R* 8" <§> 8" 5: <?" 5 tf <§> 8 &" # S < g" 

trfctttt' - fc *- •— •— *— •— •— •— »— •— »— i— 1— t— 1— t— t— 

55555555555555555555 55 55 



85 



1 



m 

z 

5 



i s 

2g 



CM O) *- |f> tf> 

K « >■ f- >" 

tt> co to 



-DIOIDDIOSOQ 

5 n " 8" « 



dcM«c>ojep"ddddddddddddddcor^'>-^r^du> 
'-05® n.n-v^.KOco 

•^ e> V « o» «" jo cn «- 



H^usng88 88sg8nns8?n^s§ns8^§$ 

tocMKJoJco^riridoJb — or^Qdc>JV^flp»vdr>p>dt>QSJSa>«>Q>d<Ndd''» ; 

-" 8 |" 8 S 2 8 «" 18 ">" r N " "■" *■" °" * v -" «* w " 8 5 * 8 8" w " 



S2 co 
2 z 






$SSNUn«S88 88^8?Un8^n^5S!§g8U8eS 

SSRS'tS^osozStBociij'jjtoBoiotciiNejiflicigo 
£8^8SS28je^8l?8oJ?l5 $ 8?;8558fe2§8egSii S K 

8 IS 2 8 5 12 •" "" K * *"" *"* n ~ w " v *"* rf w " 8 S " § 8* 



= *§! 



§§ 



? 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 S 8 S .. . . 
S" le g 8" 2 8" £ 5 8 



NO'-N'-OWIft 



▼ « 8 8 8 

<2 CM «" t p ' t 



88888888888888888 

-SljeNBOiciVQOdioQQQQ 

n t s io 8 >- o S S 8 8 e o 8 8 o. 8 

S £ g 9* £ 8" £ 5" ? 



CO *- N. — CO » ID 



8 

8 

o 

8* 



— o 

CM p 



8 8 8 

▼ 8 8 

8" -" *" 



CO CM 

CM CO 

CO K 



CO CM 

k co 



8 

2 



to jo © «o ▼ o ie> 

T "! T T "? P ™ 

§ £ 8 co J? 8 5> 



US8SSU 
dtdo>Kcotf>^*-»od 

S288£8$2?fc8 

»* £ t S «" a" g 



2 




131 



o 



5 
Si 

CL 
O 
F 
UI 

CO < 



86 



a. *" 
4 8" 

a 1 

a. 3 

CO 

LL 

o 






z 

5 



o 
to 

2 



8 

cm" 


CM Q «0 

« < e 

^ S £ 
t eg t> 

CD 


13.404.72 
1.672.26 
9.147.72 
1.403.05 
4.896.20 


8 

d 


)4.6 14.00 
2.043.72 
5.444.58 


13,038.43 

0.00 

2,057.38 

2.272.50 



8828?8co*!58 
» 3 I 8 8h 

f w" Ifl* n cm cm 

8g««ieeonp 
, « » « - ; « ^ e s 

J88Si$fc82l 

<*" 8" 2 «> 8 *"" ^" *■" "■" 



g 852¥S • 8 



w 6 E 

CM CO 



r « n in 



8 



8 8 fe ? ; 8 

s S S S S s 



t r> o o o co co 

co at O o o to to 

CO ' K> CM d d •*■ ' *" 

CO o" fc to 



10 CO CO o o o o 



£ 8 fe 8 S 

5 6 <6 CM CO 

0) CM « (ft 

<■ S • 8 o 



* § i § oi 



88888882888 

fdcocoddddddoid 

NO? S 

co" < to K 


1,894.59 

0.00 

257.65 


77,000.00 

57,574.25 

43,990.00 

950.00 






7.38 

6,021.58 
10,544.03 


CO" 




8 


8 
8 

h»" 


54,721.26 

20,892.00 

3,311.49 


8 

d 

8 

8 














r7.000.00 

», 180.41 
6,307.00 




8 8 

to d 








IS 8 

to oi 

8 S 

-"" to 




8000 
O O CO 

<o d d f* 

8 8 2 



8 ° 8 E 

i 8 § i 

CO' CM g 



8 ? 

oi *- 

5 CO 

V co 



s 



8 



8 



CoOpCOCMC»COOr» 

setTB'-fiicfteR 



CM CM O* T- CD 0» 



8888888888 

dddddriddd 



8 



888888888 

§0600 
8 



888888?S8 

0» CO CM CM Of *- CO 



8 

d 

8 

CM 



o 
o 

cr 

a. 
z 



B 

(0 

X 

o 

CO 



3 

o a 2 . o 

« z z a t 2 

2 3 Z D 5 

i g S 1 1 tt - 

tr _j co o o 



o o o LL 



z 2 * 

8 5 5 

LL O Z 



.coppcocMpJopco 



O 10 

l»- >o 

*- CO CO 



8 




87 



CD 



CO 



CO 

a 

2 

* s 



i * 

< o 

ft S 

Is 

s 



8 
o £ 
52 w 
2 z 



09 

ft 

IS 

5 g 



*3 

N 

I 



o 



m 



o 2 



ssn 


S 


6 


o ▼ cm 


r^ 




? R 


^ 




8 t 


2 


CM 

ID 


8 8 8 


3 


ID 


a> » *- 

» 8 © 


8 




«D A 


8 




8 


8 




d 


d 




8 


8 




8 


8 


<N 

to 


8 8 8 


8 


i 


CD to ^ 
to to to 


8 




r»" r*.' ~ 


n 




CD »- 


o 


CM 

to 


8 8 8 


8 


P 


58J 


8 


40 


tO O O 


(0 




-- g g 


ci 




v 






CM 

8 

ci 




8 s p 


8 




$2 8 


o 




* 8" P 


2 
8 

b 




g 


§ 




§ 


§ 




s 


£ 


CO 


8 8 3 


8 


Q 


t ai «i 

8 fc 8. 


r^ 


to 


CD 

to 




8 5- 


$ 



J888t 


8 


CO S 


5 


8 


§ 


CD d d CD oi 

s Jin 


CD 

8. 


8 8 

▼ CM 


I 


£ 


k 


8 & -" 


O) 


a 


s 


CM 


N 
CM 


8 2 8 SS 8 


s 


8 P 


8 


§ 


? 


•o ► o> o © <6 

pi i s 


CD 


8 ? 

O t» 


8 

CD 


g 


1 


8 • 8" =" 

to 


S 


d r>^ 

8 $ 




cm" 


oi 


8 


8 




8 




8 


to 
P 


to 




d 




d 


8 


8 










8 2 8 S5 8 


8 


8 P 


8 


? 


s 


d o> d « to 

§ CD CO 

to « to 


8 


8 ? 

O K- 


8 




s 


1 


• 8" ^ 


i 


a 




cm" 


oi 


▼ cm o oi r» 

*- — O to ▼ 


8 


8 S 


8 


8 


8 


148,394 

8,629 

300. 

648,018 
12,898 


s 

c\ 

CD 
CD 


8 S 
P* 5 


i 

oi 


8 
8 


a 

8 
8 




8 




8 




8 




ci 




d 




d 


o 2 2 8 


8 


!£ 8 


to 


8 


8 


73,138 
8,629, 

640,816, 
11,761 


i 


8 9 
ll 


i 

I 


d 

8 
8 


Oi 

8 
8 




8 


g 


8 




8 




O 


8 

o 

1 


8 

o 

1 




d 




8 


8 


8 




8 




d 


CO 

8 


IT 
CO 

8 




d 


8 8 ? a 


3 


$ 8 


8 




8 


255 

300. 
202 

137 


to 

s 


6 8 

to T 


8 




d 


IS * - 


8 


II 


2 







8 


CO CO 


CD 


O CD 


^ 


©» 


co oi 


to 


z 


o 


r«." 

CM 




s 


8 


8 8 


O) 


•»— 


o g 


N 


8 


£ 


S" 


r^ 


8 
8 

d 


8 


8 8 


01 


■*- 


O jg 


N 


8 


s 


S' 


t»" 


8" 


8 


co a 
o to 


Jo 


d 


co oi 


CO 






V 


<o 


CO «- 


N 


s 


CD 


8 

d 


p 


8 « 


£ 


v' 


CO *- 


oi 


io 


» 8 


s 


8" 


to 


p 

8 

d 

8 

d 


8 


8 S 


8 


i 


d | 


8 


r»" 


oi 


o 



* te- 



rn 

z 
u. 




68 



8 



■ i 

8 



i 






8888 88 

to 8 8 o o o 
of r«-' 

8 



8 
§ 



8 8 

o o 



8 8 

8 8 

o o 

cm ▼ 

8 8 

8 8 

o o 

CM V 



8 8 8 

6 o d 

8 8 8 

8 8 w " 



8 8 8 
§88 

o o o 

8 §" a" 

cm T 

8 8 8 
§88 

8 o o 

8" ? 5" 

CM <«■ 

8 8 8 
§88 

Boo 

* i i 

8 8 

8§ 
tfg 



# j£ jS # jfi # 
<* O CO Q o to 



* o 



e « n 
co ▼ io 



8 



8 



8 



8 



88888888888888888888 
§8888888888888888888 

OoooOoiooooOooooOoooo 

* $ 8 § g g g I I" S * I §' I g S I' § g f 



8 8 8 8 8 

8 8 8 8 8 

o o o o o 

S 8 f i s 



§888 

io o 6 o 

N- O O O 

S 8 8" IB 



8 8 8 8 8 

8d d d d 

tf> Q e o 

uo cm o o o 

g S 8 8 8 

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 

o d d d d d 6 

8o o lf> o o o 

O IO CM O O O 

8" 8 g S 8 8 8" 



8 8 8 
8 8 8 

O O O 

at 



888gX888 2 ? g 



8888888888888 

doddoddddo 

- Oo0otf>0000 



8 



o8oiocm888o888 



$888§X28?82? 



8888888888888 

ddoQQdoooddoo 

OoOOif)OOOOOC>o 

oooiacmOoooooo 

8 8" 8 g ?" 2 8 ? 8 2" ? 



8 



8 8 8 8 

8 8 8 8 

o_ o_ o_ o_ 

I 8 cf 5 



8 8 8 8 

d d d d 

8 8 8 8 



CO 



8 



8 8 8 8 

d d d d o 

8 8 8 8 8 

2" £ 8" £ 5" 



100,000.00 
20,000.00 

155.000.00 

232.500.00 
54,250.00 
35,000.00 

180,000.00 
55,000.00 


10,000.00 
40,000.00 
65,000.00 
36,000.00 

326,000.00 


88888888 

dddddddd 

O000|f>000 

ooomCMooS 


8 8 8 8 

odd d 

8 8 8 8 



8 8 8 

odd 

8 8 8 

? £ ? 

8 8 8 

odd 

8 8 8 

? £ ?" 

8 8 8 

odd 

8 8 8 

? £ ? 

8 8 8 

odd 

8 8 8 
S" 9 ?" 

8 8 8 

odd 

8 8 8 

8" S ? 



8 | 



iSHiiliiiiilliiiili 

tC«»««IOIlill)triVTt«TTII)nil) 



§.§§[&&$. j|j|§y§y^£i.§i.§i§f^il§ 



8 



g 



8 



8 



9 



8 



8 



8 



o o o o o o 



g£ 



: || I I I 

^■ — ^^OOOOOOOOO^^ — — OOO 

c^$ , &&$'$'5'?5'&P : '^'^ , ^' >> ~ > » = ' > ' 

'-OOOOOOOOOOOO'-'-'-'-'-'-'- 



UJ 

d 

I- 

5 



8 2 8 8 S 8 

I — • — t — • — • — i — 

5 5 5 5 5 5 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



8 8 fe S S < fc « 8" 5 S $ 8" < $ g < fe" § 3" 

t-H-l-t-l-l-t-l-»-l-l-l-»-(-|OIOl-Kt-t- 

55555555555555<<5555 



UJ 

o 
8 



CO 



t- J £ 



is 1 



s 

5 i 5 

CO X CO 



a 

s a S i 

Q a a 



o o 

z z 

a n 

z z 



CO CO 

S 5 






i- z 



5 



o e> o o 
z z z z 

# Q 5 Q Q 2 2 
Z Z Z Z g g 

22££oo 
tf tf tf tf 



z z z 



^SSMSsEfSi 






89 



s 



8 

i 



M 

ft s 



CD 



S 



88888888888 
8 8 8 g 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 

ooooooooOo>o 

8' t i * 8 " ( s § § 5 S 



8 8 

8 8 

o o 

8 g 



8 8 8 8 8 

O Q 6 O Q 

8 6 O to O 

o q s o 

8 8 8 15 5 



8 8 8 8 8 8 

do do q d 

8 8 8 8 8 S 

S 8" 8 8" | 8 



8 8 8 8 8 

odd do 

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 

OS 8 8 8 8 



8 8 
8 ° 



8 8 8 8 8 8 

d d o o d ° 

8 8 8 8 8 8 

JO jf IO IO JO IO 

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 

d d o o d o Q 

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 
jG S »" »' 8" £ 2 

CM 

88888888 

ddddoddd 

88888888 

- 8 S lc " ^ 8 S' 2" 

88888888 

ddddoddd 

88888888 



8 8 

8 (£> 



8 

d 

8 
8 



8] 8888888 

°> ~ o C fi Q C 
"~ tf> O o o o o 
r»-_ ci o o_ o_ o_ o_ 

P- S 8 s ? 8 8 s 

Ol CI CI ■- »- V 



8 8 
§§ 

9 



8 8 

d d 

8 8 



8 8 8 

d odd 



ui 

i 



lllllllllll 

VttCIOTIDIOietCt 



I 

8 8 8 8 

S 8" r ? 

8 8 8 8 8 

d d d d d 

8 8 8 8 8 

£ 8" 8 S ? 

8 8 8 8 8 

d d d d d 

8 8 8 8 8 

£ 8 8 '* ? 

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 

*i <r o 6 d o 6 

H88888 

g a" s? 8 8" s ? 

8 8 8 8 8 

m t^ d o d 

25888 

'" 8" £ 8 8" 



1 I I I 5 - * 

e K a R. a> ci ci 

« « t t ri >) >) 



8 8888888 



§ 



§888888 

o o_ o io_ o_ o_ o_ 
8 §5 3 $ 8 8 n. 

CI CI ft CI CI CI 





8 8 




d d 




8 8 




8" 8" 




8 8 8 




odd 




8 8 8 




8" 8 8 




8 8 8 




odd 




8 8 8. 




8 8 8 




8 8 8 




odd 




8 8 8 




8 8 8 


8 


8 8 8 


d 


odd 


8 


8 8 8 


? 


8 8 8 


8 


8 8 8 


d 


odd 


8 


8 8 8 


?* 


8" 8" 8" 



8 8 8 8 

8 8 8 8 

8> O O O 

8 § f 8 



8 8 

d d 

8 8 

id' to" 



8 8 

d d 

8 8 

IO IO 



8 8 

d d 

8 8 

to IO 



8 8 

d d 

8 8 

IO~ IO 



8 8 

d d 

8 8 

si e* 



8 



8 



§ $ ? I 8 8 8 

t o « e V io id 



3 8 



IISSSSSsS 



5 g £ 



0000»-*-«-*- 



8 8 § §[ § ^ J 

" — O O O o o 

^ & S £ & r ** 

o o o o o »■ *- 



I III III 

1 1 £ I > > > 



d 

I- 

5 



CO N- 



0> v) 0> ©> ^ ^.r 0) Ok O* O* O* O) O* w O* 

2 8" £ 8" 8" ? ? f f 8* 8" 

i-t-t-t-t-t->-~~t-t- 

55555552255 



fc" t 5? 8" 8" s 8 
►—•—»—»—»—►—»— 

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 



*8 



2 » w » & 2 ™ 

7- I- * £ « _- Tr 



8 8 S5 



fe 5 8 

5- ►- 



5 5 2 < 2 5 5 



8 




O D O O 

z z z z 





Q Q Q Q 

z z z z 


TO 


£222 


g 


tf tf tf tf 


Q 


B « 8 8 


i 

& 


iiii 


1- 
eo 


1 9 9 9 



8 



5 I 

? 9 | 
8§i 



a a 



8 



cr a 

0. OL 

5 2 

££ 

Q Q 

CO CO 



F 

» 3 

is 



O O 

z z 

o o 

~ z 



5 5 5 5 

F F F F p p 
3 2 2 3 n! CC 



z z 

Q o 

•- »- 

55 55 

3 3 



8888s 888 

<<<<zz<< 

ooooSSoo 

519 9 



90 



g 



8 

i 



o 

8 



E :■ 



oi 

II 

UI I 

§ 3 

I K 

& § 

t- 
m 



8 8 
§1 

8" ie 



8 

d 

8 

8" 

8 

d 

8 

8" 

8 8 

d d 

8 8 

8 £ 





LU 


# * 




i 


§§ 

CD © 


z 

g 




|| 


-J 


^ S 1 






o o 




UJ 






d 


11 




i- 






5 


ES 

TY ART 55, 
ART 11, 




LU 

3 


t- _i 




8 


o « ... 






PUBLIC FA 
PARKING F 
EJH REUSE 



8 



8 



8 



<6 K> 




III 

O »- »- 

fiy ^ ^ 

o o o 


i 



Ul 



w w 3 

s a h 

-J -J 2 

fe fe | 

as ft o 



UJ 

» 
o 



i 



51 

to <o 

a* 

CL 

2 



8 8 8 8 8 


81 8 


8" 


,000 

000 
,000 
350 
,000 


8 8" 

w o 


8 

o 


§ § § * £ 


§ i 




r> «- of 


n 






8 


8 




d 


d 




8 


8 




d 


d 


8 


8 


8 


§ 


§ 


d 


8 


| 




8 8 8 8 


8 8 


8 


,000 

,000 
,850 

.000 


8 g 

09 8 


d 

8 


§ 8 • 8 


1 8 


8' 


8 8 8 8 


8 8 


8 


,000 

,000 
,700 
,000 


t. i 


d 

8 


S 8-5 


| * 


g 


8 8 8 8 8 


8 8 


8 


,000 
,000 
,000 
700 
000 


8 § 


d 

8 


520, 
100, 
275 
17, 
170, 


S * 


g 


8 8 8 8 8 


8 8 


8 


,000 
,000 
,000 
,700, 

,000, 


1 § 


d 

8 


|8 g & 8 


s * 


g 


8 8 8 8 8 


8 8 


8 


,000 
,000 
,000, 
,700, 
,000, 


1 8 


d 

8 


1 8g fc g 


i * 


£ 


8 8 8 8 8 


8 8 


8 


,000 
,000 
,000 
,700, 
,000 


§ § 


d 

8 


«8§ fc 8 


§ * 


S 



a> 

8 
S 



91 




I 



o 

8 
i 

8 

8 



8 O Q O O 

o o o o io 

8 8 ? £ 8 8 

n in ia i S i»» 

» W p> ,- O Q 

* « 8 S 

r>" 



CO 
01 

co 6 

•- v 

t» O) 



CO 
CO 

2 
to 
eo" 



8 8 



o c\i 



8 8 

<>> to 

oi" r> 

io cp 



8 8 



8 o 8 8 
IS IS 8" S S 

•»- v o io to 

8 



o 



8 8 

IO p 

p © 



8 8 
If 

* 8 



8 8 8 88 

5<n 8 8 8 
a tD A Id 



IO O O O Q Q 

ft o o o O ft 

O iP !G !C P *> 

W Ol ft ft * fc 

"f in •- « « h 



to 

m ~ ** 



CM 

0» Of ff> 

2 5 



8 



8 



8 



8 8 8 

V to to" 



8 1288888888888^28 

"i I *". X ". "I '. ' ft tO O) ft, CM ft_ ■* lO S> 

in" oT »-" 5 of '-" p oT io" »-" b io oi io" n d « 
oi to a> ft cm cm oi cbcnocontpo>to<>> 

•—« V •»- Ol 10 9 * i- 



toOOO OoO IO O 

5 8 8 8 £ £ £ § fe 

IO S B ft N « « X.® 



o 

IO 

-" £ s t 



8 io £ 8 !o 

ID N B f) ft 



g£ 



8 8 8 t 8 

« » IO 



r«* -t 



IO 



•i- ft" CD 

*" 8 



8 O Q 
OOO 

£888 

tO O T to 



» *i t. °» 

to X 



8 Q Ol Q Q Q 
. IO ft CD O p ft 

§ s ii I? i % 

to oj » »- ft" r> 



O O O Q 

o o o o 

8 8 8 le" 

o i O) ^r 

-' o oi e 

»- o 



8 8 8 io 

8 ? $ $ 

& 8 9 S 

8 8 8 5 

^ 5 £ 2 

J ° w ^ 



8888^888 



— z: <*> f» 
o» p v a 

io * t e 



S^SKS "2S 88 



88888888 


o o o S IO o o 


lOOOCMIOOIAQI 
K<N'-OOION-«0 


725 
9©5 
665 
355 
547 
111 
401 


«ou«iotc» 


*- cm *■ •— o> o> o 



a 



8S82888«g8ie8?|8S^o'g88 

0»»«'-»Cl'-C«oftoftC , -*OB( l i 

-" 8" *" S 55 S 5 8" 8" * w " S 8 :: 8 g 8" 8 t 8 



88888oi8888888)C8)C88S 

'-(DsftOBT'-O'-BtSOI'-NftW » O 

w " 8" w " * 8 5 8 S 8 8 « S 8" 8" S ^" 8 fc «* 



5 



g g 



T O t^ CD CM f*. 

to ^ V o v io 



8ttnSonnioSn 

IDODOVOOOOOIO)'*- 

VtDtototdtoioioioVciV 



o to n- o N 

T T » T T 



to to T 
io io io 



_l Q 



ft ft ft ft ft ft 

I I I I I * 

CO CD K K N- *- 

o o o o o «- 

CD CD c6 ft ft ft 

» O) CD O) <*> O) 



IO CD IO IO < O 
OJ »- Ol IO »- Ol 



it tx tr c c tt 
<<<<<< 



I^AmjKKftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft 



IO to to IO 

5 fc' ^ s 

•- o o o 



Illlllll- 

OOOOOOOO'- 



Ee 



I^OCDSSStDftftS 

a»o»e»cAO)0)o»o»c»o> 



occroctririititrtEiitr 
<<<<<<<<<<< 



ft ft CD 
« « ft 



< < < 



II 

< < 



S » 



(X IX 

< < 



8 ft- 

09 0) 



tr tx 
< < 



LU 
CO 



O 
O 

•- tr 
m co 



z 
5oj 


tx 


11 B 

Ms 

S 5 S 


BT 

SERVO 

NDS 


o a n 
i i i 


Ul HI O 
O (X CD 



to o. u. 

z 

2 



(9 (9 

z z 

Q O 

z z 

3 3 

li. LL 

U) LU 

IX IX 

z z 



< CO CO 00 



B B E Si „ 



E E 



< < 



CO 

<o 5 

(9 a 

z I- 

w S 

|| 

(9 fi 

z IX 

in i- 



<0 



z z 



z 

LU 

2 

O 

tx 

y| I g g 

z fii z 2 
§ ° f § 
< ? < < 



LU LU 

cr cl 



CO CO 

z z 



E Q S 

i— t— i- 

< < < 

5 ? 5 



92 



I- DC 

CO UJ 

UJ CD 

5 g 



Z 
I 

:- a 

Q 
HI 

5 

00 






o 

s 

I 

8 
8 



888888888 
S2!8?3«855; 



f- ip 

CM N 

8 g 



^ 8 8 cm o S 8 n 5 o 



8 8 

*- OD 
»-" CM" 



CD CM t- 
CO CO 



IO 

^ » «j » 

co r» *■ co 

V V O <M 

«" in" t 



o>" co" 



0)0 

ie g 2 

«- IB CD 

IO ~ K 

8 • 



o 8 

(£> o" 


75.900.00 
5,272.28 
16.973.00 


o 8 

8" t 

(0 o> 
N CM" 


85.100.00 
9,122.80 
16.973.00 


8 8 


818 



2 81 8 8 P 

OD «0 ^ CI 9 

a? co" sf cm » 



OOOQQQOOOO 

oooooiooocho 

88Sg82888P 

t" k V o t" r«-* » to" to 



OIOOOQQQQQOQ 

ocMoooOiooOtoo 

N » 09 T 6 CI 01 •- e * CI 

-" S cm 7 8 8" 52 



n ic a v 



££888888828 

p s « g i n g g u 

ei io b t" j <■ 

— *- CO CM CM CM 



O N « T 



8 



IS 



"~ °> Q Q Q CD eo 

to o> p o q r-. r-^ 

CO CO Q O O CD CO 

CO 01 OJ C Q Ot IO 

CD o •-. 6 © II) « 

t" V" IO CD — " CD CM 

i- — CM — ^r CM 



2 8 



CO CO 

CO »- 

2 8 

CM CD 

ID" t- 



8 CD CD 

OD CO 

6 to a 

id" CO 



O O O l> 

S S 8 8 B 

*- CD IO CO CO 

CM CM" •»-" tO IO 



o o o o 

8 8 8 8 8 

CO IO CM O P, 

oi ia cT n a 



to 


3 


o o o 
o o o 


o 

IO 


8 


8 


8 


IN 8 8 
IO CM 0» 


CM 

T 

i>» 


8 


co 




CO CD CM 


r^ 


CM 


8 


to 

O) 


O Q O 
O O O 


to 


8 


8 


8 


8 § 8 


8 

o 


CM 

s 



*- CO T *■ ▼ ▼ — 



3 



8 



8 



8 



ie 



p 8 8 




8 


s 


15 


3 


1 Si! 


I 


§ 


CO 


<r> 

3 


OJ 


° ? 8 


0D 


cm 

o 
o 
to 
n 


<o 


S 


? 

o 
o 

d 

o 
o 

to 

CO 




CO 


8 


CM 


CM 


8 




5 8 

CO f>- 


5 


8 


I 






CM 


IO 


8" 


8 


IO 


to 


8 


CD 


O 


<3 


K 


CM 


CO 


*■ 


IO 


8 
p 


IO 


1 


8 


1 


I 


*~ 


to" 


cm" 


<o" 


o" 


8 


o o 

o IO 


CO 


8 


CO 

to 


8 


3 


IP O) 

eg ■«■ 


t 


i 


£ 


8 


8 


to CM 


o 


»- 


T ^_ 


CO 


~ co" 


o>" 


cm" 


K 


^- 


3 






■" 






o o 

O IO 


ie 


8 


o 


te 


o 


ie s 

CD CO 


2 


$ 


8 

o 


p 

<* 


ti 


V to 


CM 


cm" 


a>" 


T- 


8 












o o 

O IO 


CO 


8 


to 

CM 


8 


8 


8 fc 


£ 


t 


to 


a 


£ 


*- IO 


*~ 


o> 


O) 


*■ 


CD" K 


to" 


cm" 


CD" 


cm" 


8 




*■ 


*" 




- 


8 8 io 


8 


8 


s 


8 


8 


920 
,262. 
681. 


8 

to 


i 


i 


8 


8 


»- o> 


0» 


cm" 


o" 


CO 


15 


8 8 8 


o 


8 


CD 
CO 


IO 
CM 


3 


760 
,387 

,825. 


8 


1 


8 


8 


i 


« T » 


8" 


IO 


io" 


r-" 


8 



IS 



S § 



JB a« # a« # 

O S <o - B> 

O V *- CO OD 

- n T O N 

to to to io V 



# rf £ jfi # 

B 8 8 8 o 



NPP99999999 
'-OOOOOO'-'-O'- 



ItiSSS 



8 tl $£ & S 

O CM O 



tO IO CO f«- CD CM CM 
to to V V CO IO IO 


tO CO ▼ CO IO CM CM 

V to to to ▼ to IO 


7/15/86 

7/15/86 

07/01/92 

07/01/92 

07/01/93 

11/01/94 

11/01/94 


12/15/76 
07/15/88 
08/09/89 
08/01/90 
1 1/15/93 
11/01/94 
11/01/94 



3 

CO 



£co8SS<»o;88S8 
1 I "". *". ". '".'".8 8 -. -. 

O) OD CD cmco*- n V V 4> o 
'-O'-COCOVTCOCOCMCM 
I— •— I— >— I— t— t— ^-»J-|— |— 

trcLcrccircrcECMCMaa: 
<<<<<<<<<<< 



II 



u o 


1- 


o 


co 


a. 


¥ 


a. 

UJ 


1 
a 


< 



DODO 
z z z z 



Q O 

z z 

LL 



UJ UJ UJ UJ 

a a a a: 

8 i!! « 8 

z z z z 

«c sc < < 



cocoQcococococo<<<< 



w w ft a a O) O) 

09 CI OI Q CI Q Cl 

N ^ B Cl" (V •-" O" 

*- *- •» IO IO IO IO 

•— •— »— t — •— ■ i— •— 

k a. tr tr a. tr tr 
<<<<<<< 

o 

CO 

< 



IH 



Q O 

f- OC OC 

tf «r a: 

co tr tr 



IX C IT £ 

oil J 
2 S S uj o 



'I 

tr O 

m tr 



r^- CD CO CD CD ch Co 

2 2 ~ to" to" 2 2 

. . CM 5 5 . - 

£ O jj jC jC ▼ CM 

V CM CO CO OD IO tO 

i- t- to ~ ~ *- y- 

tr cr cm cm cm tr tr 
<<<<<<< 



15 5 5 

i- i- i- i- 

B B 8 55 

r) D D 3 

8888 

< < < < 

Q D a a 

z z z z 

5 5 5 5 



O (9 

liii 

3 3 1-1- 

& Hi 5 5 
tr tr 3 3 

8888 

z z < < 

< < Q Q 

S S 5 5 

< < _) -b 



93 



co 

1= 

LU 
CO 

D 
I 
O 

CO 





y 


of 


D 


£ 


Q 
U) 


8 


5 


z 


CO 


< 


1- 


b S 

z Q 



i- cr 

LU CD 

5 3 

I z 

I 

8 

cr 

i 
i- 
o 

LU 
CO 

a 



I 



8 

i 

8 

o 

8 
i 

8 
8 



8 
8 






8 

09 



8 IS 

2 8 

35 o 

CD C0~ 



o 

ID 

oi 
<o 
o 

<N 



8 8 12 8 



8§ 



2 8 

CO O 
O CO 



8 



8 



7 $ IO 

CO o 



8 IS 



8 IS 8 

8 m 

8" • B 

8 S8 

o oi oi 

8 8" 5" 



8 8 8 



I 1 I 1 
8 «" g 



ie 



8 



8 8 8 8 

t i 6 n 

01 C N O 

cm r- co 

88 88 

§ i I § 



88 8 8 

I i. 8 $ 

of O ^» <* 

e « o n 



ie 



8 8 

8 

ID 

5? 



o 
o 

ci 



o 

o 



g 






8 



8 



8 

to 
Id 
co" 



09 



8" 
▼ 

8 

8 

o 

? 

8 

8 
•. 

8 

ID 



s 



o o 

CD CD 



to ot 

«D ID 



CO 






ID ID 



8o § 



cr 

< 



cr cr 
< < 



LU 


5 fc 


3 

CO 


£ 5 




< £ « 




S: a d 




lis 




2 a ui 




94 



o 
o 
6 

o 
o 

o 

o 

CM 



o 
q 

b 

o 
o 

o" 

o 

CM 



CM 

l-» 
CD 

<o 

CO 



I CM 

I I s : 

I eo 

I <o 

I P. 



o> 



Q 

Z 
D 
u. 

Z 

o 

US 

UJ u 

WD.* 

3 2 2 

So? 

^ ** o 
ioOn 

CO Z uj 

< < z 

pi 

z ^ uj 

u- a < 
O uj uj 

2 CO > 
> UJ 

H O 

CO 
CO 

>■ 



a 

z 

u. 

a. 
m 

CO 
UJ 

oc 



c 

a> 
a 
2 
c 

5 p> 
o o> 
> o> 

A - 

*! 

at a. 



o 
«* 

E 

2 
u. 



a 
o 

c 
o 



5 E 

z >.- 
D XJ - 

Z • a. 

' < 



</> 



o o o 
p p p 

O) i- 1 o 

<D CM i- 

* P. tN L 

T- CO 



« 

.Js • 

si s 

s.« s. 

UJ gUJ 

HI 

OLO 



o 

o 
6 
o 
o 

o 

o 

CM 



< 
CO 

z 

UJ 

a 

2 
O 

o 



CM 

00 

<o 

CO 

oT 



I CM 

I eo 

I <o 

I » 

I » 

I "~ 
I 





CO 



o 
J2 



0. 



H 

Is 

w a 
£ 



O 

a co 

va-j 
o o o 



o © 
£f 

* 

>. o 

■O T3 

C a 
o 

c 
S 



a 

c 

1 

« 

2 

a 

a. 
5 



95 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1994 



EMPLOYEES PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS 
TRUST AND AGENCY ACCOUNTS 



7,787,563.42 
395,810.07 



REFUNDS 

GROUP 1 

MOTOR VEHICLE REFUNDS 

WATER RATES AND SERVICES 

SEWER CHARGES 

OTHER DEPARTMENTAL REVENUES 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 

FINES AND FORFEITS 



27,725.72 

10,894.36 

7,274.78 

1,539.00 

314.70 

60.00 



GROUP II 

DMM FACILITIES RENTAL 1 ,1 20.00 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 1 1 ,845.84 



GROUP III 

REAL ESTATE REFUND 
PERSONAL PROPERTY REFUNDS 



758,517.56 
1,925.22 



821,217.18 



REVOLVING/GRANTS 



3,449,288.13 



MISCELLANEOUS 
PETTY CASH 

TEMPORARY BORROWING 
TAILINGS 

TAX TITLE EXPENSES 
GUARENTEE DEPOSITS 
STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 
INVESTMENT MATURITIES 



1,525.00 

3,122,124.00 

142.71 

16,378.28 

13,377.00 

1,078,004.18 

19,728,737.05 23,960,288.22 



36,414,167.02 



96 



TOWN OFANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

January 1. 1995 



ARTICLE PROJECT NAME AUTHORIZATION 

ART 18. 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 1.160.000.00 

ART 46. 1992 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 443,000.00 

ART 2A. 1992 SCHOOL CONST/RECONST 400.000.00 

ART 46. 1 993 WATER PUMP STATION PUMP REPAIR 1 50.000.00 

ART 62. 1993 CONSERVATION 730.000.00 

ART4A 1993 HIGH SCHOOL PLANT/PLAY FIELDS 500.000.00 

ART 20- 1 . 1 994 SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION *OVE RRIDE 29.552.000.00 

ART 20-2. 1994 SCHOOL MEDIA *OVERRIDE 2.000.000.00 

ART 21 . 1994 SCHOOL PLANNING 1 .000.000.00 



35.935.000.00 



97 



WATER AND SEWER ANNUAL REPORT 



FY94 
SEWER 



FY94 
WATER 



BUDGETARY BASIS- TAX RECAPITULATION 






FY 1994 BUDGET AMOUNT 


2,081,000 


4,820,000 


FY 1994 COLLECTIONS (Detail below) 


2,122,877 


4,836,242 


SURPLUS/ ( DEFICIT ) 


41,877 


16,242 



CASH BASIS 






REVENUES 






Rate Collections 


1,986,639 


4,658,174 


Water Service Lines 




29,903 


Water Connection Fee 




63,966 


Water Testing Fees 




5,550 


Liens Added To Taxes 


43,610 


64,094 


Betterment Assessments 


65,628 


9,040 


Committed Interest 


27,000 


5,515 


Refunds 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES 








2,122,877 


4,836,242 






Direct Costs: 






Personal services 


147,198 


797,691 


Ordinary Maint. 


69,453 


1,025,678 


Sewer Assessment 
TOTAL DIRECT COSTS 


647,782 





864,433 


1,823,369 


Indirect Costs: 






Vehicle Maint. 


22,179 


66,538 


DPW Admin. 


12,659 


60,483 


Gen Admin, and Fin. 


20,566 


123,398 


Maint . Admin 


3,393 


8,482 


Motor Vehicle Ins. 


5,999 


17,996 


Comprehensive/Liability Ins. 


6,822 


78,447 


Workmen ' s Comp . 


16,081 


55,069 


Retirement 


45,384 


158,843 


Health Ins. 


17,944 


76,932 


Engineering 
TOTAL INDIRECT COSTS 


23,331 


38,066 


174,358 


684,254 


Debt Service: 






Loan Interest 


303,720 


783,078 


Loan Principal 


484,350 


1,188,000 


BAN Interest/Issue expense 
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 
SURPLUS/ ( DEFICIT ) 


27,843 


50,291 


815,913 


2,021,369 


1,854,704 


4,528,992 


268,173 


307,250 



98 









i6 c ' 




ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 11, 


12, 13, 1994 




WARRANT 
ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


ACTION 
TAKEN 


APPR. BY 
ATTY. GEN 


1 


Election 






2 


Election of Officers not 
required by ballot 






3 


Town Budget transfers 


Approved 




4 


Salaries of elected officials 


Approved 




5 


Grant program authorization 


Approved 




6 


Road Contracts 


Approved 




7 


Free cash 


Approved 




8 


Unexpended appropriations 


Withdrawn 




9 


Chapter 90 road easements 


Approved 




10 


Unpaid bills 


Withdrawn 




11 


Town Report 


Approved 




12 


The Budget 


Approved 




13 


Vocational High School Grant - 
Statute Acceptance 


Approved 




14 


Property Tax exemptions 


Approved 




15 


Rescinding of bond authorizations 


Approved 




16 


Community Services Revolving Account 


- Approved 





17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 

23 

24 
25 
26 

27 

28 



Statute Acceptance 

Community Development & Planning 
revolving account - 

Statute Acceptance 

Enterprise Fund - Water 
Statute Acceptance 

Enterprise Fund - Sewer 
Statute Acceptance 



Approved 

Approved 
Approved 



School Construction & Computer Network Approved 

School Building - Architectural Fees Approved 

Portion of Alderbrook Road Defeated 
Eminent Domain 

Site Plan review Defeated 
Zoning Bylaw 

Special Education Funds - FY94 Budget Approved 

Town Meeting warrant Defeated 

Temporary Signs - Approved 
Zoning Bylaw 

Banner Approval Approved 
Zoning Bylaw 

Land gift - River Road Withdrawn 



June 7, 1994 
June 7, 1994 



99 



190 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 11. 12. 13. 1994 



29 

30 
31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 
43 

44 

45 

46 

47 
48 

49 
50 
51 
52 

53 
54 



Sunday Sale of alcoholic beverages 
Statute Acceptance 

Free Cash 

Teachers early retirement - 
Statute Acceptance 

Street Acceptance - 
Nollet Drive 

Street Acceptance 

Cobblestone Lane 

Street Acceptance 

Portion of Windemere Drive 

Street Acceptance 

Robinswood Way 

Street- Acceptance 
Doyle Circle 

Street Acceptance 
Dairy Lane 

Street Acceptance 
Pauline Drive 

Street Acceptance 
Harper Circle 

Pedestrian Regulations 
Town Bylaw 

Licensing Authority/Taxes 
Town Bylaw 

Procedures on alarms and false alarms 

Convenience Stores 
Zoning Bylaw 

Convenience Stores 
Zoning Bylaw 

Disposal of Canine waste 
Town Bylaw 

New growth limit 

Record Board of Selectmen meetings 

Town Meeting Reconsideration 
Town Bylaw 

Record Finance Committee meetings 

Road Repair 

Bridge Repair 

Smoking and sale of tobacco 
Town Bylaw 

Water Main construction 

Land Acquisition - Pearson Street 



Approved June 7, 1994 

Defeated 
Approval 



Not Laid Out 

Approved 

Not Laid out 

Not Laid Out 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Defeated 

Approved June 7, 1994 

Withdrawn 
Defeated 

Defeated 

Approved June 7, 1994 

Defeated 
Defeated 
Defeated 

Defeated 
Approved 
Approval 
Approval 



June 7, 1994 



Approval 
Approval 



100 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 11. 12. 13. 1994 



i9 



55 Land Acquisition - Moraine Street 

56 Ratify expenditure from Conservation 
Fund - Article 24, 1985 Annual Town 
Meeting 

57 Change of dog licensing renewal dates 

Town Bylaw 

58 Local Education Fund Contribution 

59 Rezone SC District 

60 Right of Way width 

61 Elimination of affidavit for site 
plan - 

Zoning Bylaw 

62 Management Audit 

63 Land swap - Genetics Institute 

64 Town Meeting - Closure 

65 Sewer line construction - River Road 

66 Dog license fees 

67 Land Acquisition - South Main Street 

Town Bylaw 



Withdrawn 
Approved 

Approved June 7, 1994 

Withdrawn 

Approved June 7, 1994 

Defeated 

Approved June 7, 1994 

Defeated 

Approved 

Defeated 

Defeated 

Approved June 7, 1994 

Withdrawn 



101 



i 92 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11,12.13, 1994 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 28. 1994 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 7, 1994 the 
Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Elections and 
Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. 
All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, 
Seven, Eight, are to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High 
School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF MARCH, 1994 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the 
following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each school house and in no less than five other 
public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by 
publication . in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald F. Ford 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. 
The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. The 
polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock 
P.M. 

The total number of ballots cast was 2,832, viz: 

Prec. 1 -346 Prec. 2 -365 Prec. 3 -333 Prec. 4 -435 
Prec. 5 -437 Prec. 6 -327 Prec. 7 -274 Prec. 8 -315 



8 MODERATOR FOR ONE YEAR 



271 278 242 316 302 238 204 220 James D. Doherty 2071 

56 69 75 93 108 67 50 74 John Doyle 592 

19 18 16 26 27 22 19 21 Blanks 168 

1 All Others 1 



8 SELECTMEN - 

TWO FOR THREE YEAR8 



220 257 230 289 265 214 175 215 James M. Barenboim 1865 
251 267 248 303 321 235 201 233 Larry L. Larsen 2059 

221 206 187 278 286 205 167 181 Blanks 1731 

1 2 5 1 All Others 9 



1CT2 



I / J 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11.12.13. 1994 



_8 SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 
TWO FOR THREE YEARS 



152 190 152 186 178 162 102 141 Susan T. Dalton 1263 

149 130 127 156 155 131 115 116 Susan E. Jenkins 1079 

101 93 82 105 67 83 71 74 David A. Birnbach 676 

85 67 87 88 91 49 63 103 William Josephson 633 

116 161 136 222 284 159 129 137 Lloyd J. Willey 1344 

89 89 82 113 99 70 68 59 Blanks 669 



12345678 GR. LAW. REG. VOC. TECH 

H.8. DISTRICT COMM 
ONE FOR THREE YEARS 

257 270 255 302 311 227 192 241 Joseph Gleason 2055 

89 95 78 133 126 100 82 74 Blanks 777 



8 ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 



233 261 246 303 283 213 179 204 James A. Cuticchia 1922 

79 59 55 70 83 54 50 59 Rolande A. Werner 509 

34 45 32 62 71 60 45 51 Blanks 400 

1 All Others 1 



_8 TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE 
SCHOOL FIVE FOR THREE YEARS 



208 198 206 209 209 166 143 183 Earl G. Efinger 1522 

207 199 205 246 233 188 150 187 Donna C. Ellsworth 1615 
205 192 207 212 214 172 147 192 Robert A. Finlayson 1541 
217 212 225 234 232 183 155 191 Joan M. Lewis 1649 

208 190 201 204 213 177 153 189 John R. Petty 1535 
685 834 621 1070 1084 749 622 633 Blanks 6298 



After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said 
meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of Chapter 39, Section 20 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 11, 1994, at 7:00 P.M., 
at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said 
Andover . 



103 



194 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11, 1994 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1692 voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 
7:00 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Paul N. Pantelis, Sts. 
Constant ine & Helen Church. 



Salute to the flag was led by Gerald Silverman, Chairman, Board of 
Selectman. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 30 non-voters to the meeting 
and allow non-voters to be escorted to the non voting section 
thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading of the Warrant and return of 
service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous 
consent that the Moderator refer to the articles by number and 
subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for 
three years, two members of the School Committee for three years, 
one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years, one 
member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
School District Committee for three years, and five members of the 
Trustees of the Punchard Free School for three years. 

All the candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 
28nd. 

The polls were open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P. M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson declared the successful candidates to 
be as follows: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

James M. Barenboim Selectman for Three Years 

Larry L. Larsen 

Susan T. Dalton School Committee for Three Years 

Lloyd J. Willey 

Joseph Gleason Gr. Law. Reg. Voc. Tech. H.S. 

District Committee for Three years 

James A. Cuticchia Andover Housing Authority for Five 

Years 



ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was voted that Virginia H. 
Cole be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a 
Majority vote. 



104 



195 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1994 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts 
previously appropriated at the April 12, 1993 Annual Town Meeting 
as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
33B. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a MAJORITY vote 
that the sum of $538,000 be transferred from the following 
accounts: 

General Government - Personal Services $ 81,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 87,000 

Public Safety - Personal Services 20,000 

Library - Personal Services 10,000 

Health Insurance 300,000 

Insurance Expenses 40,000 

and be appropriated to: : 

Public Works - Other Expenses $538,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for 
the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a MAJORITY vote 
that the salaries of the elected Town Officers be established as 
follows: 

Town Moderator - $125.00 for each Annual Town Meeting 

and $30.00 for each Special Town 
Meeting except when it falls within 
the Annual Town Meeting. 

Selectmen - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

School Committee - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter 
into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds 
allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the 
U. S. Government under any State or Federal grant program. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
5 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



105 



196 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11, 1994 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Highway 
Department Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or either of 
them for the construction and maintenance of public highways in the 
Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
6 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 7. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the 
Assessors to use in free cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 1995 tax 
rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 1994 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
permit the Assessors to use $300,000 in free cash to reduce the 
Fiscal Year 1995 tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 
1994 Annual Town Meeting. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended 
appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Article 8 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to 
acquire any necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by right of 
eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
9 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Unanimous A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a sum not to exceed $10,000 to pay unpaid bills for 
which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

Article 10 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 11. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
11 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of 
money the Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations 
from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, 
including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for 
the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1994, and ending June 30, 1995. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a MAJORITY vote 
to raise and appropriate the following sums of money: 



106 



197 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 11, 1994 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Including $224,293 in 
department receipts, and 
$10,000 in Wetland filing 
fees 



$2,171,147.00 



Including $156,645 in department 

receipts and $500 

in Wetland filing fees 1,026,845.00 



Total Appropriated 



3,197,992.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

Including $53,925 from rental 

income and $35,000 from 

Cemetery interest income and 

$20,000 from sale of lots 1,736,170.00 



Including $4 3,357 from 
rental income 

Total Appropriated 



1,963,603.00 
3,699,773.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Including $100,000 from 
ambulance receipts and 
$25,226 from parking meter 
receipts 



6,310,937.00 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $80,000 for 
from ambulance receipts 
and $10,500 from 
parking meter receipts 

Total Appropriated 



503,110.00 
6,814,047.00 



7 PERSONAL SERVICES 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Including $46,500 in 
department receipts 

Total Appropriated 



1,973,711.00 

5,162,361.00 
7,136,072.00 



10 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



LIBRARY 

Including $60,317 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 

Including $21,266 from State 
Library Aid and $30,600 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 

Total Appropriated 



1,121,186.00 

471,784.00 
1,592,970.00 



107 



198 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1994 

UNCLASSIFIED 

11 COMPENSATION FUND 503,000.00 

12 RESERVE FUND 200,000.00 

A motion was made and duly seconded to amend the UNCLASSIFIED 
section of the budget # 12, RESERVE FUND from $210,000.00 to 
$200,000.00. 

The amendment was APPROVED by a Majority vote. 

Total Appropriated 703,000.00 

ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES 19,937,119.00 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 

4,484,923.00 

Total Appropriated 24,422,042.00 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

15 Total Appropriated 123,382.00 



FIXED 

16 INTEREST EXPENSE 1,917,549.00 

17 BOND REDEMPTION 3,697,700.00 

18 STABILIZATION FUND 60,000.00 

19 INSURANCE EXPENSES 925,500.00 

20 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 16,000.00 

21 RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 35,374.00 

22 RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 48,385.00 

23 CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 2,255,752.00 

24 NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 78,000.00 

25 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 3,500,000.00 

Including $50,000 from 
parking meter receipts for 
bond redemption 

Total Appropriated 12,534,260.00 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION $60,223,538.00 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 

Article 7 Free Cash For FY 95 Budget $ 300,000.00 

Article 24 FY 94 School Special Education 39.300.00 

TOTAL 339,300.00 



108 



190 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 11. 1994 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Transfer from: 

Article 3 General Government - Personal Services $81,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 87,000 

Public Safety - Personal Services 20,000 

Library - Personal Services 10,000 

Health Insurance 300,000 

Insurance Expenses 40.000 

TOTAL 538,000 



and be appropriated to: 

Public Works - Other Expenses 



$538,000 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 

Article 15 Article 1A, 1987 Special Town Meeting 

Water Treatment Plant $ 721.47 

Article 33, 1989 Annual Town Meeting 
North Street Sewer 
55,000.00 

Article 25, 1989 Annual Town Meeting 
High School Roof 120.000.00 

TOTAL 175,721.47 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



•Article 20-1 
•Article 20-2 
Article 21 
Article 50 
Article 51 
Article 53 
Article 54 



School Building Program 

School Technology Program 

School Architectural Fees 

Road Repair 

Bridge Repair 

Water Main Engineering 

Pearson Street Acquisition 



$38,500,000.00 
2,000,000.00 
1,000,000.00 
425,000.00 
150,000.00 
200,000.00 
200.000.00 



TOTAL 42,475,000.00 



* subject to Referendum Ballot Election 
held May 17, 1994 



A true record 



ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to approve the acceptance 
by the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District of (1) Chapter 70A of the General Laws relating to an 
Equal Educational Opportunity Grant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
13 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 



109 



200 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11, 1994 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 
126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 1995 for those persons who qualify for 
property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
59, Section 5. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
14 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond 
authorizations from prior Town Meetings or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to rescind the 
following unissued bond authorizations: 

Article 1A, 1987 Special Town Meeting 

Water Treatment Plant $ 721.47 

Article 33, 1989 Annual Town Meeting 

North Street Sewer 55,000.00 

Article 25, 1989 Annual Town Meeting 

High School Roof 120,000.00 

VOTE: Unanimous A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E*s for the 
purpose of establishing a Community Services revolving account for 
ticket sales, related trip expenses and youth activities for Fiscal 
Year 1995; such expenses to be funded by revenues collected from 
these activities, and to authorize the Town Manager to make 
expenditures in an amount not to exceed $100,000 for FY-1995, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
16 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E*$ for the 
purpose of establishing a Community Development and Planning 
revolving account for expenses charged for advertising or legal 
hearings and/or legal notices associated with permit applications 
and for expenses charged for health clinic fees for the Building, 
Health, Conservation and Planning divisions of said department for 
Fiscal Year 1995; such expenses to be funded by fees collected from 
applicants and clinic participants, and to authorize the Town 
Manager to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $15,000 for 
Fiscal Year 1995 or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
17 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 



110 



20 t 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11. 1994 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F!j for the 
purpose of establishing an enterprise fund for the Town's 
Department of Public Works Water Division operations or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
18 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section SBF^ for the 
purpose of establishing an enterprise fund for the Town's 
Department of Public Works Sewer Division operations or take any 
other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
19 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $40,500,000, or any 
other sum, for remodeling, reconstructing, or making extraordinary 
repairs to Andover High School, the South Elementary School, the 
Sanborn Elementary School, and for constructing, equipping and 
furnishing additions to those schools, including outside work and 
other costs incidental and related to the projects, and for 
completing the installation of wiring, computer networks and other 
technology systems at Bancroft Elementary School, West Elementary 
School, Shawsheen School, Doherty Middle School, West Middle School 
and the Central Administration Office, and for costs incidental and 
related thereto, provided that any authorized borrowing hereunder 
shall be contingent on passage of a vote at a Town election to 
exempt the amounts required to pay any authorized bonds or notes 
from the provisions of Proposition 2\, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 20 was moved as printed 
in the Warrant in the amount of $40,500,000. 

An amendment to Article 20 was moved and seconded by the School 
Committee : 

AMENDMENT A; that the sum of $38,500,000 be hereby appropriated 
for remodeling, reconstructing, or making extraordinary repairs to 
Andover High School, the South Elementary School and the Sanborn 
Elementary School, and for constructing, equipping, and furnishing 
additions to those schools, including outside work and other costs 
incidental and related to these projects, and for equipment and 
other costs related thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectman, is authorized to 
borrow not exceeding $38,500,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44 
Section 7 (3) and (3A) , of the General Laws, as amended and 
supplemented, or any other enabling authority, which may include 
Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, as amended, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor; provided, however, that this 
appropriation and authorization to borrow shall be contingent upon 
passage of a vote at a Town election to exempt the amounts required 
to pay the bonds or notes authorized hereby from the provisions of 
Proposition 2 1/2. 



Ill 



20c 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11, 1994 

and 

AMENDMENT B: that the sum of $2,000,000 be hereby appropriated for 
completing the installation of wiring, computer networks, and other 
technology systems at Bancroft Elementary School, West Elementary 
School , Shawsheen School , Doherty Middle School , West Middle 
School, and the Central Administration Office, including equipment 
and other costs related thereto, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow not exceeding $2,000,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44 Section 7 (3) and (3A) , of the General Laws, as 
amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, which 
may include Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, as amended, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; provided, however, that 
this appropriation and authorization to borrow shall be contingent 
upon passage of a vote at a Town election to exempt the amounts 
required to pay the bonds or notes authorized hereby from the 
provisions of Proposition 2 1/2. 

It was VOTED to accept Amendment A by a MAJORITY vote. 

A motion was made to move the question. 
The motion to move the question passed. 

VOTE: YES: 1537 NO: 16 A 2/3 vote required 

A motion was made for a secret ballot. The motion was defeated 
when the count was waived by the originator of the motion. 

A motion was made and duly seconded to amend the amendment 

by decreasing the sum of $38,500,000 by $800,000 to $37,700,000. 

The motion was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$38,500,000 be hereby appropriated for remodeling, reconstructing, 
or making extraordinary repairs to Andover High School, the South 
Elementary School and the Sanborn Elementary School, and for 
constructing, equipping, and furnishing additions to those schools, 
including outside work and other costs incidental and related to 
these projects, and for equipment and other costs related thereto, 
and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectman, is authorized to borrow not exceeding 
$38,500,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44 Section 7 (3) and 
(3A) , of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any 
other enabling authority, which may include Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948, as amended, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor; provided, however, that this appropriation and 
authorization to borrow shall be contingent upon passage of a vote 
at a Town election to exempt the amounts required to pay the bonds 
or notes authorized hereby from the provisions of Proposition 2 
1/2. 

VOTE: YES: 1291 NO: 247 A 2/3 vote required 

It was VOTED to accept Amendment B by a MAJORITY vote. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$2,000,000 be hereby appropriated for completing the installation 
of wiring, computer networks, and other technology systems at 
Bancroft Elementary School, West Elementary School, Shawsheen 
School, Doherty Middle School, West Middle School, and the Central 
Administration Office, including equipment and other costs related 
thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not 
exceeding $2,000,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44 Section 7 (3) 
and (3A) , of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any 
other enabling authority, which may include Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948, as amended, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 



112 



C \s ^ 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 11, 1994 

therefor; provided, however, that this appropriation and 
authorization to borrow shall be contingent upon passage of a vote 
at a Town election to exempt the amounts required to pay the bonds 
or notes authorized hereby from the provisions of Proposition 2 
1/2. 

VOTE: YES: 1087 NO: 157 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 for 
architectural and engineering services and related costs for 
remodeling, reconstructing, or making extraordinary repairs to 
Andover High School, the South Elementary School, the Sanborn 
Elementary School, and for constructing, equipping and furnishing 
additions tp those schools, including outside work and other costs 
incidental and related thereto or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$1,000,000 be hereby appropriated for architectural and engineering 
services and related costs for remodeling, reconstructing or making 
extraordinary repairs and for constructing, equipping and 
furnishing additions to Andover High School, the South Elementary 
School and the Sanborn Elementary School, including outside work 
and other costs incidental and related thereto, and that to raise 
this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not exceeding $1,000,000 under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 (21) and (22), of the General 
Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 1143 NO: 66 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a MAJORITY vote 
to adjourn at 10:45 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. on Tuesday, April 12, 1994 
at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 12, 1994 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 640 voters 
were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 
7:00 P.M. . 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 31 non-voters to the meeting 
and to escort non-voters to the non-voter section thereafter. 



113 



204 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire or take by eminent domain the fee in the 
remaining portion of Alderbrook Road beginning at the end of the 
currently accepted way and running in a northwesterly direction 
approximately 360 feet as measured along the centerline from 
Countryside Way to Sunset Rock Road, and being more fully depicted 
on Land Court Plan Number 38858A, as well as on other plans 
approved by the Town of Andover, and to accept the layout of said 
remaining portion of Alderbrook Road; and to award no damages for 
said taking; or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 22 was moved as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A motion was made to close debate and passed by a unanimous vote. 

Article 22 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Yes: 189 NO: 277 A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: No Report 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover 
Zoning By-law by deleting Section VI.Q.2.b. in its entirety and 
inserting a new Section VI.Q.2.b. as follows: 

"b. Construction of a new building or enlargement of an 
existing building as described under Section VI. Q. 2. of 
less than two thousand (2,000) square feet of gross floor 
area which would not require buffering or screening, or 
which would not require new parking areas or additional 
parking spaces, or new access to a public or private way, 
subject, however, to the following: 

1. Ten (10) copies of a plan showing all applicable 
items described under Section VI. Q. 4. shall be 
submitted to the Planning Department; 

2 . The Planning Department shall upon receipt of the 
plan forward copies to the Departments of Building, 
Health, Conservation, Public Works, Fire, and 
Police for their review and comment, and may 
conduct an interdepartmental review of the 
proposal ; 

3. Following review of the plan the Planning 
Department shall forward a Site Plan Letter of 
Approval to the Inspector of Buildings which shall 
contain any comments or recommendations which have 
been received from other Town Departments, or shall 
forward a letter to the applicant noting any 
deficiencies or additional information that may be 
needed . " 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 
23 as printed in the Warrant. 

Moderator declared the motion lost. 

Article 23 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 21 NO: Moderator declared motion lost 

A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



114 



20 r - 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to permit the Andover 
School Committee to use $175,000 in free cash to meet unanticipated 
costs, associated with special education placements, not contained 
in the FY-1994 School Department budget. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
appropriate from available funds the sum of $39,000 to the School 
Department for costs associated with special education expenses not 
contained in the FY1994 School Department budget by a MAJORITY 
vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to require that, 
henceforth, the Selectmen shall provide each voter of the Town of 
Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or 
special Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of 
such Town Meeting, and stating the time and place of holding the 
meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in compliance 
with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10; such 
document to be devoid of editorial comment, recommendations and 
statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 25 was DEFEATED 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII of 
the Andover Zoning By-law by adding a new subsection VI.B.2.f(3) 
and (4) as follows: 

"(3) Temporary signs pertaining to a candidate or ballot 

question appearing on the ballot of an election duly 
called in the Town of Andover shall require no sign 
permit and shall be allowed in all zoning districts. 
Such signs permitted by this Bylaw: 

(a) shall only be permitted on private property; 

(b) shall not exceed six (6) square feet in area per 
sign and shall not exceed in aggregate twenty-four 
(24) square feet in area per lot; 

(c) shall not be higher than three (3) feet above ground 
level ; 

(d) shall be stationary and shall not be illuminated; 

(e) shall be erected no sooner than thirty (30) 

days prior to the date of the election and shall be 
removed within three (3) days after the election. 

(4) Unless otherwise specified in this Bylaw, temporary 
signs pertaining to other non-commercial issues shall 
require no sign permit and shall be allowed in all 
zoning districts. Such signs shall be subject to the 
limitations set forth in subsection (3) (a) -(d) above." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
26 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 451 NO:21 A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen's Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



115 



206 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12 . 1994 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, 
Section VI.B.2.d. of the Andover Zoning By-law, by deleting the 
following subsection in its entirety: 

"(6) No pennants, streamers, advertising flags, spinners, or 
similar devices shall be permitted, except as allowed by the Board 
of Selectmen." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
27 be as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 433 NO: 25 A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen's Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to accept as a gift from John and Julia Tomzak to the 
Town of Andover the land and improvements at 28 River Road, 
Andover, containing approximately 10,525 square feet and as shown 
on Assessors map 127-23, subject to an approved waiver by the 
Department of Revenue of all outstanding real estate taxes and 
interest thereon or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 28 was WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of General Laws Chapter 138, Section 33B to allow the Board of 
Selectmen, as the local licensing authority, to authorize licensees 
to sell alcoholic beverages between the hours of eleven a.m. and 
twelve noon on Sundays, the last Monday in May and on Christmas Day 
or on the day following when Christmas Day occurs on Sunday or take 
any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
29 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to require the Assessors 
to use $600,000 from Free Cash to reduce the fiscal year 1995 tax 
rate. 

On petition of Dennis A. Teves and others. 

Article 30 was DEFEATED 

Finance Committee Report Disapproval 
Selectmen's Report Disapproval 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 83 of Chapter 71 of the Acts of 1993, as amended, known 
as the "Education Reform Act of 1993", to provide for an Early 
Retirement Incentive Program for the members of the Massachusetts 
Teachers Retirement System employed by the Andover Public Schools 
with said program to include a five-year additional credit for age, 
service or a combination thereof and a limit of twenty-two (22) on 
the number of eligible employees or take any other action relative 
thereto . 

A motion was made and duly seconded to approve Article 31 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was moved and seconded to change the five-year 
additional credit for age to three years. 

116 



2U 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote 

The original motion was taken up and it was VOTED to approve 
Article 31 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Nollet Drive as shown on a plan approved by the Andover 
Planning Board and entitled "Cedars Edge Definitive Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, Mass." Date: October 20, 1989 Rev. 
November 16, 1989, which plan is recorded with the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 11722. 

On petition of Barbara Maren and others. 

Article 32 was WITHDRAWN Not Laid out 

ARTICLE 33.. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Cobblestone Lane as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board and entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance 
Plan Cobblestone Lane, Andover, Mass.", dated April 1986, which 
plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as 
Plan Number 11163. 

On petition of Elizabeth Murphy and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
33 as published in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 34. To petition the Town of Andover to vote to accept and 
name as a public way, a portion of Windemere Drive running from 
Cricket Circle to Robinswood Way as shown on a plan entitled 
"Definitive Subdivision" Plan of Land "Sunnyside Acres", Andover, 
Mass. Owner: Theodore Realty Trust, Engineer: Kaminski-Gelinas 
Assoc. Inc., Scale 1" = 40', Date: January 27, 1983", and said 
plan is filed with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 9142. 

See also an original Subdivision Plan entitled "Definitive 
Plan Sunnyside Acres, Andover, Mass. Owner: Theodore Realty Trust, 
Engineer: Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc., Scale 1" =40', Date: 
September 20, 1973", and said plan is filed with North Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7129. 

On petition of John P. Ford and others. 
Article 34 was WITHDRAWN NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 35. To petition the Town of Andover to vote to accept and 
name as a public way, Robinswood Way as shown on a plan entitled 
"Definitive Subdivision" Plan of Land "Sunnyside Acres", Andover, 
Mass. Owner: Theodore Realty Trust, Engineer: Kaminski-Gelinas 
Assoc. Inc., Scale 1" = 40' , Date: January 27, 1983", and said 
plan is filed with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 9142. 

See also an original Subdivision Plan entitled "Definitive 
Plan Sunnyside Acres, Andover, Mass. Owner: Theodore Realty Trust, 
Engineer: Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc., Scale 1" = 40', Date: 
September 20, 1973", and said plan is filed with North Essex 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7129. 

On petition of John P. Ford and others. 

Article 35 was WITHDRAWN NOT LAID OUT 



117 



208 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Doyle Circle as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive 
Subdivision Plan 'Doyle Circle', Andover, Mass.", dated June 12, 
1986 and recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds 
as Plan Number 10449. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

36 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will lay out, name, and accept as 
a public way, Dairy Lane as shown on a plan entitled "Dairy Lane, 
prepared by Riverside Engineering Services, Inc., and dated October 
5, 1988", the same being on record in the North Essex Registry of 
Deeds as Plan Number 11654 . 

On petition of Robert F. Kelley and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

37 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 38. To determine if the Town will accept and name Pauline 
Drive as shown on a Plan entitled "Street Acceptance As-Built Plan 
of Land 'Irongate II' Andover, Massachusetts", Scale 1" = 40', 
dated May 28, 1993, prepared by Dana F. Perkins, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers & Land Surveyors. 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

38 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Harper Circle as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board and entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in 
Andover, Harper Circle, January 6, 1983" and recorded with Essex 
North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 9103." 

On petition of Barbara Maren and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

39 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By- 
laws by adding a new section entitled "Pedestrian Regulations" as 
follows: 

a) Definition: As used in this section, the term 
"Pedestrian" is defined as any person using a public 
street in the Town by means of foot, including any 
walker, power walker, race walker, jogger, runner, in- 
line skater or skier, for the express purpose of 
recreation or exercise. 



118 



20^ 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12, 1994 

b) Pedestrians shall travel facing oncoming traffic. 

c) Pedestrians shall not travel more than two abreast. 
Pedestrians shall travel in single file where conditions 
warrant . 

d) Between the hours of one-half hour after sunset and one- 
half hour before sunrise, pedestrians shall wear vests or 
similar garments containing a minimum of ten square 
inches of reflective material on both the front and rear. 

e) Violations: Violations under this section shall be non- 
criminal and be punished by a fine of twenty-five dollars 
($25.00) for the first offense and fifty dollars ($50.00) 
for a second or subsequent offense. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approved Article 

40 as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment to Article 40 was approved by a MAJORITY vote to amend 
section (d) to exempt casual walkers in areas where there are no 
sidewalks from the requirement of wearing reflective clothing. 

A second amendment to Article 40 Section (b) was approved by a 
MAJORITY vote as follows: Except when traveling with the traffic on 
a one-way street, pedestrians shall travel facing oncoming traffic. 

Article 40 was DEFEATED 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 408, of 
the Acts of 1993 and to amend Article XII, Section 32(b) of the 
General By-laws by striking out the first sentence and inserting 
the following sentence: 

"The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any 
license or permit, including renewals and transfers of any party 
whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing 
authority from the tax collector or with respect to any activity, 
event or other matter which is the subject of such license or 
permit and which activity, event or matter is carried out or 
exercised or is to be carried out or exercised on or about real 
estate owned by any party whose name appears on said list furnished 
to the licensing authority from the tax collector; provided, 
however, that written notice is given to the party and the tax 
collector, as required by applicable provisions of law, and the 
party is given a hearing, to be held not earlier than fourteen days 
after said notice." 

and take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

41 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By- 
laws by deleting Article XII, Section 24. (g) , (h) , and (i) in their 
entirety and inserting the following: 

"(g) Signaling devices and indicator devices: 

(1) Every alarm equipment supplier who wants to connect 
automatic protection devices to the Town of Andover 
Police or Fire Department Central Dispatch console shall 
furnish the Police or Fire Chief with a current list of 



119 



210 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

such installations showing the following: 

a. Name, residence address, and telephone number of 
owner or lessee. 

b. Address or place where device is installed and 
telephone number at that location. 

c. Name and telephone number of two (2) other persons 
at different locations who are authorized to 
respond to an emergency at any time, day and night, 
and open the place where the device is installed 
and be able to reset, or terminate such device if 
found to be defective. It shall be the 
responsibility of the alarm system user to keep 
this information up to date. 

d. All premises shall have their legal street numbers 
clearly visible from the street as per existing 
Town by-laws, prior to connection of the alarm 
systems to Central Dispatch console. 

(2) Alarm system installation: 

a. Any current or future alarm user may contract with 
an alarm company of their choice for the purchase, 
lease, installation and servicing of an alarm 
system on their premises. 

b. No alarm system shall be connected to the Central 
Dispatch Console without prior written approval of 
the Chief. 

1. This approval shall include municipal 
connection, direct wire and dial up devices. 

c. The only types of systems which will be allowed to 
connect to the Central Dispatch Console will be 
systems which utilize telephone dialer transmitters 
or connection via Municipal Fire Alarm circuit, or 
such other type deemed compatible with the Central 
Dispatch console. 

1. Existing telephone dialers using voice-type 
tape recorders are allowed. Such alarm 
systems are to use the special alarm telephone 
number set up for this purpose. No alarm 
equipment shall utilize the primary reporting 
numbers for the Andover Public Safety Center. 

d. Actual connection to the Central Dispatch console 
will be made by the Town's designated Alarm 
Contractor or Fire Alarm Division Personnel . Alarm 
users will be required to pay the Alarm Contractor 
for this service as set forth in a contract by the 
Contractor and the Alarm user. 

e. The supplier will contact the Town's designated 
alarm contractor ten (10) days in advance of 
connection to the Town Central Dispatch Console. 

f. The Town accepts no liability whatsoever for 
conditions which prevent proper reception from the 
user's premises. 

(3) Telephone lines will be ordered by the Town designated 
alarm contractor. 

(h) Operational requirements if connected to an outside 
audible or visual alarm: 

120 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12, 1994 

1. The length of time for outside alarm activation 
shall not exceed fifteen (15) minutes. 

2. All alarm systems which use an audible bell, horn 
or siren shall be equipped with an automatic shut- 
off device, which will deactivate the alarm system 
within the specified time in paragraph (1) of this 
section. All alarm users with an audible bell, 
horn or siren must comply with this section within 
ninety (90) days of the effective date of this by- 
law. 

(i) Fines and cancellation of service: 

1. The following shall not count as false alarms: 

a. Town power failure, 

b. Telephone company repair, 

c. Results of a major storm, 

d. Thirty-day new installation, 

e. Break activation, fire or smoke activation. 

2. All alarm users must notify the Police Department 
in advance of any testing of equipment. Failure to 
notify the Police Department in advance of testing 
equipment shall constitute a false alarm, and be 
subject to. the assessment schedule contained 
herein. 

3. If an automatic protection device is activated with 
exception of the above paragraph (1) , the owner 
shall be allowed up to three (3) false alarms per 
year. After the third false alarm, the owner will 
be charged fifteen dollars ($15.00) for each 
additional alarm up to a total of six (6) . After 
the sixth false alarm, each succeeding false alarm 
shall be charged at a rate of fifty dollars 
($50.00). The person(s) responsible for the alarm 
shall be billed on a quarterly basis and notified 
that if the cumulative number of false alarms may 
suspend response to any further alarms until the 
situation has been corrected, or at the discretion 
of the alarm owner each successive false alarm 
after the notification of disconnect will be 
assessed at seventy-five dollars ($75.00) per false 
alarm. Written notification must be provided to 
the Police Department within 24 hours of the 
receipt of the Notice of Disconnect in order to 
avoid the suspension of response to further alarms 
and to accept the additional fee for each 
successive alarm until the situation can be 
rectified by the alarm user. Notice of Disconnect 
will be served in hand or by certified mail. Once 
the alarm problem has been repaired and 
documentation of such repair has been provided to 
the Police Department and payment has been received 
for the false alarms responded to, then the 
department will resume response to alarms received. 
Billing for false alarms will be done on a 
quarterly basis and accumulated false alarms done 
on a yearly basis from July 1 through June 30 of 
each year. Persons with outstanding balances on 
alarm fees after 90 days of being billed will be 
subject to a twenty-five dollar ($25.00) processing 
fee as well as notification of disconnect until the 
balance is paid in full. 



121 



21 



^ 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

4. Failure to comply with Section 1, paragraph a, b, 
c, d or subsection (h) paragraph 1, 2 or Section 
(i) paragraph 2 shall be punishable by a fine of 
twenty-five dollars ($25.00). 

5. A hearing may be requested before the termination 
from the Town Central Dispatch Console, or the 
special trunkline within five (5) days of official 
notification of such termination either by the Town 
or Town designated Alarm Contractor. 

j. Exceptions: 

The provisions of this by-law shall not apply to alarm 
devices owned or controlled by the Town of Andover, nor 
to alarms installed in motor vehicles. 

k. Liability of Town limited: 

The Town shall take every reasonable precaution to assure 
that alarm and prerecorded messages received by the Town 
Public Safety Central Dispatch are given appropriate 
attention and are acted upon expeditiously. The Town 
shall not be liable for any defects in operation of 
automatic protection devices and signal line systems, for 
any failure or neglect to respond appropriately upon 
receipt of an alarm from such a source. In the event 
that the Town finds it necessary to disconnect an 
automatic protection device or signalling device, the 
Town shall incur no liability by such action. 

Cross reference - Fire Prevention Code, Article X." 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 42 was WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII of 
the Andover Zoning By-law, by adding a new subsection IV.B.11B as 
follows: 

"11B. As described in 11A above, however, 
such establishment: (a) shall not 
exceed a gross floor area of 2,000 
square feet for retail use, and (b) 
may be located in a gasoline service 
station building, or as a 
convenience store in a separate 
building, limited to only one 
building on a parcel. There shall 
be only one convenience store per 
one (1) mile radius, including 
convenience stores referred to in 
subsection 11A above, measured from 
the location of the proposed 
convenience store. 

ZONING DISTRICTS 

11B. SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA ID 

N N N N BA N N N BA BA BA" 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Article 43 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 5 NO: Planning Board conceded defeat - 

A 2/3 vote required 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

122 



ADJODRKED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12, 1994 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII of 
the Andover Zoning By-law as follows: 

1. Add to the "Table of Use Regulations" the following new use 
inserted below Section IV.B.11A: 

"11B. As in 11A above, but said establishment shall be 
subordinate and customarily incidental to the 
principal use, a gasoline service station, and 
shall be located in the same building. Said 
accessory use shall be limited to occupying less 
than 1500 sg.ft. of gross floor area and there 
shall be no more than one establishment per one 
mile radius." 

2. Allow in the following zoning districts by Special Permit: 
LS, ID, and IA. 

On petition of Michael F. Mimno and others. 

Article 44 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 132 NO: 259 A 2/3 vote required 

Planning Board Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectman Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, 
Section 11 of the General By-laws by adding the following 
subsection: 

"(o) Removal and Disposal of Canine Waste 

(1) It shall be the duty of each person who owns, possesses 
or controls a dog to remove and dispose of any feces left 
by his/her dog on any sidewalk, street or other public 
area in the Town. It shall further be the duty of each 
person who owns, possesses or controls a dog to remove 
and dispose of any feces left by his/her dog on any 
private property neither owned nor occupied by said 
person. 

(2) No person who owns, possesses or controls such dog shall 
appear with such dog on any sidewalk, street, park or 
other public area without the means of removal of any 
feces left by such dog. Furthermore, no person who owns, 
possesses or controls such dog shall appear with such dog 
on any private property neither owned nor occupied by 
said person without the means of removal of any feces 
left by said dog. 

(3) For the purposes of this regulation, the means of removal 
shall be any tool, implement, or other device carried for 
the purpose of picking up and containing such feces, 
unexposed to said person or the public. Disposal shall 
be accomplished by transporting such feces to a place 
suitable and regularly reserved for the disposal of 
canine feces, or as otherwise designated as appropriate 
by the Board of Health. 

(4) Enforcement of this section may, in the first instance, 
by pursued through the provisions of Section 2 ID of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws, which provides for a non- 
criminal disposition. The enforcing persons shall be any 
police officer of the Town, or any Animal Control Officer 
of the Town. 



123 



C I 4 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

(5) This regulation shall not apply to a dog accompanying any 
handicapped person who, by reason of his/her handicap, is 
physically unable to comply with the requirements of this 
By-law, or to any individual who utilizes a guide dog. 

(6) The provisions of this section are severable; and if any 
of the provisions of this section shall be held 
unconstitutional or otherwise invalid by any court of 
competent jurisdiction, the decision of such court shall 
not affect or impair any of the remaining provisions." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 45 was moved as printed 
in the Warrant. 

An amendment to ARTICLE 45 was moved and seconded to add at the end 
of the first sentence of subparagraph (1) the following: except 
land under the control of the Conservation Commission. 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was moved and it was VOTED the Article 45 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 249 NO: 224 



Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Andover 
Board of Selectmen and Town Manager, henceforth, to use no more 
than 50% of the allowable new growth under the Proposition 2k 
formula to be used to determine the levy limit. 

On petition of Dennis A. Teves and others. 

Article 46 was DEFEATED 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $4,000 for the first year's 
operation, and to require that, henceforth, all meetings of the 
Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover shall be recorded 
officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by 
other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting recordings of 
which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to 
be preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and 
the transcripts shall be made available to the public as soon as 
possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 47 was DEFEATED 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



124 



15 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 12. 1994 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following 
bylaw for the regulation of the proceedings at all annual and 
special Town Meetings of the Town of Andover: 

Any member of the Town Meeting who speaks to a subject under 
consideration, shall be given, if he or she so requests, the 
privilege of yielding the floor temporarily for the purpose of 
allowing any other Town Meeting member or members in the room 
to pose questions or to present points of view pertaining to 
the subject under consideration, while retaining the floor to 
respond to such questions and points of view. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 48 was DEFEATED 

Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $4,000 for the first year's 
operation, and to require that, henceforth, all meetings of the 
Finance Committee of the Town of Andover shall be recorded 
officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by 
other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting recordings of 
which transcripts shall be made, such recordings and transcripts to 
be preserved in perpetuity, and copies of both the recordings and 
the transcripts shall be made available to the public as soon as 
possible, at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 49 was DEFEATED 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 
10:20 P.M. until Wednesday, April 13, 1994 at 7:00 P.M. at the Dunn 
Gymnasium, Shawsheen Road, Andover High School. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETIHG - APRIL 13. 1994 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed that 397 voters 
were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 
7:04 P.M.. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 33 non-voters to the meeting 
and to escort non-voters to the non-voting section thereafter. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $425,000, or any other 
sum, to supplement funds received from the Commonwealth for highway 
purposes, for constructing or reconstructing public ways with 
permanent pavement, including costs incidental or related thereto, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded that the sum of $425,000 be 
hereby appropriated to supplement funds received from the 
Commonwealth for highway purposes for constructing or 
reconstructing public ways with permanent pavement, including costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow not exceeding $425,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(5), of the General Laws, as amended and 



125 



216 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 237 NO: 2 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $150,000, or any other 
sum, for constructing or reconstructing bridges including costs 
incidental or related thereto, or take any other action related 
thereto . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted that the sum of 
$150,000 be hereby appropriated for constructing or reconstructing 
bridges, including costs incidental and related thereto, and that 
to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not exceeding $150,000 under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, 7(4), of the General Laws, as amended 
and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 277 NO: O A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to enact the following 
General By-Law: 

BY-LAW AFFECTING SMOKING AND THE SALE, VENDING AND 
DISTRIBUTION OF TOBACCO IN ANDOVER 

SECTION 1. RATIONALE/PURPOSE 

There exists conclusive evidence that tobacco smoke causes 
cancer, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular disease, negative 
birth outcomes, as well as, irritations to the eyes, nose, and 
throat. Both smokers and those exposed to second hand smoke are at 
risk. It is the opinion of the Board of Health that nonsmokers 
should not be involuntarily exposed to tobacco smoke. 

More than 90% of all smokers begin smoking before the age of 
eighteen (the legal age to purchase cigarettes in the Commonwealth) 
and an estimated 3,000 minors begin smoking every day in the United 
States. There is therefore, an important health need to reduce 
easy access to tobacco products by youths through strict 
enforcement of the state law prohibiting sales to minors, M.G.L. , 
Chapter 270, Section 6. 

SECTION 2. DEFINITIONS 

A. BAR: means an establishment which is primarily dedicated to 
the serving of alcoholic beverages and in which the service of 
food is only incidental to the consumption of such beverages. 
This does not include the lounge or bar service areas of a 
food service establishment. 

B. DESIGNATED SMOKING AREA: means the area, designated by the 
proprietor, manager, owner or other person (s) of authority, in 
which smoking is permitted. Such areas shall be designated so 
as to minimize exposure of non-smoking patrons and/or 
employees. 



126 



217 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

C. EMPLOYEE: means any individual who performs services for an 
employer in return for wages or profit. 

D. EMPLOYER: means any individual, partnership, association, 
corporation, trust, or other organized group of individuals, 
including the Town of Andover or any agency thereof, which 
regularly uses the services of one (1) or more employees. 

E. ENCLOSED: means a space bounded by walls with a door and under 
a roof. 

F. FREE-STANDING DISPLAY: means any display of cigarettes or 
tobacco products which is not attached to or on top of a 
check-out counter, or where distribution of the tobacco 
products is not directly controlled by an employee. 

G. FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENT: means any place in which food is 
prepared for service with or without charge including but not 
limited to any restaurant, coffee shop, cafeteria, workplace 
cafeteria, luncheonette, short-order cafe, pizza shop, donut 
shop, grille, tea room, sandwich shop, bar, tavern, or lounge. 

H. INDOOR SPORTS ARENA: means any sports pavilion, gymnasium, 
health spa, boxing arena, swimming pool, roller or ice rink, 
bowling alley, or other similar place where members of the 
general public assemble to engage in physical exercise, 
participate in athletic competition or witness sports events. 

I. LOUNGE/BAR SERVICE: means any area in a food service 
establishment where alcoholic beverages are served or prepared 

J. MINOR: means person under eighteen years of age. 

K. MUNICIPAL BUILDING: For the purpose of this by-law, Municipal 
Building means the Town Offices, Library, Police/Fire Station, 
Schools and School Administration Building, Water Treatment 
Plant, Department of Public Works, all Municipal Maintenance 
Buildings, and any and all facilities owned and operated by 
the Town. 

L. NONSMOKING AREA: means any area that is designated and posted 
by the proprietor, owner, or person in charge as a place where 
smoking by patrons, employees or others is prohibited. 

M. PUBLIC PLACE: means an enclosed, indoor area when open to and 
used by the general public, including but not limited to the 
following: licensed childcare locations, educational 
facilities, elevators accessible to the public, clinics and 
nursing homes, inns, hotel and motels lobbies, stairwells, 
halls, entranceway s , public restrooms, libraries, municipal 
buildings, museums, retail food establishments, indoor sports 
arenas, theaters, auditoriums, public transit facilities, and 
any rooms or halls when used for public meetings. A room or 
hall used for a private social function in which the sponsor 
of the private function and not the owner or proprietor has 
control over the seating arrangements shall not be construed 
as a public place. 

N. RESTAURANT: means any establishment serving food for 
consumption on the premises which maintains tables for the use 
of its customers. This includes cafeterias in the workplace. 

0. RETAIL FOOD ESTABLISHMENT: means any establishment commonly 
known as a supermarket, grocery store or convenience store in 
which the primary activity is the sale of food items to the 
public for off -premise consumption. 

P. RETAIL STORE: means any establishment selling goods, articles 
or personal services to the public. 



127 



218 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

Q. SEATING CAPACITY: means the capacity designated on the 
occupancy permit. 

R. SMOKING: means the lighting of any cigar, cigarette, pipe or 
other tobacco product. 

S. TOBACCO: means cigarettes, chewing tobacco, snuff or tobacco 
in any of its forms. 

T. TOBACCO VENDING MACHINES: means a device which dispenses 
tobacco products by self-service or by remote control. 

U. WORKPLACE: means any area within a structure or portion 
thereof in which one (1) or more employees perform services 
for their employer. It also includes employee lounges, 
restrooms, conference rooms, hallways, stairways, and 
entranceways . 



SECTION 3. PROHIBITION ON SMOKING IN PUBLIC PLACES 

1. MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 

A. Smoking and the use of other tobacco products shall not 
be permitted in any Municipal building in the Town of 
Andover. 

2. RESTAURANTS 

A. Smoking shall not be permitted in any restaurant in the 
Town of Andover. This shall also include the lounge/bar 
service area in a food service establishment. 



B. Each restaurant shall conspicuously post signs to 
indicate that it is a non-smoking establishment. The 
proprietor, manager, or person in charge shall ask 
patrons who may be smoking to refrain from smoking. 

3. RETAIL STORES 

A. The prohibition on smoking in public places shall apply 
to retail stores doing business with the general public. 
Smoking areas may be designated in portions of said 
stores not open to the public and in stores whose 
business is exclusively dedicated to the sale of tobacco 
products . 

4. OTHER PUBLIC PLACES 

A. No person shall smoke in any public place as defined in 
section 2 (M) except that smoking shall be permitted in 
specifically designated smoking areas as provided in 
4(B). Hallways, elevators, entranceways, stairways, 
restrooms, and waiting areas may not be designated as 
smoking areas. No place governed by this by-law shall be 
designated as a smoking area in its entirety. Nothing in 
this section shall be construed as to require the 
creation of a smoking area. 

B. Smoking areas may be designated in museums, clinics, 
health care facilities, nursing homes, long-term care 
facilities, auditoriums, indoor sporting arenas, hotel 
and motel lobbies, private schools and theaters provided 
that comparable nonsmoking areas of sufficient size and 
capacity are available. Physical barriers and a separate 
ventilation system shall be used to segregate smoking 
areas from nonsmoking areas. Hallways, elevators, 
entranceways, stairwells, restrooms, and waiting areas in 



128 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

all the above facilities may not be designated as smoking 
areas. Areas designated as smoking areas must be 
conspicuously marked. 

5. EXCLUSIONS 

The provisions of this by-law shall not apply to: 

A. Bars, as defined in section 2(A). 

B. Private residences, including private and personal 
property . 

C. Hotel and motel rooms rented to guests that have been 
designated as smoking rooms. 

D. Stores exclusively dedicated to the sale of tobacco 
products . 



E. Hotel and motel conference/meeting rooms and private 
assembly rooms while these places are being used for 
private functions. 

F. Private or semiprivate rooms of nursing homes and long- 
term care facilities, occupied by one (1) or more 
patients, all of whom are smokers who have requested in 
writing on the facility admission form to be placed in 
rooms designated as smoking rooms. These rooms are to be 
situated in a manner which will effectively make use of 
the ventilation system so as to provide ambient air 
quality equal to the ambient air quality in non-smoking 
areas. Designated smoking areas will be terminated upon 
failure of the ventilation system in that area. 



6. IMPLEMENTATION 

The proprietor (s) or other person (s) in charge of a place 
covered by this by-law shall prevent smoking in non-smoking areas 
by: 

A. Conspicuously posting a notice or sign at each entrance 
to the public place indicating smoking is prohibited 
therein except in specifically designated smoking areas. 
In addition, conspicuously posting ••SMOKING" and "NO 
SMOKING" signs, or the international "NO SMOKING" symbol, 
in every area where smoking is permitted or prohibited by 
this by-law. 

B. Arranging seating so that physical barriers, ventilation 
systems and available space are utilized to eliminate the 
presence of smoking by-products in the nonsmoking area. 
Nonsmoking areas are to be situated near the ventilation 
system of the facility. The heating, ventilation and air 
conditioning system, (HVAC) , shall be installed so that 
no return air from smoking areas may enter the unit. 

C. Requiring patrons who may be smoking in a non-smoking 
area either to refrain from smoking or move to a smoking 
area. 

D. Using any other means which may be appropriate and 
reasonable to enforce this by-law. 



129 



220 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

SECTION 4. RETAIL SALE OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS 

1. No person, firm, corporation, establishment, or agency shall 
sell cigarettes, chewing tobacco products or other tobacco 
products in the Town of Andover unless their purchase is 
controlled by an employee of the establishment. Free-standing 
displays of cigarettes, chewing tobacco or other tobacco 
products from which individual packages or cartons may be 
selected by the customer shall not be permitted. 

2. In conformance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 270, 
Section 6, no person shall sell cigarettes, chewing tobacco, 
snuff or tobacco products in any of its forms to any person 
under the age of eighteen (18) years old, or not being his/her 
parent or guardian, give cigarettes, snuff or tobacco products 
in any of its forms to any person under the age of eighteen 
(18) years. 

3. In conformance with Massachusetts General Law Chapter 270, 
Section 7, a copy of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 270, 
Section 6 shall be posted conspicuously by the owner or other 
person -in charge thereof in the shop or other place to sell 
cigarettes at retail. The notice to be posted shall be that 
notice provided by the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health. Such notice shall be at least 48 square inches and 
shall be posted at all cash registers where tobacco products 
may be purchased. They shall be posted in such a manner so 
that it may be readily seen by a person standing at or 
approaching the cash register. Such notice shall directly 
face the purchaser and shall not be obstructed from view or 
placed at a height of not less that four (4) feet or greater 
than nine (9) feet from the floor. 

4. Store owners, managers, or other person in charge where 
cigarettes, chewing tobacco and other tobacco products are 
sold shall conspicuously post and maintain signs that proof of 
age is required to purchase cigarettes or tobacco products. 
At a minimum signs shall be posted at every cash register. 



5. All employees selling cigarettes, chewing tobacco or other 
tobacco products in any form will positively establish the 
purchaser's age as eighteen (18) years or older, unless the 
seller has some other conclusive basis for determining the 
buyer is over the age of eighteen (18) . No employee shall 
sell cigarettes or other tobacco products to a person under 
eighteen (18) years of age who has a note from an adult 
requesting such sale. 

6. No person, firm, corporation, establishment, or agency selling 
cigarettes, chewing tobacco, or other tobacco products in any 
of its forms in the Town of Andover shall allow anyone to sell 
tobacco products until the employee has read the by-law and 
the State Laws pertaining to the sale of tobacco products and 
has signed a affidavit, supplied by the Board of Health to be 
kept on file at the establishment. The employee's signature 
will verify that all the applicable State and local 
regulations have been read and understood. This file must be 
retained for the length of each individual's employment and 
must be made available for inspection upon request by the 
Board of Health or it's agent (s) . 

7. Sale or distribution of tobacco products in any form other 
than an original factory-wrapped package is prohibited. 



130 



22 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

SECTION 5. TOBACCO VENDING MACHINES 

No person, firm, corporation, establishment or agency shall 
install or maintain a vending machine to distribute or sell tobacco 
products in the Town of Andover unless the vending machine is 
located in a bar, and the vending machine is located not closer 
than thirty (30) feet from any entrance or exit. All vending 
machines allowed under this section shall display a conspicuous 
sign stating that it is illegal for minors to purchase cigarettes 
and other tobacco products. 

SECTION 6. VARIANCE 

1. The Board of Health may vary the application of any provision 
of this by-law with respect to any particular case when the 
Board of Health finds the enforcement thereof would do 
manifest injustice and an equal or greater degree of 
environmental protection can be afforded by granting of the 
variance; provided, that the decision of the Board of Health 
is not in conflict with the spirit of this by-law. 

2. Every request for a variance shall be made in writing and 
shall state the specific variance sought and the reasons 
thereof. Notice of a variance request must be published in a 
local newspaper at least two weeks before the scheduled date 
of the public hearing. 

3 . Any variance granted must be in writing with a copy available 
to the public at all reasonable business hours in the office 
of the Town Clerk and in the office of the Board of Health. 
Any variance granted must be posted on the premise in a 
prominent location for the duration that the variance is in 
effect. 

SECTION 7. PENALTIES/ENFORCEMENT 

1. Any person who violates any section of this bylaw may be 
subject to the following fines and penalties: 

A. Fifty dollar ($50.00) fine for first offense. 

B. One hundred ($100.00) fine for second offense and every 
offense thereafter. 



C. Suspension of any license issued by the Board of Health. 
Such suspension shall not exceed a period of seven (7) 
days. 

D. Removal of vending machine. 

2. Violations of this by-law and penalties listed in Section 7(1) 
may be enforced as provided for in M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 
21D (Non-Criminal Disposition) . The designated enforcement 
officer of this by-law shall be the agents of the Board of 
Health. 

3. In addition to the remedies provided by Section 7(1) and 7(2), 
the Board of Health may apply for injunctive relief to enforce 
the provisions of this by-law in any court of competent 
jurisdiction. 

4. Any person aggrieved by the willful failure or refusal to 
comply with restrictions in any municipal building may 
complain in writing to the Board of Health. The Board of 
Health, or its agent, shall respond in writing within twenty 
(20) working days to the complainant citing the results of its 
investigation into the complaint and any action taken to 
enforce the provisions of this by-law. 



131 



C £ c 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

5. Compliance monitoring of this by-law and its requirements may 
be enforced through periodic inspections or other legal means. 

SECTION 8. SEVERABILITY 

1. Each provision of this by-law is construed as separate to the 
extent that if any section, item, sentence, clause, or phrase 
is determined to be invalid for any reason, the remainder of 
this by-law shall continue in full force and effect. 

SECTION 9. EFFECTIVE DATE 

The provisions of this by-law will become effective thirty 
(30) days from the date of approval by the Office of the Attorney 
General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 52 was moved as printed 
in the Warrant. 

An amendment to was moved and seconded to replace parts of Section 
3 and all of Section 5 in Article 52 of the Warrant with the 
following: 

SECTION 3. Prohibition on Smoking in Public Places 

1. MUNICIPAL BUILDING 

A. Smoking and other tobacco products shall not be 
permitted in any Municipal building in the Town of 
Andover except in designated areas. 

2. RESTAURANTS 

A. Smoking shall not be permitted in any restaurant in 
the Town of Andover. This shall also include the 
lounge/bar service area in a food service 
establishment, except in designated smoking areas. 

B. Each restaurant shall conspicuously post signs to 
indicate that it has a non-smoking area. The 
proprietor, manager, or person in charge shall ask 
patrons who may be smoking to refrain from smoking 
except in designated areas. 

SECTION 5. Tobacco Vending Machines 

No person, firm, corporation, establishment or agency shall 
install or maintain a vending machine to distribute or sell 
tobacco products in the Town of Andover unless the vending 
machine is located in a bar, restaurant, inn or hotel, and the 
vending machine is located not closer than thirty (30) feet 
from any entrance or exit. All vending machines allowed under 
this section shall display a conspicuous sign stating that it 
is illegal for minors to purchase cigarettes and other tobacco 
products . 

The amendment was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

The original motion was moved and it was VOTED that Article 52 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 279 NO: 86 

Selectmen's Report: Disapproval 
Board of Health Report: Approval 



132 



?;-•; 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $200,000 for 
the purpose of engineering services for plans and specifications 
associated with the construction and reconstructing of water mains 
or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$200,000 be hereby appropriated for engineering services for plans 
and specifications associated with the construction and 
reconstruction of water mains, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectman, 
is authorized to borrow not exceeding $200,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(22), of the General Laws, as amended and 
supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 282 NO: 1 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report; Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $200,000, or any other 
sum, for the acquisition by purchase or taking by eminent domain of 
land and improvements thereon at 27-29 Pearson Street (Map 38, Lot 
6) within the Town for municipal purposes, including costs 
incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related 
thereto . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$200,000 be hereby appropriated for the acquisition by purchase or 
taking by eminent domain of the land and improvements thereon at 
27-29 Pearson Street (Map 38, Lot 6) within the Town for municipal 
purposes, including site clearance and other costs incidental and 
related thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow not exceeding $200,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
Section 7(3), of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor. 

VOTE: YES: 209 NO: 43 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report; Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $78,279, or any other 
sum, for the acquisition by purchase or taking by eminent domain of 
land and improvements thereon or any part thereof at 19 Moraine 
Street (Map 72, Lot 27) within the Town for school purposes, 
including costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

Article 55 was WITHDRAWN 

Mr. Steve Boudreau of 19 Moraine Street spoke of the dangers that 
are increasing on Moraine Street and expressed his hope that the 
elected officials of the Town would take this into account in the 
planning of the Andover High School build- ing program. 



133 



Z2^ 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to ratify the expenditure 
of $295,000 from the Conservation Fund for the acquisition by 
eminent domain, for conservation purposes described in 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, which 
acquisition was previously approved by vote under Article 24 of the 
1985 Annual Town Meeting, the land acquired by Order of Taking 
recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 
2219, Page 339 on June 19, 1986 and described as follows: 

Parcel 4 of Assessor's Map 170, 38 acres more or less; 
Parcel 2 of Assessor's Map 146, 20 acres more or less, 
located in the Valley of Fish Brook West of Route 1-93; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
56 as printed in the Warrant by a UNANIMOUS vote. 

Finance Committee Report; Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, 
Section 11. (a) Definitions, of the General By-laws by inserting 
the following: 

"License Period: The time between January 1 and the following 
December 31, both dates inclusive." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 57 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Selectmen's Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 26 of Chapter 71 of the Acts of 1993 amending Section 3C 
of Chapter 60 of the General Laws, relative to the design and 
designation of a place on its motor vehicle excise tax bills, 
municipal tax bills, or other forms as may be deemed appropriate by 
the Town Manager, whereby the taxpayers of Andover can voluntarily 
check off, donate and pledge an amount not less than one dollar or 
such other designated amounts which shall increase the amount 
otherwise due, and to establish a town educational fund, the 
purpose of which shall be to provide supplemental educational 
funding for local educational needs. 

Article 58 was WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII of 
the Andover Zoning By-law as follows: 

(1) By amending Section III. A. 2 "Business Districts", by 
deleting the words "SC-Shopping Center" and replacing with the 
words "LS-Limited Service", and 

(2) That the zoning of the following parcels of land in the 
Town of Andover is hereby changed from a Shopping Center District 
to a Limited Service District, which shall be shown on the Zoning 
Map of Andover: 

Assessor's Map 151, Lots 14A, 15, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23; and 
Assessor's Map 152, Lot 18. 

(3) By amending Section V.A. , Table of Dimensional 
Requirements, by deleting the line beginning with the words 
"Shopping Center" and replacing with a new line to read as follows: 



134 



It 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

A. Table of Dimensional Requirements 



APRIL 13. 1994 



NO 1 li: The nuinbeis in |>atciitlicsis un Hie vaiious 
and succiol ie<|uiiciiiciils, of § V, Dimensional icip 


headings o( litis ladle tcfci to coucs|ioiidiiig natagtaplis ill Subsection U, lixceplious 
iicincnls. 


Ulslilcl 


(«) 

Mllllllllllll 1 Alt 

Dlinciisiuiis 


(2). (3) 
Mlnlniiiin Vnul Depth 


(4) 

Minimum llclglil 


Maximum Corcrngc 
Including Accessor; 

Uulltlhig 

(iiercetil) 


A ten 
(sipinrc Teet) 


I'l outline 
(feel) 


I'l out 
(feci) 


Siile 
(feel) 


Hem 
(reel) 


Feel 


SluHes 


Li.tted Service 


" 


3U 5U 


50 


40 


3 


30*** 



'•• Number of sloiies may be itictcascd and lol coverage decreased coiics|Mimliiigly i( she conditions winaiil. lite gross door nei of lite 
resulting building slmll not exceed llial allowed by light lo meel Hie slandaids of the Andover Zoning Bylaw and duplet 131, Section 40 
(Wetland Protection Act). 



(4) By amending subsection Vl.B.3.d by adding the words "and 
Limited Service Districts (LS)" after the words "General Business 
Districts (GB)", and 

(5) By deleting subsection VI.B.3.b. in its entirety and 
renumbering subsections VI.B.3.C through g as subsections VI.B.3.b 
through f, and 

(6) By deleting from subsection VI.C.l the words "In Shopping 
Center Districts and Office Park" and replacing with the words "In 
the Office Park Districts", and 

(7) By amending Section VI. C to add a new subsection VI. C. 4 
to read as follows: 

"4. In the Limited Service District, landscape screening 
shall be provided and maintained as required in 
subsection VI. C. 2 of this Bylaw. Parking areas shall be 
enclosed (except for access points) by a landscaped 
buffer not less than twelve (12) feet wide, planted with 
shade trees. Each parking area shall have interior 
landscaping areas, primarily planted with trees, 
equivalent in size to five (5) per cent of that parking 
area's total pavement area." 



(8) By amending Section IV. B. , Table of Use Regulations, by 
deleting the column entitled SC and inserting a new column entitled 
LS, the amended Table to read as follows: 

or take any other action related thereto. 



135 



db 



ZONING BY-LAW 

T'llilc of" Use Kci*ul:i(iuiis 

§ IV, Subset lion 1) 
Town of Andover 



KEY: 

Y ■ Permitted use. 

DA ■ By special pt mill acted on by Hoard of Appeals. 

rU • By special peiniil acled on by [Manning Doaid. 

BS « By special permit acted on by Board of Selectmen. 





OJ 




c 


a) 


•<-t 


v 


1-1 


OJ 




•H 


> 


OJ 


OJ 


o 


ST. 


II 


II 


ll 


II 


V 


V 



Residential Uses 


Itesidence 


lluslness 


Industrial 


SKA 


SKI) 


SRC 


AIT 


SC 


LS 


OP 


<JD 


MU 


1G 


IA 


ID 


1. Deticbed one-family dwelling 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 
I'll 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


1 A. Ouster development (see i VI.D.) 


N 


PD 


TD 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


2. boarding or lodging house which shall mean 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


I dwelling in which meals ate served, other 


























than on s transient basis, for compensation. 


























or rooms are let to persons not members of 


























the family resident Ibetein (see 'family,* 


























i 11.7) 


























3. Multiple dwellings: 


a. Conversion of a one-family or a two- or 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


N 


N 


N 


more family dwelling subject to the 


























provisions of ( VI.U.I of this bylaw 






~H~ 


~DA~ 


















b. Multiple-dwelling subject to the provisions 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


of 1 Vl.0.2 and I V.A of this bylaw 


























c Planned Uevclopmenl--Mullifatnily or 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


PD 


ro 


N 


N 


N 


Miaed Use subject to the provisions of 


























| VI.O.3 of this bylaw (Amended 4-6- 


























1988 AIM, Art 62] 


























d. Conversion of an existing structure of 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N< 


N 


N 


N. 


N 


N 


N 


N 


30,000 square feel gross floor area or more 


























to mvllifamily use, subject to the 


























provisions of ' VI.O.4 of this bylaw 


























(Amended 4-12-1988 ATM. Art 101] 


























e. New mullifaniily dwelling construction 


PD 


PD 


PD 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


subject to the provisions of * VI.O.5 of 


























this bylaw (Amended 4-3-1985 AIM, 


























Art 69] 


























Miscellaneous Malo Uses 


4. Religious or educational uses exempt from 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


zoning prohibition by f 3. Chapter 40A. 


























MGL if otherwise in compliance with this 


























bylaw; municipal facility voted at a town 


























meeting; any use or facility for conservation 


























of natural resources, for the preservation of 


























historic sites, or for park or recreational 


























purposes, and held for public use by • private 










.; 
















nonprofit organization 










:. 
















5. Hospital or sanitarium, test, convalescent or 


DA 


BA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


nursing home 


























6. Philanthropic ot charitable Institution 


DA 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


ISA 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


N 



136 



ANDOVOR CODE 





a> 




c 


0.) 


-H 


4J 


.J 


<u 




i-H 


* 


ai 


0) 


Q 


55 


ll 


II 


ii 


II 


V 


V 



111 





Itesldence 


llirsiness 


Industrial 


5RA 


SHU 


SRC 


ATI 


SC I LS 


or 


CD 


MU 


IC 


1A 


ID 


7. Outdoor tecieit ion club or camp operated in 
whole or in pari as a commercial enterprise, 
provided lhal Ihe site therefor shall contain at 
least SO acres, lhal buildings structures, 
paved areas, other than driveways, and olhcr 
Intensively developed portions of the site 
shall be set back al leasl IUU feel Itonr every 
(Heel and properly line and lhal any 
commercial activities, other lhan 
participation In indoor recreation, shall be 
clearly Incidental lo Ihe principal outdoor 
recreation uses 


DA 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


BA 


8. Private club not conducted (or profit 


DA 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Uuslness arrd Commercial Uses 








9. Establishment for personal or consumer 
services 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


N 


N 


V 


Y 


Y 


DA 


N 


10. Banking establishment 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


DA 


DA 


DA 


11. Establishment for Ihe retail sale of 
merchandise, or for Ihe sale of such 
merchandise olher lhan al retail if incidental 
lo Ihe operation of a retail establishment, 
including processing and/or assembly of 
merchandise when-clearly accessory lo Ihe 
sale of such merchandise on the premises 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


1 1 A. Convenience slore, which shall mean 
commercial establishment whose principal 

domestic or personal consumption needs, 
including but nol limited lo Ihe sale of all or 
one of Ihe following items: household goods, 
meal or food products, bakery goods, 
newspapers, periodicals, pharmaceuticals, 
dairy products and beverages, litis does nol 
include Ihe sale of alcoholic beverages. Such 
establishment: (a) nol lo esceed a usable 
floor area of 3,500 square feel for retail use, 

(b) having ealended hours of operation, and 

(c) having a high turnover of customers per 
hour. (Amended 4-12-1988 AIM, Art. 9SJ 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


12. Trade, professional or other school 
conducted as a gainful business 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


DA 


Y 


N 


N 


DA 


DA 


13. Health care office or clinic for eiaminalion 
and treatment of persons as outpatients 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


DA 


DA 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


H. Funeral home 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


IS. Self-service laundry or dry-cleaning 
operation 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


N 


N 


DA 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


16. Restaurants: 


























a. An establishment where Ihe principal 
activity Is Ihe service or sale of food or 
drink for consumption on piemises 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA ;UA 


N 


Y 


DA 


Y 


DA 


DA 


b. An establishment whose primary business 
is Ihe sale of food or drink for 
consumption on or off premises which Is: 

(1) Primarily Intended for Immediate 
consumption rather lhan for use as an 
ingredient or component of meals; and 

(2) Available upon a short wailing lime; 
and 

(3) Packaged or presented in such a 
manner lhal il can readily be consumed 
outside Ihe premises where il Is 
purchased 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


N 


DA 


N 


N 



137 



228 



fl) 

Q> 01 

ZONING IJY-LAW ° * 

v v 





Residence 




It ii slurs* 


liitlnslrlnl 


SUA 


SHI) 


sue 


AIT 


SC 


1.S or 

N N 


CD 


MO 


it; 


IA 


10 


c. An establishment which provides service 
or sale of food or drink to customers while 
in Iheir vehicles 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


17. Shop for custom work involving the 
manufacture of articles lo be sold on lite 
premises 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


11 N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


18. Commercial establishment involving the 
assembly of people for indoor recreation or 
amusement for purposes of dining, drinking 
or dancing; musical or theatrical 
entertainment; or sporting events or athletic 
activities 


N 


N 


N 


N 


OA 


HA N 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


19. Business, professional or administrative 
office 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


BA OA 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


20. Motel or hotel 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


BA N 


Y 


N 


N 


DA 


DA 


21. Commercial parking lot or parking gaiage, 
provided that such operation when conducted 
in the open shall be screened from adjacent 
residential uses by I wall or evergreen hedge 
at least 5 feel high. 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


N N 


Y 


DA 


Y 


N 


N 


22. Establishment for sale or rental of 
automobiles 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


N 


23. Gasoline service station, provided that no 
major automobile repairs involving body 
work are made on the premises 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


BA N 


DA 


BA 


BA 


N 


N 


24. Repair garage or body shop for motorized 
vehicles 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


DA 


DA 


BA 


N 


N 


23. Car washing facility containing more than 2 
Stalls provided that all operations arc 
conducted within an enclosed building: and 
subject lo the limitations in I V.D.9. 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


DA 


N 


BA 


N 


N 


26. Duilding supply and fuel establishment, 
contractor's yard and similar wholesale 
Storage warehousing, or service uses 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 

1 


N 


N 


Y 


BA 


N 


Manufacturing and Industrial Uses 


27. Laboratory for research and development 
work, or establishment engaged in 
manufacture or other Industrial work, 
including fabrication assembly, warehousing 
and uses accessory thereto. See also 
restrictions coveted In other applicable 
portions of the bylaw 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


N 


H 


Y 


Y 


N 


28. As in Paragraph 27 above, provided that all 
activities including the storage of goods, 
materials, products, equipment and 
aomegisleted motor vehicles shall be 
conducted within enclosed structures. See 
also restrictions covered In other applicable 
portions of the bylaw 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


29. Offensive industrial operations, including 
the following: 

(a) Abattoir, stockyard, or establishment for 
the reduction of offal, garbage oi animal 
matter 

(b) Incinerator (except as operated by the 
town) 

(c) Manufacture or storage of explosives or 
fireworks 

(d) Manufacture of cement or lime 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 



138 



22°> 



ANDOVI3R CODIi " 

II 
v 



c 

Z 3 

II 
II 
v 





Resilience 






Muslims 


Industrial 


SUA 


51(11 


site 


ATI 


SC 


InS 


OP 


OU 


MU 


IO 


IA 


ID 


(e) Junk- or scrap yard, which shall mcin • 
lot osfd (or the storage of any worn-out. 
cast-off or discarded material ready for 
destruction or collected for salvage or 
conversion lo some «se 

(0 Track leiminal or Intermediate transfer 
facility 

(g) Any use which creates a hazard lo safely 
and health In the community or danger of 
fire or caploslon or which creates dust, 
smoke, odor, fumes, gas, vapor, lly ash, 
sewage, refose, noise or vibration, any of 
which are perceptible under normal 
conditions at any properly line 


























Other Main Uses 




30. Agriculture, horticulture, lint icultuie on lot 
of mote lhan 5 acres. See f VI.O. 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


31. Agricultural or crop land. Including the 
raising of livestock on lots of 5 acres or less, 
provided that the above shall not be 
corrslttred lo permit the operation of 
piggeries, poultry farms or establishments 
raising animals primarily for Ihe sale of Iheit 
fur. See I VI.O. 


BA 


UA 


BA 


DA 


DA 


BA 
BA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


32. Public transportation station or terminal 
escluding airports 


UA 


BA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


33. Transformer station, substation, pumping 
station, telephone eichange, telephone or 
radio repealer or other similar utility 
installation, provided lhal in any residential 
district no public business office, storage 
yard, storage buildings or motor maintenance 
installation may be operated in connection 
therewith 


DA 


DA 


UA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


34A. General removal of earth materials subject 
lo the provisions of | VI.E.l. 1 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BS 


BS 


340. Removal of regrading incidental lo 
subdivision development subject lo Ihe 
provisions of { VI.E. 1.2(a). (b). (c) 


PD 


ru 


PD 


PD 


PD 


PB 


PD 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


PB 


34C Removal or regrading incidental lo 
construction subject lo Ihe provisions of 
1 VI.E.I.2.M) 


V 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


3-1D. Miscellaneous removal of earth materials 
Incidental lo improvement subject lo Ihe 
provisions of , VI.E. 1.3 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


34E. Miscellaneous regrading subject lo Ihe 
provisions of IVI.E.M 


OS 


OS 


BS 


DS 


DS BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


BS 


33. Cemetery 


DA 


DA 


BA 


N 


N I N 


N 


BA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Accessory Uses 




36. Any accessory use, other lhan Ihosc 
hereinafter specifically mentioned, 
customarily Incidental lo • permitted 
principal use, provided lhal such accessory 
use for residences In any district shall not be 
detrimental lo Ihe neighborhood in which il b 
located, by reason of noise, odor, dusl, or 
other nuisance, trail ic generation or hazard 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 





























139 



230 



ZONING DY-LAW 



0) 


•rH 


■M 


iJ 


01 




r-\ 


^ 


0) 


0) 


a 


"7. 


n 


II 


n 


II 


V 


V 





Residence 




lln tines* 


Industrial 


SUA 


situ 


site 


AIM 


SC . |.S 


or 


i;n 


MU 


IU 


IA 


II) 


37. A child-caie facility or program piovidinf 
diy cue In moie lh»n 6 childien, us defined 
In MGL Ch. 40A. ^ 3, and licensed by Hie 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts under Hie 
provisions of Chapler 28A, subject In Hie 
provisions of | VI.S. |Amended 4-I5-I9R7 
AIM. Art «?; 4-14-1992 ATM. Art. 4U| 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


i Y 

i 

i 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


38. Use of a room or rooms In a dwelling or 
accessory building by permanent residents 
for the practice of a customary home 
occupation, provided lhal such practice does 
not involve (a) sale of articles not produced 
on the premises; (b) exterior storage or 
display; (c) alteration of the residential 
character of the premises; (d) noise, heal, 
vibration or other objectionable effects 
discernible at the properly line; or (e) the 
employment of more lhan 1 person not a 
member of Ike resident family. 1 ne following 
are some of Ihe occupations excluded from 
this definition: Beautician, barber, real estate 
salesman, dancing or musical instructor to 
mote than 1 person at a lime 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 

* : : : i 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


38A Use of a room or rooms in a detached one- 
family dwelling or .accessory building as a 
dwelling by relatives (by reason of binh or 
marriage) where there is a need by reason of 
Illness, disability or age requiring extended 
care or supervision of Ihe relative. This use 
shall be subject lo reasonable conditions and 
the requirement for renewable lime periods 
aot exceeding 5 years. 


DA 


DA 


BA 


N 


DA 


ISA 


N 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


39. Office in a dwelling for Ihe practice of a 
resident physician, lawyer or denlisl, 
provided lhal not more lhan 3 persons not 
members of Ihe resident family are regolaily 
employed therein In a technical capacity, and 
lhal such use occupies not more lhan 3J'/J% 
of (be total Door area of Ihe dwelling 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N : 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


40. Tennis or similar court or swimming pool, 
provided lhal any swimming pool shall be 
enclosed by a fence or wall, with safely gale, 
al least 5 feel high, which may be Ihe wall or 
fence of an aboveground pool If equipment 
with removable ladders 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


i 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


4 1. Roadside stand for Ihe sale of Ihe produce 
primarily from land of Ihe owner, provided 
lhal such stand shall be set back il least JO 
feel from Ibt way 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


BAi 

! * 


BA 


N 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


42. The keeping or boarding of horses, ponies, 
cows or olber latge domestic animals: 










■ <' 














A. Solely as pels or for private 
noncommercial use, provided: 

1. llial there b a minimum lot size of 2 
acres for Ihe first such animal; 

2. Thai there b a minimum of 1 additional 
acre for each additional animal up lo a 
maximum of 6 animals; 

3. Thai jny relevant Board of Health 
regulations ate met; 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 





























140 



ANDOVEIl CODrL «? 





<D 




C 


<U 


•H 


-p 


rJ 


Q) 




r-t 


? 


0) 


a) 


a 


?. 


li 


II 


ii 


II 


V 


V 



231 





Residence 




lliislness 


Industrial 


SKA 


SIUI 


SHC 


AIT 


SO 


l„S 


or 


<JD 


MU 


1<J 


LA 


ID 


4. 1 hit any structure lm housing such 
animals which b larger lhan 6x7 led 
is localed al least SO (eel liom any 
properly line; 

J. 1 hat fencing adequate to tesliain snch 
animals is Installed and Is no closet lhan 
5 (eel lo Ihe properly line 












N 














0. Keening ot boaiding mote lhan 6 such 
animals tegatdless of ownership; or 
charging of (ees (or tiding, mining . 
lessons, bleeding or other uses of Ihe 
premises; tubjecl lo Ihe provisions ol | 
VI.0. 


DA 


DA 


DA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


BA 


BA 


43. Uses cleatly accessory and incidental lo Ihe 
petmilled commercial, manulacluting or 
Industrial nses. Including bul not limiled lo 
customer and employer parking, telail Made 
or service operations, athletic and rcslauianl 
lacililies (or employees, garage (or storage or 
repair of company-owned motor vehicles, 
showrooms 


BA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


Y 


Y 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


43A. Heliports, provided lhal it does nol 
•nteasonably Increase noise or air pollution 
In any residential loned land or near any 
noise-sensitive use auch as, bul nrrl limited lo, 
hospitals, test homes, clinics, health cate 
offices, educational (acilllies, and (urlher 
provided lhal Ihe heliport design has been 
reviewed by Ihe Federal Aviation 
Adminislialion and Massachusetts 
Aetonaulics Commission 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


UA 


DA 


DA 


N 


BA 


BA 


BA 


43D. 1 he temporary and seasonal placement ol 
tables and chairs outside a permilled 
commercial structure (or Ihe convenience ol 
paltons and other shoppers, as a use 
incidental and accessory lo a permilled (ood 
or telail tales establishment where Ihe 
principal activity b Ihe service or sale ol (ood 
(or consumption on or oil Ihe premises, or 
Ihe telail sale of merchandise. Outdoor table 
and chairs shall not be localed within a 
parking lot or a public iighl-o(-way and shall 
■ol interfere with pedesltian access or access 
(or emergency purposes. (Added 4-13-1992 
ATM. Art. 35] 


N 


N 


N 


N 


DA 


UA 


N 


BA 


BA 


BA 


N 


N 


44. Advertising signs or devices subject lo Ihe 
requirements of f VI.D. of Ibis bylaw 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


45. Ihe parking or keeping ol a truck or 

commercial-type vehicle on properly used (or 
residential purposes, provided lhal Ihe same: 
(a) Does nol exceed ihtee-fourihs-lon 

capacity, manulicturer's rating, 
(b)ls used as a means of transport lo and (rom 

Ihe resident's place o( business, 

(c) Is parked or kept in a closed garage, and 

(d) Is nol loaded with flammable, noiioos. ot 
dangerous material 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 






















» 







141 



Z3Z 



ZONING BY-LAW 9 





c 


0J 


•H 


4J : 


tJ 


Ql 




i-l 


:* 


0) 


OJ 


u 


5% 


II 


II 


II 


II 


V 


V 





Residence 




llirsirress 


Industrial 


SKA 


SUB 


SRC 


ATI- 


SC 


I.S 


Ol' 


Gil 


MU 


1U 


IA 


ID 


46. Wilh dwellings in all districts. Ilic parking of 
keeping of commercial-type vehicle* of 
equipment older than those allowed in 
Paragraph 45 above, provided that such 
parking will ml, under the circumstances, be 
detrimental to the neighborhood; and 
provided limber that such use may he 
permitted subject to conditions deemed 
necessary to safeguard the neighborhood. 
Including limitations of lime, number of 
vehicles, weight or capacity of vehicles 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


I1A 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


47A. The parking or keeping of equipment or 
vehicles, or the maintenance of temporary 
buildings on construction sites for a period 
not to exceed 1 year, provided that a permit 
has been issued by the Oullding Inspector 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 
N 

DA 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


47B. lite nse of a mobile home is a temporary 
dwelling on the tile of a single-family 
residence which has been desttoyed or 
tendered uninhabitable by fire or other 
catastrophe; provided lhal a temporary permit 
for a period not lo exceed 6 months is issued 
by the Duilding Inspector with Ihe approval 
of Ihe Director of Health and Ihe Town 
Manager. If reconstruction of Ihe original 
dwelling is not completed in 6 months, such 
permit may be removed for an additional 6 
months on concurrence of Ihe above 3 
persons, but in no event may such mobile 
home remain on Ihe site In excess of 1 year 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


N 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


48. Accessory scientific uses (See § VI J) 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


DA 


49. Towers for securing wind-energy 

conversion systems designated lo service Ihe 
principal use subject lo Ihe provisions of 
} VI.M, Towers for wind-energy conversion 
systems 


BA 


DA 


DA 


N 


BA 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


BA 


50. (Amended 4-12-1988 AIM, Arl. 9J| 
Communications Structure, which shall he 
subject to Ihe provisions of | VI.N of this 
bylaw: 


























(a) Tower for securing amateur 

communication anlenna(s) designed lo 
service Ihe principal use 


DA 


DA 


DA 


N 


BA 


1)A 


N 


N 


N 


N 


BA 


BA 


(b) Dish antenna, which is a device 

Incorporating a reflective surface lhal is 
bar configured or Is solid or open mesh in 
Ihe shape of a shallow dish, cone, horn or 
cornucopia. Such device shall be used lo 
transmit and/or receive radio or 
clecttomagnelic waves between 
terrestrially and/or otbitally based uses 


DA 


DA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


BA 


DA 


DA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


SI. Family day-care home in a private residence 
whete a resident of Ihe ptemises provides day 
care on a regular basis for 6 or fewer 
children, licensed by Ihe Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under Ihe provisions of MGL 
Ch. 28A, as amended. Family day-cate home 
•hall not mean a private residence used for an 
informal cooperative arrangement among 
neighbors, friends or relatives, or Ihe 
occasional care of children with or without 
compensation (Amended 4-6-1988 ATM, 
Arl. 66| 


Y 


Y 


Y 


BA 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 



142 



ANDOVER CODE 9 





U) 




C 


<u 


•H 


+J 


,-4 


ID 




•-i 


t* 


0) 


(11 


u 


■z. 


II 


II 


II 


II 


V 


V 



23 





Itesldence 


lluslness 


Industrial 


SKA 


situ 


SRC 


AIT 


SC 


l.S OP 


<JD 


MU 


IV 


1A 


ID 


51 The icmpomjr use ol residential premises 
for sale of crilu subject lo • pe mill Issued by 
the Inspector of Dulldinf s for up lo two 
consecoilve days only and limited lo two 
permits per calendar year for any given 
premises (A.liled 9 JO 1991 A 1 M, Art. SJ 

53- Storage of 1 Mtr|citieted vehicle or of 1 
vehicle nol In condition for Iravel, snlijecl lo 
the provisions of | Vl.T (Added 4-1J-1992 
AIM. Art. 371 


Y 


Y 


Y 
~ Y — 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 



143 



J'/j 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWK MEETING 



APRIL 13. 1994 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
59 as printed in the Warrant. 



VOTE: 



YES: 224 



NO: 27 



A 2/3 vote required 



Selectmen's Report: 
Planning Board Report: 



Approval 
Approval 



ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to require that, 
henceforth, the Selectman shall lay out no street in the Town of 
Andover constructed within the boundaries of a right-of-way less 
than fifty feet in width. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 60 was DEFEATED 



Selectmen's Report: 
Planning Board Report: 



Disapproval 
Disapproval 



ARTICLE 61.' To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, 
Section VIII. A. of the Andover Zoning By-law, by deleting the 
following subsection in its entirety: 

"6. The Building Inspector shall have power to certify that 
a particular lot or a particular structure is a legal 
preexisting nonconforming lot or nonconforming structure 
within the meaning of the Zoning Act and of the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, as from time-to-time amended, whenever he 
receives a written request from the owner thereof, or his 
representative, for such a certification for the 
following purposes: 

a. A sale of the lot or structure; 

b. Financing of improvements upon the lot or of 
improvements, repairs, or renovations on or 
within a structure on the lot; 

c. A mortgage upon the lot or structure; 

d. Administration of estates; 

In exercising this power, the Building Inspector shall 
adopt, and may from time-to-time amend, such forms of 
application for such certification and for his 
certification as he deems reasonable to this provision. 
The fee for the issuance of the certification shall be 
set by the Selectmen." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
61 as printed in the Warrant. 



VOTE: 



YES: 230 



Selectmen's Report: 
Planning Board Report: 



NO: 2 

Approval 
Approval 



A 2/3 vote required 



ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds or raise by taxation a sum not to exceed $100,000 
for the purpose of beginning the process of conducting an 
independent outside management audit of all departments of the Town 
of Andover; to identify ways to increase efficiency in the delivery 
of services and reduce the cost of operations. 

On petition of Dennis A. Teves and others. 



144 



35 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote 
to transfer from available funds the sum of $100,000 for the 
purpose of beginning the process of conducting an independent 
outside management audit of all departments of the Town of Andover, 
to identify ways to increase efficiency in the delivery of service 
and reduce the cost of operations. In the first year the 
departments to be audited will be the Department of Municipal 
Maintenance and the Department of Public Works. 

Article 62 was DEFEATED 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, 
custody, management and control of a parcel of land hereinafter 
described, and the improvements, if any thereon, held by the Board 
of Selectmen and/or the Department of Public Works to the Board of 
Selectmen, for the purpose of conveyance of said land to Genetics 
Institute, Inc. , in exchange for the conveyance of certain land by 
Genetics Institute, Inc. to the Town for conservation purposes 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C and 
to authorize the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court for special legislation authorizing said 
conveyances: 

Land to be conveyed by the Town: 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, 
Massachusetts, being shown as Lot A on a plan entitled, "Plan of 
Land in Andover, Massachusetts," prepared for the Town of Andover, 
scale: 1" =40', dated January 12, 1994 by Martinage Engineering 
Associates, Inc., Civil-Environmental Engineers & Land Surveyors, 
131 Main Street, Reading, MA, and containing .990 acres, more or 
less. Said Lot A is to be conveyed subject to the rights of 
others, if any, in the existing brook which crosses the premises as 
shown on said plan and subject to such further restrictions as the 
Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover. 

Land to be conveyed to the Town: 

A certain parcel of land in the Town of Andover, Essex County, 
Massachusetts, being shown as Lot Y on a plan entitled, "Plan of 
Land in Andover, Massachusetts," prepared for Genetics Institute, 
scale: 1" =40', dated January 11, 1994 by Martinage Engineering 
Associates, Inc., Civil-Environmental Engineers & Land Surveyors, 
131 Main Street, Reading, MA, and containing 1.112 acres, more or 
less. Said Lot Y is to be conveyed subject to: (1) all easements 
and encumbrances of record; (2) an easement in favor of Genetics 
Institute, Inc., its successors and assigns, for drainage and slope 
purposes; and (3) such further restrictions and reservations as the 
Selectmen deem advisable in the interest of the Town of Andover; or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
63 as printed in the Warrant by a UNANIMOUS vote. 

Planning Board Report: Approval 
Selectmen Report: Approval 



145 



236 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following 
bylaw for the regulation of the proceedings at all annual and 
special Town Meetings of the Town of Andover: 

Closure shall require a motion from the floor and a two-thirds 
vote, and shall not be permitted until at least three voters 
in favor of a subject and three voters opposed to it have been 
given the opportunity to obtain the floor and speak. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 64 was DEFEATED 



ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $1,000,000 for 
the installation of a sanitary sewer line in River Road from North 
Street to the Lawrence townline and to authorize 
the Town to acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase, 
or by seizure by right of eminent domain. Betterments are to be 
assessed. 

On petition of Blanche Fortuna and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of 
$1,000,000 be hereby appropriated for the installation of a 
sanitary sewer line in River Road from North Street to the Lawrence 
town line, including costs incidental and related thereto, that the 
Selectmen be authorized to acquire any necessary easements by gift, 
by purchase or taking by eminent domain, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow not exceeding $1,000,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the General Laws, as amended and 
supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor and that betterments shall be 
assessed. 

Article 65 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES: 35 N0:161 A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, 
Section 11. (n) (1) of the General By-laws by deleting the first 
sentence in its entirety and inserting the following: 

"The fees for all dog licenses shall be $8.00." 

and by deleting May 1 in the second sentence and inserting the 
following: 

"March 1." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
66 as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectmen's Report: Approval 



146 



237 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13. 1994 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $500,000, or any other 
sum, for the acquisition by purchase or taking by eminent domain of 
land and improvements thereon at 400 South Main Street (Map 62, 
Lots 31 & 31A) within the Town for municipal purposes, including 
costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Article 67 was WITHDRAWN 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel, Thomas Urbelis, and duly seconded 
it was voted by a Majority vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting 
at 10:30 P.M. 



ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



147 



SPECIAL TOWK ELECTION MAY 17, 1994 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION - KAY 17 1994 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on April 12, 1994 
the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Elections 
and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling 
place. All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, 
Six, Seven, Eight, are to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High 
School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE SEVENTEENTH DAY OF MAY, 1994 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the 
following Questions: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each school house and in no less than five other 
public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 

The total number of ballots cast was 77 65, viz: 

Prec. 1 - 841 Prec. 2 - 892 Prec. 3 - 844 Prec. 4 -1031 
Prec. 5 -1108 Prec. 6 -1050 Prec. 7 -1041 Prec. 8 - 958 



490 337 431 536 662 604 632 513 

348 548 412 494 446 443 408 444 

37110311 



8_ QUESTION 1 



8 



450 315 395 514 616 538 573 469 
386 567 443 515 492 507 466 486 
5 10 620523 
***Recount held June 6, 1994 on question 2 (see next page) . 



YES 


4205 


NO 


3543 


Blanks 


17 


QUESTION 2 




YES 


3870 


NO 


3862 


Blanks 


33 



148 



239 



RECOUNT OF SPECIAL ELECTION QUESTION 2 JUNE 6. 1994 



QUESTION 1 

Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to exempt from the provisions 
of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to 
pay for the bonds issued in order to remodel, reconstruct or make 
extraordinary repairs to Andover High School, the South Elementary 
School and Sanborn Elementary School, and to construct, equip and 
furnish additions to those schools, including outside work and 
other costs incidental and related to the projects? 

QUESTION 2 
Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to exempt from the provisions 
of proposition two and one-half, so called, the amounts required to 
pay for the bonds issued in order to complete the installation of 
wiring, computer networks, and other technology systems at Bancroft 
Elementary School, West Elementary School, Shawsheen School, 
Doherty Middle School, West Middle School, and the Central 
Administration office, including equipment and other costs related 
thereto? 

RECOUNT: JUNE 6. 1994 

RECOUNT OF QUESTION 2 OF MAY 17, 1994 SPECIAL ELECTION ON PETITION 
OF WILLIAM CODERRE OF 37 STINSON ROAD, ANDOVER MA. 

The recount was held on Monday, June 6, 1994 at the Town House on 
Main Street at 9:30 A.M. 

The final count of Question 2 was as follows: 


The total number of ballots cast was 7765, viz: 

Prec. 1 - 841 Prec. 2 - 892 Prec. 3 - 844 Prec. 4 -1031 
Prec. 5 -1108 Prec. 6 -1050 Prec. 7 -1041 Prec. 8 - 958 



8_ QUESTION 2 



450 315 395 514 616 538 573 469 YES 3870 

386 567 444 515 492 508 466 486 NO 3864 

5 10 52042 3 Blanks 31 



149 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1994 
REPUBLICAN PARTY TOTAL: 21 85 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 


TOTAL 


29 


29 


37 


20 


37 


24 


34 


27 


John R. Lakian 


237 


245 


252 


243 


240 


212 


210 


208 


308 


W. Min Romney 


1918 


6 


4 


6 


4 


2 


1 


2 


5 


Blanks 
GOVERNOR 


30 


265 


268 


263 


245 


235 


224 


225 


324 


Wiliam F. WeW 


2049 




















1 





George A. Bachrach 


1 























1 


William E Ungard 


1 


15 


17 


23 


19 


16 


11 


18 


15 


Blanks 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 


134 


243 


257 


253 


228 


224 


220 


219 


301 


A/geo Paul Ceflucci 


1945 


37 


28 


33 


36 


27 


15 


25 


39 


Blanks 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 


240 


160 


192 


178 


173 


138 


153 


163 


223 


Janis M. Berry 


1380 


70 


54 


60 


51 


62 


48 


58 


70 


Guy A. Cartoone 


473 























1 


Mark B. Johnson 


1 


50 


39 


46 


40 


51 


34 


23 


46 


Blanks 

SECRETARY Of STATE 


331 


107 


132 


123 


100 


95 


86 


91 


134 


Arthur E Chase 


868 


123 


114 


119 


111 


99 


107 


115 


148 


Peier V. Forman 


936 























1 


David B. Soule 


1 


50 


39 


44 


53 


57 


42 


38 


57 


Blanks 
TREASURER 


380 


233 


237 


235 


219 


206 


207 


206 


304 


Joseph Daniel Maione 


1847 




















1 





Jonathan Jenkins 


1 


47 


48 


51 


45 


45 


28 


37 


36 


Blanks 
AUDTTOR 


337 


161 


147 


155 


129 


109 


123 


130 


191 


Forester A. 'Tim' Clark. Jr. 


1145 


44 


57 


59 


55 


58 


54 


53 


75 


Earie B. Stroll 


455 


75 


81 


72 


80 


84 


58 


61 


74 


Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


585 


189 


193 


195 


174 


168 


165 


174 


259 


David E Coleman 


1517 


91 


92 


91 


90 


83 


70 


70 


81 


Blanks 
COUNCILLOR 


668 


182 


183 


193 


163 


155 


160 


172 


242 


John Michael Walsh 


1450 


98 


102 


93 


101 


96 


75 


72 


96 


Blanks 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 


735 


207 


200 


215 


188 


174 


178 


193 


263 


Maria Marasco 


1618 








2 

















Carl F. Grygiel 


2 


73 


85 


69 


76 


77 


57 


51 


77 


Blanks 


565 



225 


236 


234 


227 


206 


211 


307 


55 


49 


52 


37 


29 


33 


33 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Seventeenth Essex District 
Gary M. Coon 1646 

Blanks 288 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Eghteenth Middlesex District 
158 Roy F. Nagle 158 

93 Blanks 93 



2185 



280 


285 


286 


264 


251 


235 


244 


340 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
Blanks 



IV. 



285 



286 



264 



251 



235 



244 


1 
339 


CLERK OF COURTS 
Bruce Shook 
Blanks 



1 
2184 



150 













REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY 














SEPTEMBER 20. 


1994 






















REGISTER OF DEEDS 

























1 


Henry Petrlllo 


1 


280 


285 


286 


264 


251 


235 


244 


339 


Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 


2184 


92 


79 


88 


81 


69 


65 


67 


96 


Charles J. Chlsholm 


637 


45 


51 


53 


42 


59 


37 


46 


61 


Barton K. Hyte 


394 


83 


86 


84 


64 


64 


76 


79 


102 


Frederick H. 'Ted" Tarr 


638 


60 


69 


61 


77 


59 


57 


52 


81 


Blanks 


516 



151 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 20. 1994 
DEMOCRATIC PARTY TOTAL 2107 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 


TOTAL 


304 


224 


243 


185 


137 


144 


152 


202 


Edward M. Kennedy 


1591 














1 











W. Mitt Romney 


1 


67 


74 


62 


78 


67 


74 


35 


58 


Blanks 
GOVERNOR 


515 


102 


64 


74 


67 


59 


65 


44 


69 


George A. Bachrach 


544 


69 


53 


51 


51 


35 


37 


36 


39 


Michael J. Barrett 


371 


141 


142 


142 


100 


78 


79 


84 


122 


Mark Roosevelt 


888 























1 


Tom Hail 


1 














1 











William F. Weld 


1 


59 


39 


38 


45 


32 


37 


23 


29 


Blanks 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 


302 


101 


97 


97 


82 


44 


62 


70 


76 


Marc D. Dralsen 


629 


154 


114 


131 


93 


99 


76 


73 


104 


Robert K. Massie 


844 


116 


87 


77 


88 


62 


80 


44 


80 


Blanks 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 


634 


295 


239 


253 


207 


163 


155 


143 


219 


L. Scott Harshbarger 


1674 


76 


59 


52 


56 


42 


63 


44 


41 


Blanks 

SECRETARY OF STATE 


433 


176 


150 


147 


121 


93 


101 


79 


112 


William Francis Gavin 


979 


110 


83 


96 


81 


60 


63 


73 


86 


Augusto F. Grace 


652 


85 


65 


62 


61 


52 


54 


35 


62 


Blanks 
TREASURER 


476 


227 


185 


204 


163 


123 


131 


127 


166 


Shannon P. O'Brien 


1326 


144 


113 


101 


100 


82 


87 


60 


94 


Blanks 
AUDITOR 


781 


231 


189 


199 


167 


127 


139 


118 


169 


A. Joseph DeNucci 


1339 


140 


109 


106 


96 


78 


79 


69 


91 


Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


768 


277 


205 


234 


191 


146 


158 


140 


194 


Martin T. Meehan 


1545 


52 


44 


38 


34 


40 


35 


20 


44 


Thomas J. Quinn 


307 


42 


49 


33 


38 


19 


25 


27 


22 


Blanks 
COUNCILLOR 


255 


34 


39 


27 


27 


17 


19 


25 


31 


Edward J. Carroll 


219 


12 


8 


10 


7 


5 


12 


6 


13 


Paul Dellos 


73 


183 


138 


161 


126 


110 


104 


95 


133 


Patricia A. Dowling 


1050 


142 


113 


107 


103 


73 


83 


61 


83 


Blanks 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 


765 


288 


199 


237 


180 


148 


137 


141 


206 


John D. O'Brien. Jr. 


1536 


7 


6 


5 


6 


2 


10 


3 


8 


Edward J. Bishop, Jr. 


47 


36 


45 


22 


35 


29 


44 


21 


24 


Frank J. Gorman 


256 


40 


48 


41 


42 


26 


27 


22 


22 


Blanks 


268 






1 





























1 























1 





371 


297 


305 


263 


217 


186 


260 



88 
67 
50 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Seventeenth Essex District 

Robert E Engel 1 

Barry Flnegotd 1 

Peter McCarthy 1 

Blanks 1699 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Eighteenth Middlesex District 
Edward A. LeLacheur 88 

Leo 'Buckles* Nolan 67 

Blanks 50 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 
267 215 231 198 148 142 133 192 Kevin M. Burke 
104 83 74 65 57 76 54 68 Blanks 



1526 
581 



152 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY 
SEPTEMBER 20. 1994 



















CLERK OF COURTS 




234 


200 


203 


164 


130 


137 


119 


170 


James Dennis Leary 


1357 


137 


98 


102 


99 


75 


81 


68 


90 


Blanks 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 


750 


253 


210 


212 


181 


143 


146 


128 


180 


Thomas J. Burke 


1453 


116 


88 


93 


82 


62 


72 


59 


80 


Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 


654 


49 


45 


39 


32 


29 


34 


32 


26 


Christopher T. Casey 


286 


47 


51 


45 


35 


32 


32 


24 


35 


Christie (Chris) Clampa, Jr. 


301 


122 


110 


122 


99 


71 


72 


57 


83 


Ronald Francis Ford 


736 


18 


11 


13 


14 


14 


19 


16 


25 


Anibal *Tex" Teixelra 


130 


135 


81 


86 


83 


59 


61 


58 


91 


Blanks 


654 



153 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 8. 1994 

STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 8, 1994 

The total number of ballots cast was 13,954, viz 

Prec. 1 - 1643 Prec. 2 - 1736 Prec. 3 - 1638 Prec. 4 - 1748 
Prec. 5 - 1883 Prec. 6 - 1787 Prec. 7 - 1665 Prec. 8 - 1854 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 U.S. SENATOR TOTAL 

641 812 814 749 764 765 759 761 Edward M. Kennedy 6265 

770 891 789 973 1091 997 881 1054 W. Mitt Romney 7446 

8 9 10 3 8 9 3 15 Lauraieigh Dozier 65 
1113 12 2 William A. Ferguson 11 

23 23 24 20 20 15 20 22 BLANKS 167 

GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

1220 1333 1240 1419 1551 1467 1320 1476 Weld and Cellucl 11026 

377 354 356 295 307 285 312 340 Roosevelt and Massie 2626 

9 7 15 7 7 10 6 12 Cook and Crawford 73 
110 1111 Rebello and Glske 6 
1 All Others 1 
37 41 26 27 17 24 26 24 BLANKS 222 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

1022 1033 1008 1026 1057 1013 985 1030 L Scott Harshbarger 8174 

446 550 498 580 682 641 558 696 JanlsM. Berry 4651 

175 153 132 142 144 133 122 128 BLANKS 1129 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

950 Arthur E. Chase 6413 

623 William Francis GaMn 5240 

53 Peter C. Everett 373 

228 BLANKS 1928 

TREASURER 

1103 1209 1094 1256 1396 1334 1202 1371 Joseph Daniel Malone 9965 

413 389 428 360 362 345 377 360 Shannon Patricia O'Brien 3034 

20 23 29 22 27 17 22 24 Susan B. Poulln 184 

17 30 26 17 24 22 13 24 Thomas P. Tierney 173 

90 85 61 93 74 69 51 75 BLANKS 598 



154 



666 


789 


684 


794 


878 


863 


789 


670 


657 


669 


663 


678 


647 


633 


46 


38 


60 


40 


53 


43 


40 


261 


252 


225 


251 


274 


234 


203 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


907 


933 


945 


935 


967 


958 


520 


569 


511 


603 


689 


646 


34 


49 


33 


32 


40 


33 


182 


165 


149 


178 


187 


150 



876 


869 


893 


872 


922 


861 


549 


648 


552 


642 


715 


724 


218 


219 


193 


234 


246 


202 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 8. 1994 



7 8 AUDITOR 

908 910 A. Joseph DoNuccI 7463 

605 738 Forrester A. *Tlm' Clark. Jr. 4901 

34 45 Geoff M.Weil 300 

118 161 BLANKS 1290 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

1070 1074 1044 1074 1131 1041 1028 1040 Martin T. Meehan 8502 

465 557 505 572 653 656 562 687 David E Coleman 4657 

108 105 89 102 99 90 75 127 BLANKS 795 

COUNCILLOR 

842 839 Patricia A. Dowtlng 6974 

633 784 John Michael Walsh 5247 

190 231 BLANKS 1733 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

820 John D. O'Brien 6910 

943 Maria Marasco 6386 

91 BLANKS 658 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Seventeenth Essex District 

1206 1361 1247 1381 1450 1324 1499 GaryM.Coon 9468 

437 375 391 367 337 341 355 BLANKS 2603 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
Eighteenth Middlesex District 

686 Edward A. LeLacheur 686 

901 Roy F. Nagle 901 

296 BLANKS 296 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

1110 1193 1188 1164 1229 1228 1131 1219 Kevin M.Burke 9462 
00000003 All Others 3 

533 543 450 584 654 559 534 632 BLANKS 4489 



932 


898 


892 


845 


856 


862 


805 


610 


776 


666 


814 


918 


861 


798 


101 


62 


80 


89 


109 


64 


62 



155 



1 


2 


3 


4 


929 


979 


966 


950 














714 


757 


672 


798 



623 


656 


653- 


600 


576 


598 


627 


760 


646 


748 


884 


825 


83 


56 


71 


62 


54 


78 


310 


264 


268 


338 


369 


286 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 8, 1994 

5 6 7 8 CLERK OF COURTS 

1154 1012 989 1034 James Dennis Leary 8013 

2 All Others 2 

729 775 676 818 BLANKS 5939 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

948 1012 1010 996 1201 1045 964 1033 Thomas J. Burke 8209 

00000002 All Others 2 

695 724 628 752 682 742 701 819 BLANKS 5743 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

575 535 Christopher T. Casey 4816 

751 913 Frederick H. 'Ted' Tarr 6154 

84 89 Bryan R. Dellollo 577 

255 317 BLANKS 2407 



QUESTION 1 

565 607 582 509 633 605 605 633 Yes 4739 

992 1021 975 1169 1177 1107 1006 1159 No 8606 

86 108 81 70 73 75 54 62 BLANKS 609 

QUESTION 2 

1081 1030 1034 1110 1246 1138 1119 1230 Yes 8988 

495 627 551 587 580 585 526 574 No 4525 

67 79 53 51 57 64 20 50 BLANKS 441 



7270 
5486 
1198 

QUESTION 4 

1104 1034 934 1072 Yes 7745 

702 660 680 707 No 5539 

77 93 51 75 BLANKS 670 



















QUESTION 3 


817 


896 


841 


917 


1016 


907 


882 


994 


Yes 


676 


675 


641 


692 


702 


728 


656 


716 


No 


150 


165 


156 


139 


165 


152 


127 


144 


BLANKS 



836 


933 


848 


984 


717 


686 


704 


683 


90 


117 


86 


81 



156 



STATE ELECTION - NOVEMBER 8. 1994 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 QUESTIONS 

991 1081 940 1113 1291 1155 1054 1153 Yes 8778 

602 593 650 585 548 584 592 667 No 4821 

50 62 48 50 44 48 19 34 BLANKS 355 

QUESTION 6 

441 431 437 286 324 332 328 333 Yes 2912 

1146 1235 1143 1398 1507 1410 1304 1476 No 10619 

56 70 58 64 52 45 33 45 BLANKS 423 

QUESTION 7 

411 396 415 280 310 302 306 313 Yes 2733 

1162 1245 1156 1402 1517 1434 1316 1491 No 10723 

70 95 67 66 56 51 43 50 BLANKS 498 

QUESTION 8 

1142 1230 1211 1282 1432 1330 1247 1374 Yes 10248 

406 393 350 392 361 374 357 407 No 3040 

95 113 77 74 90 83 61 73 BLANKS 666 



7852 
5307 
795 



















QUESTION 9 


845 


899 


886 


1027 


1123 


1022 


991 


1059 


Yes 


691 


705 


661 


642 


640 


668 


601 


699 


No 


107 


132 


91 


79 


120 


97 


73 


96 


BLANKS 



157 



QUESTION il REGULATING SPENDING ON BALLOT QUESTION CAMPAIGNS 

This proposed law would limit the way in which business and 
certain nonprofit corporations could contribute to and spend 
money on campaigns involving an initiative, referendum or other 
question submitted to the voters at a state or local election. 
The proposed law would require ballot committees organized to 
support or oppose any question submitted to the voters to 
disclose promptly certain contributions made late in the 
campaign; would establish procedures that business and certain 
nonprofit corporations would have to follow in order to spend 
money on ballot question campaigns; and would establish voluntary 
spending limits for ballot committees. 

The proposed law would require a ballot committee to report to 
the state Office of Campaign and Political Finance, within one 
business day of receipt, the name, address, occupation and 
employer of any person or organization making a contribution of 
$1,000 or more, if the contribution was made before the date of 
the election but after the closing date of the last official 
campaign contribution report. 

Under the proposed law, business and certain nonprofit 
corporations would be prohibited from making contributions or 
expenditures to support or oppose a ballot question, but would be 
permitted to create and solicit contributions to a separate fund 
to be used to support or oppose a ballot question. A separate 
fund would be required for each ballot question on which the 
corporation intended to solicit contributions. The corporation 
would be required to report all amounts spent to establish and 
administer the fund to the Office of Campaign and Political 
Finance, and to a city or town if the fund were established to 
influence the vote on a local ballot question. 

Contributions to the separate fund could be solicited only from 
members or stockholders, officer and directors, and employees at 
a policy making, managerial or professional level. Coercion, job 
discrimination and financial reprisals as methods of soliciting 
contributions would be prohibited. Nonprofit corporations that 
are formed for the purpose of promoting political ideas, do not 
engage in business activities, have no shareholders, and do not 
have business corporations as members or accept more than one 
percent of their revenues from such corporations would be exempt 
from these provisions. A business organization that violated 
these requirements could be fined up to $50,000, and any director 
or agent of a business organization who violates or authorizes 
the violation of these requirements could be fined up to $10,000 
and/or imprisoned for up to one year. 

The proposed law would establish voluntary spending limits for 
ballot committees at $1,000,000 in the year of an election, and 
$250,000 in the years immediately before and after an election. 
Ballot committees agreeing to observe these voluntary limits 
would be permitted to announce their compliance on advertisements 
and campaign materials. Ballot committees that agreed to observe 
the spending limits and later exceeded the limits could be fined 
up to $10,000. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were 
declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

QUESTION «2 BEAT BELT LAW 

This law requires drivers and passengers in certain motor 
vehicles on public ways to wear properly adjusted and fastened 
safety belts. The law applies to persons driving or riding in 
private passenger motor vehicles or riding in vanpool vehicles or 
trucks under 18,000 pounds. It also applies to employees of 
cities, towns, counties, and districts. The law does not apply 



158 



STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 1994 cont : 

to: (1) children under twelve years old who are required by 
another state law to use safety belts or other child passenger 
restraints; (2) vehicles manufactured before July 1, 1966; (3) 
persons certified by a physician as physically unable to use 
safety belts; (4) U.S. Postal Service rural carriers while 
performing their duties; (5) persons involved in operating 
taxies, liveries, tractors, trucks of 18,000 pounds or more, 
buses; or (6) passengers in authorized emergency vehicles. 

The law is enforced by law enforcement agencies only when a 
driver has been stopped for a motor vehicle violation or some 
other offense. A driver and each passenger 16 years old or older 
may be fined $25 for not using a safety belt when required. A 
driver may also be fined $25 for each passenger between 12 and 16 
years old who is not using a safety belt when required. A person 
who receives a citation for violating the law may challenge it 
using the same procedure that applies to most other automobile 
law violations. A violation is not considered a moving violation 
for motor vehicle insurance surcharge purposes. 

The law directs the state Registrar of Motor Vehicles to require 
police officers, when reporting automobile accidents, to record 
whether safety belts were used. The law directs the Governor's 
Highway Safety Bureau to (1) conduct a public information and 
education program on motor vehicle occupant protection; (2) 
evaluate and report to the Legislature, by June 1, 1995, on the 
effectiveness of and degree of compliance with the law; and (3) 
make annual surveys of safety belt use. 

The law requires the state Commissioner of Insurance to evaluate, 
report, and make recommendations to the Legislature concerning 
the effectiveness of the law and the frequency of bodily injury 
claims during the law's first year of operation. The 
Commissioner must also require at least a 5% reduction in bodily 
injury insurance premiums if the observed safety belt use rate 
among all vehicle occupants is 50% or more after the law's first 
year of operation. The Commissioner is required to take into 
account the annual safety belt use survey results in future 
decisions setting bodily injury premiums, and the Commissioner 
must further reduce those premiums if the safety belt use rate in 
Massachusetts exceeds the national average. 

The law provides that failure to wear a properly fastened safety 
belt may not be considered as contributory negligence or used as 
evidence in any civil lawsuit. It also states that no insurance 
company may either (1) deny coverage to a person who failed to 
wear a safety belt during an accident that lead to bodily injury, 
or (2) refuse to issue a motor vehicle liability policy based on 
a violation of this law. 

QUESTION t3 CHANGING THE LAW REGARDING STUDENT FEES 

This law eliminates one of the two ways in which students may 
authorize fees to be assessed on tuition bills at state-operated 
colleges and universities to support nonpartisan student 
organizations that attempt to influence state legislation. 

The law applies to community and state colleges and the 
University of Massachusetts. The law takes the place of previous 
law that allowed a student body, by a majority vote in an 
official student body referendum, to authorize a "waivable fee," 
or (state colleges and the University) an "optional fee," to be 
collected for such nonpartisan student organizations. Under this 
law, the boards of trustees at community and state colleges and 
the University are prohibited from collecting waivable fees and 
may only collect optional fees for such organizations. 



159 



STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 1994 cont: 

A "waivable fee" is collected when authorized by a majority of 
those students voting in an official student body referendum. A 
waivable fee is an amount payable on a tuition bill, appearing as 
a separately assessed item and accompanied by a statement that 
the fee is not a charge required to be paid by the student but 
rather that the student may deduct the charge from the total 
amount due. The tuition bill also explains the nature of the fee 
and states that the fee appears on the bill at the request of the 
student body and does not necessarily reflect the endorsement of 
the board of trustees. 

An "optional fee" is collected when authorized by a majority of 
those students voting in an official student body referendum. An 
optional fee is an amount payable on a tuition bill, appearing as 
a separately assessed item and accompanied by a statement that 
the fee is not a charge required to be paid by the student but 
rather that the student may add the charge to the total amount 
due. The tuition bill also explains the nature of the fee and 
states that the fee appears on the bill at the request of the 
student body and does not necessarily reflect the endorsement of 
the board of trustees. 



QUESTION #4 TERM LIMITS 

This proposed law would prevent the name of a person from being 
printed on a state primary or general election ballot as a 
candidate for one of a number of specified state and federal 
public offices, if the person had already served a certain number 
of consecutive terms in that office within a fixed period 
preceding the end of the then-current term of office. If such a 
person were still elected by write-in vote to one of the state 
offices (except the office of Governor) , the person would serve 
without a salary, and in some of the state offices, without 
payment for certain expenses. 

Under the proposed law, the name of a person could not be printed 
on a primary or general election ballot as a candidate for the 
office of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, 
State Treasurer, State Auditor, or State Attorney General, if the 
person had served two consecutive terms (eight years) in that 
office in the eleven years prior to the end of the then-current 
term of office. The name of a person could not be printed on a 
primary or general election ballot as a candidate for the office 
of Governor's Councillor, State Representative, State Senator, or 
United States Representative from Massachusetts, if the person 
had served four consecutive terms (eight years) in that office in 
the nine years prior to the end of the then-current term of 
office. The name of a person could not be printed on a primary 
or general election ballot as a candidate for the office of 
United States Senator from Massachusetts, if the person had 
served two consecutive terms (twelve years) in that office in the 
seventeen years prior to the end of the then-current term of 
office. The proposed law would not prevent any voter from 
casting a write-in vote for any person as a candidate for any 
office. 

If a person made ineligible by the proposed law to have his or 
her name printed on the ballot as a candidate for the office of 
Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, State 
Auditor, State Attorney General, Governor's Councillor, State 
Representative or State Senator were still elected to that office 
by write-in vote, the person would serve without a salary. If 
such a person were elected to the office of Lieutenant Governor, 
Governor's Councillor, State Representative or State Senator, the 
person would also serve without payment for certain expenses. 



16T) 



STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 199 4 cont: 

The current terms of the persons serving as Governor, Lieutenant 
Governor, Governor's Councillor, State Representative, State 
Senator, United States Representative from Massachusetts, and 
United States Senator from Massachusetts, would not be counted 
for purposes of the proposed law. The terms of the persons 
elected in 1990 to the office of Secretary of State, State 
Treasurer, State Auditor, or State Attorney General would be 
counted. 

Any person who served more than half of a term in an office would 
be treated as having served a full term in that office. Any 
person who resigned from an office would be treated as having 
served a full term. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were found 
invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

QUESTION #5 OPENING OF RETAIL STORES ON SUNDAY MORNING AND 
CERTAIN HOLIDAYS 

This proposed law would allow retail stores to open at any time 
on Sundays and on the legal holidays of Memorial Day, July 
Fourth, and Labor Day. It would not affect current restrictions 
on the sale of alcoholic beverages on Sundays and these holidays. 
Stores opening under the proposed law would be required to make 
Sunday and holiday work voluntary and would be required to pay 
most employees at least one and one-half times their regular 
rate. 



QUESTION 16 GRADUATED INCOME TAX 

This proposed constitutional amendment would require 
Massachusetts income tax rates to be graduated, in order to 
distribute the burden of the tax fairly and equitably. The 
proposed amendment would require the rates for taxpayers in 
higher income brackets to be higher than the rates for taxpayers 
in lower income brackets. The proposed amendment would also 
allow the state Legislature to grant reasonable exemptions and 
abatements and establish the number and range of tax brackets. 
The proposed amendment would eliminate from the Massachusetts 
Constitution the present requirement that income taxes must be 
levied at a uniform rate throughout the state upon incomes 
derived from the same class of property. 

QUESTION #7 PERSONAL INCOME TAX CHANGES 

This proposed law would change the state personal income tax laws 
if a proposed amendment to the Massachusetts Constitution 
requiring income tax rates to be graduated is approved at the 
1994 state election. This proposed law would (1) set graduated 
income tax rates to replace the existing tax rate structure, (2) 
change exemptions and deductions relating to dependents, child 
care expenses, head of household status and personal exemptions, 
(3) establish a property tax and water rate credit of up to $200 
for taxpayers below certain income levels, (4) increase the 
maximum income levels for no-tax status and the limited income 
credit, (5) establish a "capital formation incentive" to replace 
the existing capital gains exclusion, and (6) provide that 
taxpayers will not pay more Massachusetts income tax for 1995 
than they would have paid under 1992 law, if their 1995 adjusted 
gross income is below certain levels (for instance, $60,000 for 
single filers and $100,000 for married couples filing jointly) 



1151 



STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 1994 cont; 



(1) PROPOSED GRADUATED INCOME TAX RATES WOULD; 

Set the following state tax rates for all 
Massachusetts taxable income (after subtracting 
applicable deductions and exemptions) : 



Tax Rate 


Single 


Married 

Filing 

Jointlv 


Married 

Filing 

Separately 


Head of 
Household 


5.5% 


up to 
$50,200 


up to 
$81,000 


up to 
$40,500 


up to 
$60,100 


8.8% 


over 
$50,200 

up to 
$90,000 


over 
$81,000 

up to 
$150,000 


over 
$40,500 

up to 
$75,000 


over 
$60,100 

up to 
$120,000 


9.8% 


over 
$90,000 


over 
$150,000 


over 
$75,000 


over 
$120,000 



A taxpayer whose total taxable income exceeded the upper limit 
for the 5.5% or 8.8% income bracket would still be taxed at the 
lower rate for income within that bracket. For example, a single 
person with $100,000 in taxable income would be taxed at 5.5% on 
$50,200 of that income, at 8.8% on the next $39,800, and at 9.8% 
on the remaining $10,000 of that income. The income brackets 
would be increased annually, starting in 1996, to account for 
changes in the cost of living. 

- Eliminate the existing division of Massachusetts income 
into Part A income (generally, dividends, capital gains, 
and certain interest) , currently taxed at 12 percent, and 
Part B income (all other income), currently taxed at 5.95 
percent. 

Create a "head of household" filing status for single 
persons who have dependents and who file federal returns 
as heads of households. 

- Prevent any gain from the sale of a taxpayer's principal 
residence from being taxed by the state at a rate higher 
that 6%. 

- Provide that non-residents would pay tax on their 
Massachusetts income based on the income rate brackets 
applicable to their total income (including Massachusetts 
and other income) . 

(2) PROPOSED CHANGES IN EXEMPTIONS. DEDUCTIONS AND CREDITS WOULD: 
Replace the child and dependent care expense deduction with a 
child and dependent care tax credit equal to 60% of the 
federal child and dependent care tax credit. 

- Increase the existing exemption for each claimed dependent 
from $1,000 to $2,000. 

- Allow heads of households a personal exemption of $3,400, 
plus $2,200 if blind and $700 if 65 years of age or over. 
Reduce personal exemptions gradually for taxpayers whose 
adjusted gross income exceeded $60,000 for single filers, 
$100,000 for married persons filing jointly, $50,000 for 
married persons filing separately and $80,000 for heads of 
households. The personal exemption would be eliminated 
entirely for filers whose adjusted gross incomes exceeded 
these amounts by more than $50,000 ($25,000 for married 
persons filing separately) . These amounts would be 
increased annually, starting in 1996, to account for 
changes in the cost of living. 



162 



STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 199 4 cont: 



- Allow interest and dividends from deposits in all banks 
and institutions to qualify for the $100 deduction ($200 
for married couples) currently applicable only to 
Massachusetts bank interest and dividends. 

- Allow the $1000 net capital loss deduction to be taken 
against all income, not just against Part A income as 
current law provides. 

(3) PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX AND WATER RATE CREDIT WOULD; 

Create a property tax and water rate credit of up to $200 
for eligible homeowners and renters who have total incomes 
less than: $30,000 for married couples, $25,000 for head 
of household filers and $20,000 for single filers. The 
amount of the credit would depend on the amount by which 
the taxpayers • real estate property tax and water charges 
exceeded 10% of their income. 20% of tenants' rent would 
be treated as a property tax payment for these purposes. 
If the taxpayer had no income tax due, the amount of any 
credit due would be paid to the taxpayer, as long as the 
state Legislature made any appropriation necessary to pay 
such refunds. 

(4) PROPOSED $2000 INCREASE IN THE EXISTING INCOME THRESHOLDS FOR 
NO-TAX STATUS WOULD : 

Exempt taxpayers at or below the following levels of 
adjusted gross income from paying income tax: $14,000 for 
married couples filing jointly, $12,000 for head of 
household filers, and $10,000 for single filers. These 
levels would be adjusted annually, starting in 1996, to 
account for changes in the cost of living. The new levels 
also would apply to the limited income credit which is 
available to taxpayers with adjusted gross income up to 
175 percent of these levels. 

(5) PROPOSED CAPITAL FORMATION INCENTIVE WOULD: 

- Replace the current 50% capital gains deduction with a 
"capital formation incentive" deduction, which would allow 
partial deductions for gains from the sale or exchange of 
qualified stock issued by certain corporations that employ 
50% or more of their employees in Massachusetts. 

- Only gains on original stock purchased on or after January 
1, 1995 from certain corporations engaged in active 
business, and held for required periods of time, would 
qualify for the deduction. The amount of the deduction 
would be 30% of the gain on stock held at least 3 years; 
50% for stock held at least five years; and 70% for stock 
held at least seven years. Detailed provisions would 
restrict the benefit of this deduction to stock issuances 
which reflect new investments in businesses, and would 
disqualify stock in certain types of corporations that 
receive special tax treatment under existing law. 

(6) PROPOSED CAP ON TAX LIABILITY FOR CERTAIN TAXPAYERS IN 1995 
WOULD: 

- Excuse taxpayers at or below the following levels of 
adjusted gross income, as determined under the proposed 
law, from owing more Massachusetts income tax in 1995 than 
they would have owed under 1992 law: $100,000 for married 
couples filing jointly, $80,000 for heads of household, 
$60,000 for single filers, and $50,000 for married persons 
filing separately. 

(7) EFFECTIVE DATE: 

If the State Constitution is amended at the 1994 election 
to require graduated income tax rates, the proposed law would be 
effective beginning in tax year 1995. The proposed law states 

163 



that if any of its provisions were found invalid, the other 
provisions would remain in effect. 



STATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 1994 contt 



Note: Wherever this summary refers to current or existing law, 
the reference is to the law in effect in August 1993. when this 
summary was prepared. 

QUESTION «8 STATE HIGHWAY FUND CHANGES 

This proposed law would increase the portion of gasoline tax 
revenue that would be credited to the state Highway Fund; 
prohibit the transfer of money from the Highway Fund to other 
state funds for other purposes; declare that citizens have a 
right to a safe and efficient public highway, road and bridge 
system and require the state to develop a comprehensive seven- 
year state transportation plan; and make certain other changes in 
state finance laws relating to the Highway Fund. 

The proposed, law would require that the small portion of state 
gasoline tax revenues that is deposited in funds relating to the 
use of watercraft be deposited instead in the Highway Fund. No 
revenue deposited in the Highway Fund could be transferred to any 
other state fund for any purpose other than one for which the 
Highway Fund may be used. 

The proposed law would declare that the citizens of Massachusetts 
have a right to a safe and efficient public highway, road and 
bridge system, constructed and maintained by the state and its 
counties, cities and towns. The state Secretary of 
Transportation and Construction would be required to prepare a 
comprehensive state transportation plan for the period July 1, 
1995 through June 30, 2002, to be updated every three years. The 
plan would provide for the repair or reconstruction of at least 
five percent of public highways and bridges every year, and it 
would establish priorities for highway, road and bridge projects 
based on condition and safety factors. The plan would be 
designed to promote economic development and employment by 
meeting the various transportation needs of residents throughout 
the state. The plan would be prepared after a public hearing and 
after consultation with the state Secretaries of Environmental 
Affairs and Economic Affairs. 

Under the proposed law, money in the Highway Fund would no longer 
be considered in determining whether the state government has 
sufficient money on hand to set some aside for use in future 
fiscal years or to deposit some in the state tax reduction fund. 
The proposed law would declare that no more than 15% of gasoline 
tax revenues could be used for mass transportation purposes, but 
it would not prevent the state Legislature from appropriating 
additional gasoline tax revenues for such purposes. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were 
declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

QUESTION »9 PROHIBITING RENT CONTROL 

This proposed law would prohibit rent control for most privately 
owned housing units in Massachusetts, and would nullify certain 
existing rent control laws, except that cities and towns would be 
authorized to adopt a restricted form of rent control for a six 
month period, after which compliance by property owners would be 
voluntary. 

The proposed law would prohibit any city or town from enacting, 
maintaining or enforcing any law that requires below-market rents 
for residential properties. It would also prohibit the 

164 



8TATE ELECTION NOVEMBER 1994 cont: 

regulation of occupancy, services, evictions, condominium 
conversion, or the removal of the unit from rent control, if such 
regulation was part of a system requiring below-market rents. 
Existing state and local rent control laws would be nullified. 
The proposed law would not affect publicly owned or subsidized 
housing, federally assisted housing, or mobile homes. 

Cities and towns would be authorized to adopt rent control for a 
six-month period on housing units that have a fair market rent of 
$400 or less and that are owned by a person or entity owning ten 
or more rental units. Such rent control could not include the 
regulation of occupancy, services, evictions, condominium 
conversion, or the removal of the unit from rent control. The 
city or town would have to pay the owners or rent-controlled 
units the difference between the controlled rent and the fair 
market rent. After six months, owners of rent-controlled units 
would not be required to comply with the rent control regulation 
or with any other such regulation that the city or town might 
adopt in the future. 

The proposed law would take effect on January 1, 1995. The 
proposed law states that if any of its provisions were declared 
invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 



165 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5. 1994 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 



DESCRIPTION 

Budget Transfer 
$709,986 

Holt Hill Agreement/State Police 



ACTION 
TAKEN 

Approved 
Approved 



3 Holt Hill Agreement/ Cellular One Withdrawn 

4 Sewer Agreement - Lowell/Tewksbury Approved 

5 Train Whistles. Approved 

6 Senior Citizen Voucher Program Approved 

7 Glenwood Road/Conservation Acquisition Approved 

8 Easement/Dundee Park Approved 

9 Easement/Mass Electric - So. Elementary Approved 



166 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5. 1994 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, November 7, 1994, 
The Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in the Town 
Affairs to meet and assemble at the J. Everett Collins Center for 
the Performing Arts on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

MONDAY, THE FIFTH DAY OF DECEMBER, 1994, 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 443 voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 
7:00 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Maynard Thompson, Pastor - 
New England Bible Church, Chandler Road, Andover. 

Salute to the flag was led by Gerald H. Silverman, Chairman, Board 
of Selectman. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 8 non-voters to the meeting 
and to allow non-voters to be escorted to the non voting section 
thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

The Moderator announced the voting sections of the Hall. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading of the Warrant and return of 
service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous 
consent that the Moderator refer to the articles by number and 
subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 12 of the 
1994 Annual Town Meeting (The Budget) by transfer and/or 
appropriation, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
transfer the sum $385,000 from the following accounts: 

Insurance Expenses $300,000 

Debt Service - Interest Expense 85,000 

and appropriate the sum of $709,986, including $385,000 from 
transfers, to the following accounts: 

Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses $ 50,000 

Public Safety - Other Expenses 18,500 

Public Works - other Expenses 41,026 

Andover Public School - Personal Services 300,000 

Andover Public Schools - Other Expenses 300,460 

167 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 1994 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committe Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to enter into an agreement with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of the State Police, for 
the use of property on Holt Hill for purposes of telecommunications 
on terms and conditions deemed by the Town Manager and Board of 
Selectmen to be in the best interests of the Town, including a term 
of up to 15 years or to take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote 
to approve Article 2 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to enter into an Agreement with 
Cellular One or any other entity in the telecommunications field 
for the use of the property on Holt Hill for purposes of 
telecommunications on terms and conditions deemed by the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to be in the best interests of the 
Town, including a term of up to 15 years or to take any other 
action related thereto. 

Article 3 was WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to enter into an Agreement or 
Agreements with the City of Lowell and the Town of Tewksbury to 
provide sewerage disposal services to users of those services in 
the Town of Andover on terms and conditions deemed by the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to be in the best interests of the 
Town, including a term of up to 25 years or to take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote 
to approve Article 4 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager and Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature to enact 
a special law relative to discontinuing the sounding of train 
whistles at railroad crossings in the Town that are otherwise 
protected by warning devices, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote 
to approve Article 5 as printed in the Warrant. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or 
transfer from available funds, a certain sum of money for the 
purpose of providing senior citizens and disabled homeowners with 
a real estate tax payment voucher program pursuant to an agreement 
to be formulated by the Council on Aging and approved by the Town 
Manager or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
to approve Article 6 as printed in the Warrant in the Amount of 
$15,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



168 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 1994 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the purchase, 
for the amount of $30,000 to be paid from Conservation Commission 
funds, of the land and improvements at 15 Glenwood Road Extension, 
sometimes known as 58 Glenwood Road, to be held in the custody and 
control of the Conservation Commission pursuant to General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 8C, and reserving a life estate to the sellers, 
William C. Vaughan and Isabel Rita Vaughan, or to take any other 
action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote 
to approve Article 7 as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. The Town of Andover to grant Dundee Office Park Joint 
Venture and Dundee Park Limited Partnership, with respect to its 
property situated off Essex Street, Andover, MA, a perpetual 
easement to pass and repass with vehicles or otherwise, over land 
owned by the Town of Andover, situated off Essex Street and 
described at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 
846, Page 254, and Book 994, Page 421, and for all other normal 
purposes ancillary to the use of an easement of this nature. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote 
that the Town authorize the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen to 
Grant to Dundee Office Park Joint Venture and Dundee Park Limited 
Partnership, with respect to its property situated off Essex 
Street, Andover, MA, a perpetual easement to pass and repass with 
vehicles and otherwise, and for normal utility purposes, over land 
owned by the Town of Andover, situated off Essex Street and 
described at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 
646, Page 254, and Book 994, Page 421, and for other normal 
purposes ancillary to the use of an easement of this nature, all 
upon terms and conditions which the Town Manager and the Board of 
Selectmen deem in the best interest of the Town, including but not 
limited to an indemnity to the Town for the exercise of rights 
under the easement. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report : Approval : Contingent upon approval of 

the terms and conditions of the 
easement by Town Counsel and the 
Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to grant an easement to the 
Massachusetts Electric Company for the furnishing of electric 
service and transmission of electric current and for the 
installation and maintenance of all necessary poles, equipment and 
appurtenances and all necessary underground cables and wires, in 
the location near South Elementary School as shown on Massachusetts 
Electric Company Sketch Number 043-94-07 dated September 24, 1994 
and titled "Sketch showing proposed transformer and duct bank on 
private property owned by the Town of Andover, located on Woburn 
Street", or to take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote 
to approve Article 9 as printed in the Warrant. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Urbelis and duly seconded it was 
voted by a Majority vote to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 
8:10 P. M. . 

ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



169 




n«« w 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1994 

ELECTED 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Gerald H. Silverman, Ch. 
Larry L. Larsen 
James M. Barenboim 
QhaaJe ftfi TT Wm . n i ww, i Ti 1 
William T. Downs 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Ronald C. Hajj, Ch. 
John P. Hess 



James A. Cuticchia 
Hartley M. Burnham* 
* Appointed by Commissioner 
of Dept. of Comm. Affairs 



- 1995 

- 1997 

- 1997 

* — i a»&* 

- 1996 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Richard R. Muller, Ch. 
Susan T. Dalton 
ttnry Fiairir Tjiiiiii 



1996 
1997 
-1995 - 



1996 
1995 
1995 
1999 
1996 



W /H l ifl T d J. IIu&Lun, Ji. 
Lloyd J. WilleyN 
-T,no- ^Vt^cca 



- 1997 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch. , Lawr. 
Joseph N. Gleason, Andover 
Terrence M. Breen, Methuen 
Michael E. Condon, Methuen 
Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 
Robert T. McCann, Lawrence 
John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty 



- 1995 



TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 

Alcide J. Legendre - 1995 

Edwin F. Reidel - 1996 

Virginia H. Cole - 1997 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 1997 

Joan M. Lewis - 1997 

John R. Petty - 1997 

Robert A. Finlayson - 1997 

Donna C. Ellsworth - 1997 
Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James M. Diamond 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 



170 



APPOINTED 
TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Donald W. Robb, Ch. 
Thomas E. Fardy 
Gerald T. Mulligan 
Joanne F. Marden 
William T. Novelline, Jr. 
Margaret I. Jurgen 
Anthony J. Sakowich 
Donald F. Schroeder 



PLANNING BOARD 

Hooks K. Johnston, Jr. , Ch. 
Michael H. Miller 
Susan A. Alovisetti 
Lorene A. Comeau 
Paul J. Salafia 



ZONING BOA RD OF APPEALS 
Daniel S. Casper, Ch, 
Pamela H. Mitchell 
Paul Bevacqua 
Peter F. Re illy 
Carol C. McDonough 

Associate Members: 
Donald K. Ellsworth 
David W. Brown 
Alan R. Shulman 
John F. Bradley II 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

John R. Williams, Ch. 
Carolyn A. Simko 
Wendall A. Mattheson 



TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 
Karen M. Herman, Ch. 
Martin Klein 
Thomas J. Swift 
Laurence J. Lamagna 
Ruth M. Dunbar 
Patricia H. Edmonds 
Maria A. Rizzo 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Pustell, Ch. 
Donald D. Cooper 
Jason S. Cohen 
Mark S. Curtin 
Julie Gershon 
Paul J. Finger 
Mark R. DeLisio 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

William J. Krajeski 
Archibald D. Maclaren 
John R. Petty 

TOWLEFUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Westcott 
Marilyn R. Brody 

DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 

Ann E. Constant ine 
Donald J. Harding 
William B. Maren 

MERR VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 
Dr. Stephen Loring 
Frederick M. Childs 

GR. LAW. SANITARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Karen M. Herman, Ch. 
Ann E. Constant ine 
Norma A. Gammon 
James S. Batchelder 
Stephen W. Kearn 
John S. Dugger 
Frank J. Byrne 
Phillip K. Allen, Ch. 
John S. Sullivan, Ch. 



Emeritus 
Emeritus 



171 



ANDOVER CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Ron Wackowski, Ch. 
John F. Zipeto 
Margaret A. Pustell 
Teresa Morgan 
Anne M. Sullivan 
Gail L. Ralston 
Selma P. Flieder 
Diane Pitochelli 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Dorothy L. Bresnahan, Ch. 

William L. Lane 

William T. Ryan 

Martin E. Epstein 

Deborah Silber stein 

Paul L. Twomey 

Oscar Rosenberg 

Arthur W. Smith 

Elizabeth Tice 

Doris B. Hudgins 

Robert P. Kenney, Emeritis 

Thomas F. Powers, Emeritus 

RETIREMENT BOARD 

William T. Downs 
Mary Kelvie Lyman 
Rodney P. Smith 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 
James M. Marsh, Ch. 
Marjorie E. Dennis 
Gilbert E. Martin, Jr. 
Michael P. Parsons 
Susan E. Jenkins 
Allan M. Clarke 
Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr.* 
♦School Committee's Designee 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

John R. Dempsey. Ch. 
Annetta R. Freedman 
Barbara Worcester 
James P. Murphy 
James M. Lyman 

INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Michael W. Morris 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
Robert A. Finlayson 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

John J. Lewis 
John A. Campbell 
John C. Doherty 
Harold F. Hayes 
John W. Milne 
Edward J. Morrissey 
Edward Cole 
Kathryn T. Conti 
James M. Deyermond 

350TH ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 

Norma A. Gammon, Ch. 
James D. Doherty 
Robert W. Phinney 
Mary L. Ordman 
Frederic A. Stott 
Cynthia J. Milne 
Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 
Margaret R. Cronin 
Robert J. Macartney 
Karen M. Herman 
Edward Cole 

Edward C. Williams, Jr. 
Stephen W. Kearn 
John S. Sullivan 
Ann E. Constant ine 
Arnold W. Dyer, Jr. 
V. David Rodger 
Virginia L. Begg 
James A. Kapelson 
Christopher S. Doherty 
Paul D. Murphy 
James S. Batchelder 
James J. Redmond, Jr. 
Ann L. Kendall 
David F. Lynch 



DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
S. Joseph Hoffman 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP/FAIR HOUSING 

David Hastings 
Christopher D. Haynes 
Lorene A. Comeau 



172 



RAI.f.ARnVALE HISTORIC DISTRICT 
STUDY COMMITTEE 

Timothy W. Barash, Ch. 
John R. Petty 
Jane E. Griswold 
Richard H. Moody 
Ruth A. Sharpe 
Bernice M. Haggerty 
Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 
Roy D. Umanzio, Alternate 
John Dugger, Alternate 

YOUTH COUNCIL 

Brian P. Major 
Kathleen M. Hess 
Colleen Georgian 



ZONING BYLAW TASK FORCE 

Daniel S. Casper 
Carol C. McDonough 
Jane E. Griswold 
Michael H. Miller 
Paul J. Finger 
Steven L. Burdeau 

TAX CLASSD7ICATION TASK FORCE 
Francis X. Orlandella, Ch, 
Ronald D. Sanfield 
Mark E. Courtney 
Gregory R. Doyle 
Enzo S. Fossella 
Marilyn M. Lane 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 

Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Civil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

Community Development Department 

Director of Health Everett F. Penney 

Director of Planning Stephen L. Colyer 

Conservation Administrator James A. Greer 

Inspector of Buildings Kaija M. Gilmore 

Electrical Inspector Richard J. Salenas 

Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector Bruce P. Hale 

Council On Aging Sharon L. Souza 

Finance and Budget Director Anthony J. Torrisi 

Chief Assessor William J. Krajeski 

Collector/Treasurer David J. Reilly 

Data Processing Manager Barbara D. Morache 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Veterans Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Fire Chief Harold F. Hayes 

Housing Authority Executive Director Nancy M. Marcoux 

Municipal Maintenance Director James J. Brightney 

Building Superintendent Kenneth H. Parker 

Forester (Cemetery, Forestry, Parks) James M. Bamford 

PHE/Vehicle Maint. Superintendent Dennis L. Daniels 

Personnel Director Candace Hall 

Police Chief James F. Johnson 

Animal Control Officer Wayne D. Nader 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A. Zalla 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade 

Highway Superintendent John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Town Engineer Robert E. McQuade (Acting) 

Memorial Hall Library Director James E. Sutton 

Superintendent of Schools Richard E. Neal 

Town Accountant Rodney P. Smith 

Town Clerk Randall L. Hanson 

Town Counsel Thomas J. Urbelis 

Town Manager Reginald S. Stapczynski 



173 



HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617) 565-3170 

SR-315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 02114 

(617) 565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

11 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01852 

(508) 459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

(202) 225-3411 

State Senator: 

John D. O'Brien, Jr. (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

107 High Street, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 520, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-1612 

State Representatives: 

Gary M. Coon (R) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

C-l Colonial Drive, No. 6, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 124, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2100 

Edward A. LeLacheur (D) 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

63 Fruit Street, Lowell, MA 01852 

State House, Room 146, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2582 



174 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

***************** 
Mailing Address: 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 
Business Hours at the Town Offices; 

8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 

Telephone Numbers: 

Town Offices 470-3800 

Fax Number 475-1290 

DCS Classes & Activities 470-3800 ext. 280 

Department of Public Works 475-6980 

Police Department - Business 475-0411 

Fire Department - Business 475-1281 

Police/Fire - Emergency 475-1212 

Animal Control Officer 475-0411 

Memorial Hall Library 475-6960 

Senior Center 470-3800 

Superintendent of Schools 470-3800 ext. 401 

Personnel Office 470-3800 ext. 408 

Andover's Population: 31,185 Square Miles: 32 

Recycling: 

Curbside Pickup: Every other week - recyclables (glass - clear, 

green & brown - newspapers, magazines, and 
steel & tin cans - crush/ flatten) will be 
collected on the same day as the trash 
collection. Place recycling bin curbside by 
7:00 A.M. on your pick up day. 

Recycling information & complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. 

1-800-562-0321 

Recycling Site: Third Saturday of each month at West 

Middle School from 9:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. 
Plastics (#1 & #2) and aluminum 
materials. 



175 



Compost Site: High Plain Road (Bald Hill area) . Leaves 

and grass clippings. Open year round for 
walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local 
newspapers . 

Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: Vining Disposal at 1-800-432-9996 

Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints; Highway Division at 475-3580 or 

Dept. of Public Works at 475-6980 

How to dispose of an applicanee: Appliances can no longer be left 

curbside with your trash - their 
disposal is the homeowner's 
responsibility. Suggestions for 
disposal: call Massachusetts 
Electric Company's Appliance 
Recycling Program at 1-800-962-3939, 
hire a private contractor or check 
with the company where your new 
appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 

Andover's Tax Rate: $16.06 - Residential and Open Space 

$24.19 - Commerical/Industrial & Personal 
Property 

When are taxes due: Taxes are due quarterly on the following 

dates : 

August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 

Excise tax information: Call Assessor's Office at 470-3800 ext. 305 

Town Meeting and Election: Town Election is held the fourth Monday 

of March. Andover has an Open Town 
Meeting which is generally held three 
weeks following the Town Election. 

Voter Registration Information: Town Clerk's Office 470-3800 ext. 320 

Where to obtain a Birth Certificate: Town Clerk's Office 

Where to obtain a Marriage License: Town Clerk's Office 

Where to obtain a Fishing & Hunting License: Town Clerk's Office 



176 



TO: Residents of Andover 

FROM: Dept. of Public Works 

DATE: January 1995 

SUBJECT: recycling drop -off program 



WHEN: Third Saturday of Each Month 
WHERE: West Middle School 
TIME: 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM 

PLASTIC: 



- Milk and Water Containers (flattened) 

- Plastic soda bottles and plastic liquor bottles 
and other plastic containers marked mTi^| on 
the bottom. ^*W 

- Plastic household detergent bottles and other 
plastic containers marked Jf^L on bottom. 

ALUMINUM PRODUCTS : 



- Such as soda cans, alum, trays, pots & pans, storm 
window & storm door frames, and beach chair frames 

- Check with a magnet, a magnet will NOT stick 



THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT 111 

P.S. PLEASE Sort At Home I 

111 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and 
comments about our municipal services and policies, or any general 
comments you may have about the Town of Andover. Please let us 
know what you think on this survey and return it to: 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 




Gerald H. Silverman (Reginald S. Stapczynski 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen Town Manager 




Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon, 



Name and address 
(Optional) 



178 



Anim al Inspection 65 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Community Dev. & Planning 49 

B uilding Division 49 

Conservation Division 51 

Electrical Inspection 50 

Health Division 52 

Planning Division 57 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 50 

Zoning Board of Appeals 58 

Community Services 60 

Council on Aging 62 

Director of Town Officials 170 

Directory of DepL/Div. Heads 173 

Finance & Budget 16 

Assessors 20 

Central Purchasing 17 

Collector /Treasurer 18 

Data Processing 19 

Veterans Services 19 

Financial Statements 80 

Fire Department 38 

Gr. Lawrence Voc Tech. HS 61 

1994 Highlights 4 

Historical Commission 64 

Housing Authority 65 

How to Reach Elected Officials 174 

How Can We Help You? 175 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 24 



INDEX 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 24 

Memorial Hall Library 29 

Municipal Maintenance 43 

B uilding 43 

Forestry 47 

Parks 46 

Plumbing, Heating & Electrical 47 

Spring Grove Cemetery 46 

Vehicle Maintenance 48 

Police Department 32 

Animal Control 37 

Emergency Management 37 

Department of Public Works 39 

Engineering 39 

Gr. Lawrence Sanitary District 42 

Highway 40 

Sewer 41 

Solid Waste 40 

Water 41 

Recycling Committee 42 

School Building Committee 68 

School Department 69 

350th Anniversary Committee 67 

Town Clerk 28 

Town Counsel 31 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 99 

Tr. Punchard Free School 25 

We Would Like to Hear From You 178 



VISION STATEMENT 

The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. Its 
legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should 
experience the treasures of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, 
and learning. As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from the 
past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

TOWN OF ANDOVER BOARD OF SELECTMEN